Lt. William Clarke

Lt. William CLARKE (1610 – 1690) was Alex’s 9th Great Grandfather; one of 1,024 in this generation of the Miller line.

We have more unrelated Clark families in our tree than any other surname.  In addition to Lt. William ClARKE, our Clark family founders are: John CLARK (Plymouth) (1575 – 1623),  John CLARK (Hingham) (1560 – 1615), and Arthur CLARK (Boston) (1620 – 1665)

Immigrant Ancestor

Lt. William Clarke was born in 22 Jul 1610 in Dorsetshire, England.  His parents may haven been Thomas CLARKE (1578/83 – 1623/27) and Rose KEREDGE (1587 – ).   He married Sarah STRONG around 1636 in Dorchester, Mass.   He moved to Northampton, Mass in 1659.  His Northampton homestead is now the Northern half of Smith College.

In 1653 William Clarke was granted 12 acres on the West side of what is now Elm Street, bordering on Mill river, and comprising today the North half of the campus of Smith College.                    Paradise Pond, here framed by apple blossoms, is a focus of  the Smith College landscape as well as an educational, historical, and environmental asset. The Pond is part of the Mill River, which in the 1800s was one of the most heavily industrialized rivers of its size in the world.

After Sarah died, he married Sarah Slye Cooper on 15 Nov 1676 in Northampton, Mass.   William died 19 Jul 1690 in Northampton, Mass and is buried in the Bridget Street Cemetery in Northampton.

William Clarke – Headstone Bridge Street Cemetery Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts  Note: the headstone is not original

There are three versions on the arrival of William Clarke in the New World:

Version 1 – He departed Plymouth, England on March 30, 1630 aboard the ship ‘Mary and John’ arriving in Nautucket (now called Hull) on May 30, 1630. He would have been 21 at that time. This is the version that appears in most family records.

Version 2 – William Clarke emigrated in 1630 aboard the ship ‘William and Mary’ in the company of Rev. Mister Warham of Plymouth, Dorsetshire, England. He settled first in Dorchester, Suffolk, Ma. prior to 1635, where he officiated as Townsman or Selectman from 1646 to 1653, removing to Northampton in 1659.

Version 3 – William Clarke left England on the ship ‘Mary and Jane’, which sailed from London on March 24, 1633, arriving in New England in June of that year. This last version seems the most likely, even though it does not agree with ‘old family tradition’. The port of embarkation also differs.

Sarah Strong was born 1613  in Chardstock, Dorsetshire, England  Her parents were Thomas STRONG and Joanna BAGGE. Thomas was the brother of Richard Strong who was their daughter-in-law Hannah’s father.  That makes Sarah’s grandfather, George STRONG  (1556 – 1636) a double ancestor. Sarah died on 6 Sep 1675 in Northampton Mass and is also buried at the Bridge Street Cemetery in Northampton.

Little is known for sure about Sarah, not even her surname, or exact date and place of birth. Since her husband, William Clarke, is first noted in the town of Dorchester in 1635, and apparently arrived there from England unmarried, virtually every unmarried Sarah in Dorchester at that time, has been suggested. I have seen Strong, Holton, Bolton, Lambert, Lumbert, Smith and too many more to mention. What I haven’t seen is any positive proof for any of these. At present, all that has been proven of Sarah, is that she and William were admitted as Church members in Dorchester in 1636, resigned from that church to be admitted to the new church in Northampton, in 1666, that all of her children were born in Dorchester, and that she was a good and loving wife to William.  There are several theories about William’s first wife Sarah:

Mark Tyree believes Sarah Strong And Eleanor Strong (both born 1613 of Richard John STRONG) are the same person and that she arrived in America with her mother Eleanor and her stepfather William Cogan sometime before 1636.

Robin Mitchell says Elder John Stronge is the son of John (Richard) Stronge and Eleanor Deane. John (Richard) Stronge died before the birth of his youngest child in 1613. This is well documented in his will.

After John (Richard) Stronge’s death, his wife, Eleanor Deane, daughter of a tanner, married William Cogan (a tanner by trade) before the birth of John (Richard) Stronge’s offspring by Eleanor in 1613. Following a west country tradition, the daughter is christened “Eleanor,” after her mother. Though she is a “Stronge” by blood, William Cogan refers to her as “my daughter,” and raises her as such with the name Eleanor Cogan.

Young (Elder) John Stronge learns the tanning trade from William Cogan and Eleanor Deane’s father, Walter Deane. Sarah Stronge, the future wife of Lt. William Clarke, was born in 1613 to Thomas Stronge, the brother of Elder John Stronge’s father. This makes Sarah Stronge the cousin of Elder John Stronge.

An Ancestry.com user named hourglasssrs adds “It appears from reviewing all the data that Sarah was born Strong; then her mother remarried a man named Holton (or Houlton) – thus she ended up being known by both names.”

Some say Some genealogists say that he married Sarah Strong earlier and he married Sarah Lumbert  in 1636. (See discussion below)

Here’s what I’ve found about the Holtons in Northampton

William Holton (1610 – 1691 ) of Hartford & Northampton came to New England in “The Francis”, sailing from Ipswich in 1634. He had a sister, Sarah, who was baptized in Nayland, Suffolk, England, Parish of Holton St. Marys, but nothing more is known about her.”

Deacon William Holton was one of the first settlers of Hartford, CT, and one of the eight original petitioners for liberty to plant and settle at Nonotuck (Northampton), Massachusetts, whither he went in 1653. When the first board of magistrates was appointed in 1665 by the General court, it consisted of William Holton, Thomas Bascom and Edward Elmore. he was the first deacon of the church of Northampton (ordained June 13, 1663), and a representative to the General court (1667-69). He died Aug. 12, 1691, at age about 80. His widow Mary died Nov 16, 1691.

His daughter Sarah married Nov 18, 1656, Capt. John King of Northampton, whose grand-daughter, Experience King (daughter of Lt. John King, Jr., of Northampton, and Mehitable Pomeroy) married Col. Timothy Dwight of Northampton, grandfather of President Timothy Dwight of Yale College. His second daughter Mary married Nov 18, 1656, David Burt, whose daughter, Mary Burt, married Dr. Thomas Hastings of Hadley, Mass., the ancestor of Thomas Hastings, Esq., Musical Doctor and Composer in New York.  His remaining daughter Ruth married Feb 5, 1663, Joseph Baker and afterwards to 2nd husband Thomas Lyman (son of Richard Lyman the settler). They were the parents of Noah Lyman father of the celebrated Gen. Phineas Lyman of Suffield, CT)

Some genealogists say that he married Sarah Strong earlier and he married Sarah Lumbert  in 1636.   Supposedly, this Sarah was the sister of Thomas LUMBERT and Bernard Lumbert.  While the Lumberts were also from Dorsetshire, they immigrated to Barnstable on Cape Cod.

My revised guess is that William Clarke’s daughter Sarah died young and Joseph BENJAMIN‘s wife Sarah was the daughter of Arthur CLARK and Sarah THAYER.

William’s Sarah was born 21 Apr 1638 Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass. and died 21 Jun 1638 Dorchester.

Arthur’s Sarah was born 1 Aug 1639 Yarmouth, Barnstable, Mass. She married Joseph BENJAMIN. This Sarah died after 1716 as she was still living in New London, New London, Connecticut when her son John died.  The Sarah who married Joseph Benjamin would have been 1st cousin to Jemima, 1st wife of Joseph and Daughter of Thomas LUMBERT.

Sarah Slye Cooper was baptized 29 Oct 1615 at Lapwirth, Warwickshire, England.  Her parents were George Slye and [__?__].  There is evidence she was a sister of Capt. Robert Slye of Hartford,CT, later of Maryland.   She first married Lt. Thomas Cooper about 1642.   Sarah died 8 May 1688 in Northampton, Mass.

There is some contention about this Sarah’s heritage. Different sources say that she was the daughter of either George Slye or John Russell.  Either way, this Sarah was the wife of Lt. Thomas Cooper of Springfield.  After he was killed there on 5 Oct 1675 during the Indian raid, Sarah and at least one daughter fled to Northampton.   Sarah and Rebecah lived with Lt. Clarke and his family (he was a widower at this time). Lt. Clarke married Sarah and his son John married Rebecah on 12 Jul  1677.  The unpublished manuscript of Edith M. Clark Nyman states that Sarah was the sister of William Russell of New Haven, which would mean she was the daughter of John Russell. There is some evidence that there were TWO Thomas Cooper’s in Springfield at the time of the Indian raid-both married to a Sarah. 

Thomas Cooper was born about 1617 (aged 18 in 1635). Carpenter who came to Massachusetts Bay in 1635 on the “Christian.” First settled in Windsor; moved to Springfield by 1642 when he married Sarah Slye.   They had nine children: Sarah Day, Timothy, Thomas, Elizabeth, Mary Colton Stebbins, John, infant daughter, Rebecca Clark, & John.  Thomas was killed 5 Oct 1675 in Springfield, Hampden, Mass.

Children of William and Sarah Strong:

Name Born Married Departed
1. Sarah Clark? 21 Apr 1638
Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass.
or
1 Aug 1639 Yarmouth, Barnstable, Mass
Joseph BENJAMIN
7 Dec 1668 Yarmouth, Mass.
21 Jun 1638
Dorchester
or
after 1716 as she was still living in New London, New London, Connecticut when her son John died
2. Jonathan Clark 1 Aug 1639
Dorchester
1 Oct 1639
Dorchester
3. Nathaniel Clark 27 Jan 1642
Dorchester
Mary Meekins
8 May 1663
Hadley, Mass.
30 Mar 1669
Northampton Mass
4. Experience Clark 30 Mar 1643
Dorchester
1662
Northampton
5. Increase Clark 1 Mar 1646
Dorchester
24 Apr 1662
Northampton
6. Rebecca Clark 1 Mar 1648/49
Dorchester
Israel Rust
9 Dec 1669
8 Feb 1733
Northampton
7. Deacon John Clark 1 May 1651
Dorchester
Rebecca Cooper (daughter of Sarah Slye Cooper)
.
Mary Strong (Daughter of Elder John STRONG)
20 Mar 1679
Northampton
3 Sep 1704 or 2 Nov 1704
Windsor, CT
from fatigue and cold taken in a snowstorm on his way home from Boston
8. Samuel Clark 16 Oct 1653
Dorchester
Elizabeth Edwards
1 Mar 1682
Northampton
5 Aug 1729
Northampton
9. Capt. William CLARK 3 Jul 1656
Dorchester
Hannah STRONG
15 Jul 1680
.
Mary Smith
31 Jan 1694/95
9 May 1725
Lebanon, CT
10. Sarah Clark 19 Mar 1659
Dorchester
Capt. John Parsons
23 Dec 1675
Northampton
15 Apr 1728
Northampton

The first fully proven record of William Clark is found in Dorchester Church Records which shows that William Clarke and wife, Sarah, were members of that church on August 23, 1636. The births of their 10 children were all recorded in Dorchester. Town records of Dorchester show that William obtained about 8 acres of land at Squantum Neck from William Hill before February 23, 1638, because he sold an acre and a quarter on that date.

He was elected Selectman in Dorchester in 1645, 1647 and 1650. He was a ‘Rater’ (assessor) in 1651, 52, 55 and 57. In 1652-1653 he was one of four men appointed to lay out land for Augustine Clement and was elected Fence Viewer in 1653, 56 and 58.

In May of 1653, Clarke was one of 24 petitioners to the Mass. General Court who desired to inhabit Northampton. All except Clarke were from Connecticut.  On Oct 3, 1653, the first meeting of the proprietors of Northampton was held at either Springfield or Hartford, and William Clarke attended and signed as a proprietor. However, he didn’t move there because in 1654 he was chosen as a “Boundsman” to lay out a way to the burial grounds and to determine the bounds between Dorchester and Braintree. In 1655, between Dorchester and Dedham; and in 1658 between Dorchester and Braintree and Dorchester and Roxbury. Also in 1658, he was on a committee to lay out land for Gamaleel Beaman, and in 1659, to lay out meadow lots and to survey land for a school. The committee later appointed John Capen to replace Clarke, who had moved to Northampton.

In the Genealogical and Family History of State of CT-Vol II, c. 1911 starting on page 652 “Lt. William Clarke, immigrant ancestor, was mentioned.

He was granted 12 acres on the West side of what is now Elm Street, bordering on Mill river, and comprising today the North half of the campus of Smith College. He built a log house where he lived until 1681, when it was burned, being set on fire by a negro, Jack, a servant of Samuel Wolcott, who took a brand of fire from the hearth and swung it up and down to “find victuals”. The new house built in its place remained standing until 1826. Lt. Clarke organized in 1661 a train band of 60 men, which he commanded in King Philip’s War. He served as selectman 20 years, and was also a judge of the county court. After his death a monument was erected in 1884 to his memory by his descendants. The old gravestone is still preserved. One last item that will hopefully clear up some confusion-although Lt. William spelled his last name CLARKE, only one of his children continued to do so after his death. That was his namesake-William Jr., who left Northampton about 1698 for Lebanon, CT. Most of William Jr’s offspring continue this tradition for several generations before dropping the E. Some, to this day, never have.

William Clarke was the first citizen of Northampton to be elected deputy to the General Court, and 14 times between 1663 and 1682 was elected to that office, although not consecutively. He was Associate Justice of county court for 26 years; In 1662, he was authorized by the General Court to solemnize marriages, being the first person in that town to hold that responsible position. Frequently appointed by the Court to deal with Indians.

He was chosen Lieutenant of the first military company ever organized in Northampton, when that was the office of highest rank to which the company, on account of its small number of men was entitled, and was in active service during King Philip’s War and was at the same time a member of the military committee of the county. He supplied the commissary department to some extent during King Philip’s Indian War and the Legislature ordered the Treasurer to pay him in 1676 ‘thirty-eight pounds, eighteen shillings for “Porke and bisket” delivered to the country’s use’.

He helped to build the first grist mill and the first saw mill in the town. He was greatly interested in promoting the new settlement of Squakheag (Northfield) and is named as having served as town clerk at the second settlement of that place, although there is no evidence that he ever lived there. Several times he was chosen commissioner, with others, to determine disputed boundaries between Northampton and neighboring towns. His home lot, one of the largest, covered the north half of the Smith College property. Tradition states that here he built a block house upon this lot which was used for refuge during the Indian troubles.  In 1671, he was licensed to sell “wine, cider or liquor for a year”. He had large grants of land in the meadows and elsewhere and purchased many acres in different parts of the town. All his lands, embracing nearly two hundred acres, with the exception of 7 3/4 acres, he disposed of before his death to his sons, reserving to himself an annuity of 24 pounds.

His dwelling house was burned in 1681, having been set on fire by a Negro, as he averred in search of food.

“The house of Lieut. William Clarke, situated very nearly on the ground now occupied by the main Smith College building, was burned on the night of July 14, 1681. It was built of logs, and Clarke and his wife were living in it at the time. A Negro, named Jack, set the house on fire. He confessed the deed and pretended that it was done accidentally, while he was searching for food, swinging a burning brand to light his way. Jack did not belong in town; he was a servant to Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield;  and had already been before the courts for other misdemeanors.  His object undoubtedly, was robbery, and it is not probable that he went about the house searching for food even, with a lighted pine torch in his hands. Very likely after stealing whatever he could lay his hands upon, he set the house on fire to conceal the robbery, or from spite against William Clarke, who was at this time 72 years of age.

Jack was arrested in Brookfield or Springfield, and was brought before the court in Boston, where he plead not guilty. When his confession was read to him, however, he acknowledged it, and the jury brought in a verdict of guilty. The court believed his confession as to setting the house on fire, but did not credit his statement that it was done carelessly. He was sentenced to be “hanged by the neck till he be dead and then taken down and burnt to ashes in the fire with Maria, the Negro”. Maria was under sentence of death for burning the houses of Thomas Swan, and of her master, Joshua Lamb, in Roxbury. She was burned alive. Both of these Negroes were slaves. Why the body of Jack was burned is not known.

note 1: Many slaves were burned alive in New York and New Jersey, and in the southern colonies, but few in Massachusetts. note 2: Tradition has handed down the following items concerning the burning of Clarke’s house: The Negro fastened the door on the outside so that no one could escape, and set the fire on the outside. William Clarke injured his hands considerably (pounded them, it is said) in his endeavor to escape, and his wife was somewhat burned. John Clarke, grandson of William, a little more than a year old, was brought out of the house and laid beside the fence. There was powder in one of the chambers, and when it exploded the ridge pole was blown across the road, and one end forced into the ground. The Negro had taken offense at something William Clarke had done in his official capacity, and set the fire in a spirit of revenge. He was discovered either at Brookfield, Springfield, or near New Haven, and identified by means of a jack-knife in his possession that belonged to the Clarke’s.” History of Northampton Massachusetts From Its Settlement in 1654 (James Russell Trumbull – Printed in Northampton in 1898)

Children:

1. Sarah CLARKE? (See Joseph BENJAMIN‘s page)
My revised guess is that William Clarke’s daughter Sarah died young and Joseph’s wife Sarah was the daughter of Arthur CLARK and Sarah THAYER.

William’s Sarah was born 21 Apr 1638 Dorchester, Suffolk, Mass. and died 21 Jun 1638 Dorchester.

Arthur’s Sarah was born 1 Aug 1639 Yarmouth, Barnstable, Mass. She married Joseph BENJAMIN. This Sarah died after 1716 as she was still living in New London, New London, Connecticut when her son John died.  The Sarah who married Joseph Benjamin would have been 1st cousin to Jemima, 1st wife of Joseph and Daughter of Thomas LUMBERT.

By the way, Thomas LUMBERT’s son Bernard Lumbert (1608-1663) married as his second wife Mary Clarke (1611 in Great Bromley, Essex, England – 1683 in Barnstable, Mass.)  Her parents were William Clarke (1576 in Great Bromley, Essex, England – 12 Jul 1632 in Great Bromley) and Margaret Hadlock.   She had a brother William Clarke who was born on 6 Feb 1611 in Great Bromley, Essex, England.  He married Katherine Bunce.  This William and Katherine immigrated before 1631 to New England.  They   He died on 15 Mar 1682 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts.

Spouse: Katherine BUNCE.

3. Nathaniel Clark

Nathaniel’s wife Mary Meekins was born 8 Jun 1645 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Mass. Her parents were Thomas Meakins and Sarah Catherine Beardsley. Mary died 10 Apr 1705 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass.

6. Rebecca Clark

Rebecca’s husband Israel Rust was born 12 Nov 1643 in Hingham, Plymouth, Mass. His parents were Henry Rust and Hannah [__?__]. Israel died 11 Nov 1712 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass.

7. Deacon John Clark

John’s first wife Rebecca Cooper was born 15 May 1657 in Springfield, Hampden, Mass. They were married on 12 Jul 1677 and she died during childbirth when their only child Sarah was born on 28 April 1678. Rebecca was the daughter of Captain Thomas Cooper and Sarah Slye and her father-in-law’s step-daughter due to a double marriage.

John’s second wife Mary Strong was born on 26 Oct 1654 at Windsor, Hartford, CT.   Her parents were [our ancestors] Elder John STRONG and Abigail FORD. Mary died on 8 Dec 1738 at Northampton, Mass.

“It is not known where John lived and brought up his family but, probably in the house later known as the Upham House, half way between Pres. Seelyes’ and Mr. Maltby’s. He inherited the southern six acres of Lt. William’s home lot but, at that time, he was already the father of eight children. Sometimes referred to as “Sgt. John”, but more usually as “Dea. John”, he was a much respected and useful man in both town and church affairs. He was first elected selectman in 1689 and served in that office in 1692, 93, 96, 98 and from 1700 until his death. He also served on numerous committees and was a Deputy to the General Court from 1699 to 1703. In 1691, he was the sixth man chosen as Deacon of the First Church and served 14 years until his death. Deacon John died at Windsor, Ct. Sept. 3, 1704 from fatigue and cold taken in a snowstorm on his way home from Boston. At that time, a trip to Boston on horseback was about a week’s journey.

Most sources indicate he died Sept 3, but I have also seen Nov 2 as a death date, which would make much more sense if the cause of his death was a snowstorm.

On 12 Oct  1704, his widow and sons, John and Nathaniel, filed an inventory of his estate which included 13 parcels of land valued at £488.10s. This included his house and homestead, the Joshua Carter lot willed to him by his father and land in Lebanon, Ct. His personal estate valued at £161.9s included 2 oxen, 4 cows, 10 steers, 3 heifers, 3 horses, a mare, colt, sheep and a long list of household goods and furniture. The estate was owed £24-07-05 and owed debts which totaled £43-19-07. The net estate value was £630-06-05.”

Children with Mary: John, Nathaniel, Ebenezer, Increase, Mary, Rebecca, Experience, Abigail, Noah, Thankful, and Josiah. Eleven of his children lived to marry and have families.

8. Samuel Clark

Samuel’s wife Elizabeth Edwards was born 22 Feb 1660 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass. Her parents were Alexander Edwards and Sarah Baldwin Searle of Springfield.  Elizabeth died 4 Sep 1690 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass

Children who lived to adulthood: Elizabeth, Sarah. Samuel, Joanna, and Miriam.

Samuel Clark Headstone “Mr Saml Clark dyed on Augst ye 5 1729 aged ner 76 year who buryd 4 sons and 5 daughtr” Bridge Street Cemetery Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts

9. Capt. William CLARK (See his page)

10. Sarah Clark

Sarah’s husband John Parsons was born 14 Aug 1650 in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts.  His parents were Joseph Parsons (1620 – 1683) and
Mary Bliss  (1628 – 1712).  John died 15 Apr 1728 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass.

Capt. John Parsons Gravestone –Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts,.

Inscription:
“Capt John Persons dyed on Apr ye 19 annod 1728 aged 79 years”.

Children: Sarah, Mary, Samuel, William, Experience, and Joseph. Samuel and Joseph were killed by Indians in 1708.

Sarah Clark Parsons Bridge Street Cemetery Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts

Sources:

http://www.familytreesite.org/clarke.htm

http://www.theharmons.us/harmon_t/names17.htm

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=172497&st=1


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37 Responses to Lt. William Clarke

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  8. Linda Reiner vose says:

    Thanks for sharing this – Our line comes dow from Captain William Clark and Hannah Strong – I will be going to Northhampton for the first time next weekend and will be anxiously going to visit the graves

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  16. LClark says:

    I need to see some facts that Thomas CLARKE (1583 – ) and Rose KEREDGE (1587 – ) was Lt. William Clark’s parents from England….

    • markeminer says:

      Hi,
      I haven’t seen any documentary proof that Thomas and Rose were Lt. William’s parents so I have changed “were” to “may have been”

      Different versions of their history usually say they lived in Suffolk, but sometimes Norfolk, Kent or Bedfordshire with various dates. The most complete version shows:

      Rose Kerrich b. 13 Apr 1572 in Saxted Suffolk; d 19 Sep 1627 in Westhorpe, Suffolk

      Thomas Clarke b. 16 AUG 1578 in Finningham, Suffolk; d. 29 Jul 1627 in Westhorpe, Suffolk

      His father Thomas Clarke b. 4 Jan 1543 in Finningham, Suffolk; d. May 1588 in Westhorpe, Suffolk,

      His mother Dorothy Foxe b. 1545 in Finningham, Suffolk; d. 1576 in Suffolk

      His grandfather John Clarke b. 1503 in Suffolk; d. 3 May 1559 in Finningham, Suffolk,

  17. I have researched my ancestor William Clarke and this conforms to what I have read. I believe he arrived in 1633, and he was born in Beamminster, a town in Devonshire.

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  21. markeminer says:

    Marlene Wilkinson says: [In About]
    July 4, 2012 at 8:14 am (Edit)
    What is your reference for the first wife of Lt. William Clarke being a Strong?
    I am most impressed with your website.

    Hi Marlene,
    Little is known for sure about Sarah, not even her surname, or exact date and place of birth. Since her husband, William Clarke, is first noted in the town of Dorchester in 1635, and apparently arrived there from England unmarried, virtually every unmarried Sarah in Dorchester at that time, has been suggested. I have seen Strong, Holton, Bolton, Lambert, Lumbert, Smith and too many more to mention. What I haven’t seen is any positive proof for any of these. At present, all that has been proven of Sarah, is that she and William were admitted as Church members in Dorchester in 1636, resigned from that church to be admitted to the new church in Northampton, in 1666, that all of her children were born in Dorchester, and that she was a good and loving wife to William. There are several theories about William’s first wife Sarah:

    Mark Tyree believes Sarah Strong And Eleanor Strong (both born 1613 of Richard John STRONG) are the same person and that she arrived in America with her mother Eleanor and her stepfather William Cogan sometime before 1636.

    Robin Mitchell says Elder John Stronge is the son of John (Richard) Stronge and Eleanor Deane. John (Richard) Stronge died before the birth of his youngest child in 1613. This is well documented in his will.

    After John (Richard) Stronge’s death, his wife, Eleanor Deane, daughter of a tanner, married William Cogan (a tanner by trade) before the birth of John (Richard) Stronge’s offspring by Eleanor in 1613. Following a west country tradition, the daughter is christened “Eleanor,” after her mother. Though she is a “Stronge” by blood, William Cogan refers to her as “my daughter,” and raises her as such with the name Eleanor Cogan.

    Young (Elder) John Stronge learns the tanning trade from William Cogan and Eleanor Deane’s father, Walter Deane. Sarah Stronge, the future wife of Lt. William Clarke, was born in 1613 to Thomas Stronge, the brother of Elder John Stronge’s father. This makes Sarah Stronge the cousin of Elder John Stronge.

    An Ancestry.com user named hourglasssrs adds ”It appears from reviewing all the data that Sarah was born Strong; then her mother remarried a man named Holton (or Houlton) – thus she ended up being known by both names.” (I’ve updated William Clarke’s page with the story of the Holtons in Northampton)

    Some say that William married Sarah Strong earlier and he married Sarah Lumbert in 1636. (I think the Lumberts married different Clarkes, see William’s page for details)

  22. Mark Clark says:

    This is wonderful information. Im direct descendant of William Clark son of Thomas Clark and Rose Kerrich.WILLIAM (Poss. “I”) CLARKE
    Your 9th great grandfather
    Birth 06 FEB 1611 in Westhorpe, Suffolk, England
    Death Living
    Death 22 JUL 1681 in Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut

    • All I know is that my Grandmother was born in 1890, her grandfather born in Northampton,MA in 1820. His descendant was most likely a judge and selectman named Lt. Wm Clarke, born most likely in Beamminster, Dorchestershire in 1609. Pretty much everything is a guess.

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  24. Willard K. Morris says:

    I was interested to see that Lt. William Clarke has a coat of arms. Are you able to share documentation provided by the College of Arms? I am very interested in this because I and a number of my cousins are direct descendants of Lt. William Clarke and all his descendants named William Clark.

  25. Jim Clark says:

    I am trying to connect Wm Clark Sr & Jr to my Clark family in Canada. You state in this website that Capt. Wm Clark Jr had a son Benoni b: 1730 in Lebanon and he married Ruth Carpenter. There is another Benoni I am trying to confirm in my family which is Benoni b: 1737 to Daniel Clark & Esther Bridges. Can you confirm to me where and what records you found to have your Benoni married to Ruth Carpenter?

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Jim,

      It was actually Capt Wm. Clark Jr.’s great – grandson Benoni who married Ruth Carpenter. His father was also Benoni. Benoni was named for Benoni Jones who was indentured to his grandfather. Lt William Clark (the one on this page) until he came of age. It was stipulated that Clarke should “learn him to read and write and give him five pounds at the end of his term with sufficient clothing such as servants usually have and at the end of his time two suits of apparel”.

      See William’s son’s page https://minerdescent.com/2010/07/09/william-clark-sr/ (Sorry about my naming strategies in the line. I’m descended from three William Clarks in a row, which I didn’t know when I started naming the pages.

      Benoni is a rare name today, but I’ve seen it before in doing genealogy, so its probable yours is separate.

      This 1913 book “Some Descendants of Daniel Clark, of Windsor, Connecticut, 1639-1913” seens to have your line. Your Benoni is listed as follows: I don’t see further info on his family.

      109 iii Benoni, born Oct. 15, 1737.
      (Hines’ Early Lebanon.)

      http://archive.org/stream/clarkgenealogyso00walt/clarkgenealogyso00walt_djvu.txt

      My Clarks moved from Northampton, Mass to Connecticut, after a few generations, it appears yours immigrated directly to Windsor from England.

      I only have one Daniel Clark is this line, This William Clark’s great grandson – Daniel Smalley Clark b. 1721 Lebanon, New London, CT (Jonathan, William, William)

      I Believe I got the information about from ancestry.com, but my subscription is currently inactive; If you had a subscription, you can check my link on Benoni’s three children.

      Rgds, Mark

      • Willard K. Morris says:

        Mark, I posted an inquiry on 27 Nov 2013 (still there, unanswered) about the documentation of the coat of arms shown for Lt. William Clarke. Has this coat of arms been confirmed by the College of Arms in England? Have you any good evidence that it is in fact the coat of arms for Lt. William Clarke (1609-1690) who emigrated from England to Massachusetts about 1634? Please let all of us descendants know your basis for showing that particular coat of arms as being that of Lt. William Clarke.

  26. markeminer says:

    Hi Willard,

    I’ve changed the caption to “Clarke Coat of Arms” (Taking out the William part) Out of my 400+ immigrant families only a very small handful were gentry who qualified for arms at the time. We Americans come from yeomen stock by and large..

    Rgds, Mark

    • Willard K. Morris says:

      Thank you, Mark. There are a number of different Clarke coats of arms, each having been granted to particular individuals not necessarily related to each other. Perhaps it would be helpful to people who visit this web site for you to note that the example shown is not known to be that of Lt. William Clarke or any of his descendants. Without that disclaimer, we readers are led to infer that there is some connection between that coat of arms and our ancestor. From what you say, I now gather that Lt. William Clarke is not known to have been granted any coat of arms. I was surprised to learn in my own research that coats of arms are granted only to individuals, not to whole families. I think most of us unseasoned family researchers don’t realize this.

      • billybudd23 says:

        There is a long biography about Lieutenant William Clarke. His army title came from when he fought alongside my other ancestor John King at the Battle Of Turner Falls. He also had an incident with a slave named Jack. It is a common name and one was born in Beamminster, a small town in Dorset.

  27. penny says:

    Hello I have a long story, but keep it short. I have just found out I have two birth entries my first one shows my dad was Clark. I did the dna and two dna cousins who match me have the same family connections with William clark and Sarah strong. So somewhere I must match with the clark family. Has anyone done the DNA?? so we can do a few checks.

    • Willard K. Morris says:

      Hi, Penny. I descend from William Clarke, my immigrant ancestor from England in 18th century, and i have had an ethnicity DNA test done by AncestryDNA, which is public, likr my family tree. As my tree shows, I descend through all the William Clarks who descend from our English ancestor down to William Clark V, a leader in forming the colony of Naples, New York. One of his sons was Lorenzo Clark, who had a son named Bela Clark, who pioneered with several brothers and sisters in Kankakee County, Illinois. I am the grandson of his last-born daughter, Mildred Augusta Clark. Her daughter Yuri Alberta Clark, my mother, was the last of my ancestors to be born in Kankakee County. I believe my DNA result can be viewed, along with my family tree, which is public. Contact information below.

  28. In my post above, I incorrectly referred to my English immigrant ancestor William Clarke as having come to America in the 18th century. It was the 17th century. Willard “Bill” Morris

  29. This Clarke coat of arms is copyright of http://www.4crests.com. Please remove it, or at least add a link to our website and remove any advertising to outside companies, such as Ancestry.com…. This amounts to you using my images to collect ad dollars for yourself. Please cease and desist. You have quite a huge number of my graphics on your site at minerdescent.com

    Sincerely;
    Mike Kennaugh
    Owner
    http://www.4crests.com

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