Seth Richardson III

Seth RICHARDSON III(1778 – 1856) was Alex’s 5th Great Grandfather, one of 64 in this generation of the Shaw line.

Seth Richardson was born 27 Aug, 1778 in Attleboro, Bristol, MA,  His parents were Seth RICHARDSON II and Sarah FRENCH .  He married Susanna A. BALCOM on 29 Jul 1802 in Attleboro.  After Susanna died, he marrried Hannah [G___?]  Sanborn in Jan 1833 in Vassalboro, Maine. Seth died 18 Aug 1856 in Vassalboro, Maine, aged 78.

Susannah Balcom was born in 1781 in Atttleboro, Bristol, MA.  Her parents were Nathan BALCOM and Sarah JEWELL.  Susannah died 23 Feb 1832 in Vassalboro, Maine.

Hannah [G___?]  was born in  1783 in New Hampshire.   She first married Timothy Sanborn before 1814.    She had two daughters by her former husband, who married two of Seth Richardson’s sons, Amasa and John. In the 1870 census, she was living in Vassalboro with her son-in-law John Richardson and his second wife Cynthia.  Hannah died 29 Nov 1872 in Vassalboro, Maine, aged 88 years.

Children of Seth and Susanna:

Name Born Married Departed
1. Jason Seth Richardson 28  Mar 1803
Attleborough City, MA
Clarissa R. Wood
30 Jun 1833 Attleborough, Mass
1855 Freedom, ME
2. Susanna Richardson 5 Mar 1805
Attleborough City, MA
John Cummings
1832
19 Nov 1848
Freedom, Waldo, Maine
3. Sally Richardson 5 Apr 1807 Vassalboro Unmarried 1  Oct 1826 Vassalboro, Maine
4. Amasa Richardson 22  Jun 1809 Vassalboro Sophronia Sanborn
Nov 1837
Aft. 1885
Anoka, MN
5. Cynthia RICHARDSON 11 May 1811 Vassalboro Dudley COLEMAN 29 Oct 1829 China, Kennebec, Maine 9 Mar 1899 Vassalboro
6. John Richardson 7 Sep  1813 Vasalboro Hannah G. Sanborn
Oct 1837
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Cynthia Cross
2 Aug 1843
Vassalboro
22 Aug 1884 Vassalboro
7. Alfred W. Richardson 23 Sep 1815 Vassalboro Ellen Jane Brown Feb 1838 1893 Vassalboro
8. Ira Richardson 8 Apr 1819 Vassalboro Lucia Marble 26 Jun 1844 Vassalboro 1910 in Lacomb, Oregon
9. Eliza Richardson 24 Jan 1822 Vassalboro James Whitten Sylvester 1839 11 April 1913 Freedom, ME

Balcom can also be spelled Bolkcom, Balckom, Balkcom, Balkcon, Bolchum, Bolckcum, Bolckom, Bolckum, Bolcom, Bolkcome, Bolkcon, Bolkcum,  and Bolkom.

Seth Richardson came to Vassalboro from Attleboro, Mass., about 1799, with his wife, Susanna Balcom, and here built the first house on the Richardson farm, the frame of which was a part of Mr. Richardson’s residence until it was burned in June, 1891. Seth and Susanna Richardson had a large family of children. He died in 1856, aged seventy-eight. John (1813 1884) succeeded to the homestead and married Hannah Sanborn, deceased. His second wife was Cynthia Cross.  John’s son Seth B. (b. 1856) married Eliza C. Mosher, daughter of the late Elisha Mosher of China. Their children are: A.Gertrude, Guy M. and James Corey Richardson.

Seth lived in Attleborough a few years after marriage and removed about 1807 to Vassalborough, Me., on Kennebec River.

Two Seth Richardsons, Sr. and Jr served in the War of 1812.  Seth III was 36, his father Seth II was 59 and his son Seth IV was 11.  As far as we know Seth II lived and died in Attleborough, Bristol, Mass.  Capt. J. Wellington’s Company, Lieut. Col. E. Sherwin’s Regiment.  From Sept. 24 to Nov. 10, 1814. Raised at Albion, Kennebec Maine and vicinity. Service at Wiscasset.

Maine, then part of Massachusetts, was a base for smuggling and illegal trade between the U.S. and the British. Until 1813 the region was generally quiet except for privateer actions near the coast. In September, 1813, there was a notable naval action when the U.S. Navy’s brig Enterprise fought and captured the Royal Navy brig Boxer off Pemaquid Point. The first British assault came in July, 1814, when Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy took Moose Island (Eastport, Maine) without a shot, with the entire American garrison of Fort Sullivan surrendering.

Next, from his base in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in September 1814, Sir John Coape Sherbrooke led 500 British troops in the “Penobscot Expedition”. In 26 days, he raided and looted Hampden, Bangor, and Machias, destroying or capturing 17 American ships. He won the Battle of Hampden (losing two killed while the Americans lost one killed) and occupied the village of Castine for the rest of the war. The Treaty of Ghent returned this territory to the United States. The British left in April 1815, at which time they took 10,750 pounds obtained from tariff duties at Castine. This money, called the “Castine Fund”, was used in the establishment of Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Rank and Name.
Joel Wellington, Captain
Washington Heald, Lieutenant
Israel Richardson, Ensign
Robert Richardson, Sergeant
Charles Stratton, Sergeant
William Eames, Sergeant
Samuel Ward, Sergeant
Richard V. Hayden, Corporal
Nathaniel Merchant, Corporal
Andrew S. Perkins, Corporal
Benjamin Reed, Jr., Corporal
Odiorne Heals, Musician
John Kidder, Jr., Musician
Samuel Gibson, Musician

Privates include:
David Hawes
Ebenezer Hawes
Isaiah Hawes (Isaac HAWES’ cousin)
James Hawes
Seth Hawes
Andrew Richardson
Ebenezer Richardson
Seth Richardson
Seth Richardson, 2d

In the 1850 census, Seth and Hannah were farming in Vassalboro.  Seth’s son John, daughter-in-law Cynthia Cross and John’s five children were living with them.  One of these grandchildren, Mary F Ricardson married Oliver WEBBER‘s son Gustavus 20 May 1860 in Waterville, Kennebec, Maine.

Illustrated history of Kennebec County, Maine; 1625-1799-1892;. (page 136 of 151)

Seth B. Richardson, born in 1856, is a son of John Richardson (1813-1884), and grandson of Seth Richardson, who came to Vassalboro from Attleboro, Mass., about 1799, with his wife, Susanna Balcom, and here built the first house on the Richardson farm, the frame of which was a part of Mr. Richardson’s residence until it was burned in June, 1891. Seth and Susanna Richardson had a large family of children. He died in 1856, aged seventy-eight. John succeeded to the homestead and married Hannah Sanborn, deceased. His second wife was Cynthia Cross. Seth B. married Eliza C. Mosher, daughter of the late Elisha Mosher, of China. Their children are: A. Gertrude, Guy M. and James Corey Richards

In the 1860 census, Clarissa was a widow with three teenagers farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine. She was assisted by Rufus and Augusta Merrill. By 1870, her youngest son George had taken over as head of household to run the farm. In 1880, Clarrissa was living with her daughter Catherine Philbrick. In 1900, she was living with her son Jason and his new wife Mary. In 1910, she 97 years old and head of household again living with her grandson John’s family. Her husband had been dead for 55 years.

Jason Seth Richardson Gravestone Smithton Cemetery, Freedom, Waldo, Maine

Children

1. Jason Seth Richardson

Jason’s wife Clarissa R. Wood was born in 22 Jan 1814 – Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine. Her parents were Jason Wood Esq. and Desire Mayo. Clarissa died 5 Feb 1911 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine.

Children of Jason and Clarissa:

i. Jason Seth Richardson b. Oct 1833 in Waldoboro, Waldo, Maine; d. 24 Sep 1909 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine of heart disease; m1. Sep 1855 in Cumberland, Maine to Sarah F Clark (1838 Maine – bef. 1885); m2. Mary Adelade Chamberlain (b. Aug 1855 in Palmero, Lincoln, Maine – d. 1926 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine)

Jason registered for the draft in 1863, but I can find no record of service.

In the 1880 census, Jason and Sarah were farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine.

ii. Christopher Richardson b. 1840 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine

iii. Alfred W Richardson b. 1842 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. Jul 1861.

Alfred enlisted in Company B, Maine 4th Infantry Regiment on 15 Jun 1861. Mustered out  01 Jul 1861 at Hospital.  The regiment left Maine on June 20th and went into action, a month later, at the First Battle of Bull Run July 21 1861.  It seems more likely that Alfred died of wounds from Bull Run than of disease just two weeks after he was mustered in.

iv. Catharine L. Richardson b. May 1844 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 27 Mar 1935 in Seattle, King, Washington; m. 6 Jan 1870 Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts to Frederick Augustus Philbrick (b. Sep 1838 in Andover, Oxford, Maine – d. 4 Jun 1922 in Seattle, King, Washington) Frederick’s parents were James Philbrick (1810 – ) and Harriet Dunlap (1810 – ).

Frederick and Catherine moved to Seattle between 1890 and 1892. In the 1900 census, Catherine and Frederick were living in Seattle Ward 7, King, Washington where Frederick was a carpenter.

v. George M Richardson b. 1845 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. aft 1895 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; m. 23 Aug 1867 Cumberland, Maine to Mary Calista Monroe (b. Feb 1842 in Thorndike, Waldo, Maine – d. 1924 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine) Mary’s parents were Royal M Monroe (1815 – ) and Lydia [__?__]

In the 1880 census, George and Mary were farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine.

2. Susanna Richardson

Susanna’s husband John Cummings was born 1 Jan 1805 in Freedom, Maine. His parents were Benjamin Cummings and Hannah P Carr. After Susanna died, John married Mary E [__?__] (b. 1821 Maine). John died in Apr 1860 in Freedom, Maine

In the 1850 census, John and Mary lived in Freedom, Waldo, Maine. In 1860, Mary was a widow living with John’s sons John, Amasa, Isaac and Hugh.

Children of Susanna and John

i. John Stillman Cummings b. 8 Dec 1832 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 6 Mar 1871 – Freedom, Waldo, Maine in Freedon, Waldo, Maine; m. 24 Feb 1861 – Freedom, Waldo, Maine to Abigail H Bangs (b. 8 May 1839 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine – d. 9 May 1886) Abigail’s parents were Knowles Bangs (1805 – 1883) and Abigail Clark (1809 – 1856).

John registered for the draft in 1863, but I can find no record of Civil War service.

ii. Sylvester Wesley Cummings b. 16 Oct 1834 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 17 Jun 1864 in Morganza, Point Coupee, Louisiana of typhoid fever during the Civil War; m. 15 Oct 1863 Sullivan, Hancock, Maine to Ann Simpson Emery (1833 – )

Another Wesley Cummings (1837-1864) enlisted in Company B, Maine 20th Infantry Regiment on 29 Aug 1862. The 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment is famous for its defense of Little Round Top at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1863.  The 20th Maine’s action in holding the hill has been credited with helping to turn the tide of the war.  This Wesley died 5 May 1864 at the Battle of the Wilderness in Virginia.

Our Sylvester Wesley Cummings enlisted as a Sargent in Company B, Indiana 8th Cavalry Regiment on 29 Aug 1861.  Fought at the Battle of Stones River  from December 31, 1862, to January 2, 1863, in Middle Tennessee. Of the major battles of the Civil War, Stones River had the highest percentage of casualties on both sides. Although the battle itself was inconclusive, the Union Army’s repulse of two Confederate attacks and the subsequent Confederate withdrawal were a much-needed boost to Union morale after the defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg, and it dashed Confederate aspirations for control of Middle Tennessee.Mustered out on 16 Aug 1862, discharged disability.  Maybe this was a different Sylvester Wesley Cummings?

He was commissioned a Full 2nd Lieutenant in Company G, Maine 29th Infantry Regiment on 16 Dec 1863.   Fought on  8 Apr 1864 at Sabine Cross Roads, LA.  The battle was a decisive Confederate victory which stopped the advance of the Union army’s Red River Campaign.   Died of typhoid fever and mustered out on 17 Jun 1864 at Morganza, LA.  The regiment lost a total of 237 men during service; 2 officers and 40 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 4 officers and 191 enlisted men due to disease.

iii. Amasa Cummings b. May 1840 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 23 Apr 1910 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; m1. Laura H [__?__] (b. 1853 in Maine – d. 1891 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine); m2. 6 Nov 1892 Liberty, Waldo, Maine to Zenobia Voy (26 Sep 1865– 21 Feb 1942 Palermo, Waldo, Maine) Zenobia first married 4 Dec 1884 to Levi Plummer (b. 1859 – d. 8 Nov 1888).

Zenobia of Palmyra was a North African queen descended from Cleopatra who campaigned through much of North Africa before being defeated by Rome. Zenobia was the name of a character who drowned herself in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Blithedale Romance.”

Amasa enlisted in Company A, Maine 20th Infantry Regiment on 29 Aug 1862.

In 1989 members of the 1st Oregon Volunteer Infantry decided that they would portray Company A of the 20th Maine at their battle reenactments.

The soldiers of Company A came from nearly a dozen little towns that are scattered in the lower central portion of the state. Unincorporated townships such as Clinton, Sidney, Freedom, Winslow, Alton, Solon, Rome, Alfred, Pittsfield, Concord, Anson, and Belgrade are shown on the regimental roster for 1862. However, of the 98 soldiers that made up the original company, the largest number (23) came from the town of Waterville on the Kennebec River some forty miles from Portland, (Maine) and twenty miles each way from Brunswick and Augusta. The initial Captain of Company A (Isaac S. Bangs Jr.) [a relative of Amasa’s sister-in-law Abigail Bangs] and 1st Lieutenant Addison W. Lewis, both came from Waterville. Two Sergeants, George C. Getchell and Reward A Sturtevant plus three Corporals, William H. Low, Charles R. Shorey and David J. Lewis also came from this city of approximately 500 souls in 1862.

Of the total soldiers in Company A (98) Captain Bangs reported in November of 1862 that only 59 were fit for duty. John Pullen in his book “The Twentieth Maine” writes that the reason for these reduced numbers was disease contracted after the Battle of Antietam and unusually cold weather in Maryland during October of 1862. Like the rest of the inexperienced regiment, Company A was spared participation in the great battle of Antietam only to be devastated from exposure (they were without even shelter halves) and microbes made worse by camp life, poor diet and unsanitary conditions.

Captain Isaac Bangs Jr. enlisted as a private on August 9, 1862 but was appointed commander of Company A by Colonel Adelbert Ames on August 29, 1862 when the regiment was mustered into Federal service. He was a 31 year old married cashier at the time. Captain Bangs served until January of 1863 when he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and later served as Colonel of the 7th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery on garrison duty in defense of New Orleans, Louisiana until his honorable discharge in July of 1864. In March of 1865 he was given the title of Brevet Brig. General of U.S. Volunteers.

The 20th Maine is famous for holding the left flank of the Union line at Little Round Top, saving the Battle of Gettysberg and possibly the entire Civil War

The best known engagement for the 20th Maine was the Battle of Gettysburg. Company A took up position just to the right of where the battle line bent to the left. Casualties were approximately 30% for both the company and the regiment. The report of the state Adjutant General for December, 1863 shows the effects of the hard fighting. There were no commissioned officers for the company at that time. The report was filed by 1st Lieutenant William W. Morrell who was then commander of Company H. Of a total 83 soldiers only 31 were fit for duty. Howard L. Prince, a 22 year old school teacher from Cumberland, Maine, was initially the Regimental Quartermaster but was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in February of 1864 then Captain of Company A in December of that year.

That final year of the war was very hard on the 20th Maine and Company A. Very few of the “Boys of 62″ survived until the end in 1865. In his Spring campaign of 1864 General Grant called for the conversion of garrisoned forces of heavy artillery into infantry because of the terrible casualties at such places as Spotsylvania Courthouse, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. States such as Maine were called upon to convert units of coastal artillery to help depleted infantry regiments. In October of 1864 the records indicate that Company A received approximately 40 transfers from the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery which had been in state service until this time. The final numbers indicate only one commissioned officer (Captain Prince), two Sergeants, two Corporals and approximately 50-60 total enlisted soldiers who stood along that road at Appomattox Court House with General Joshua L. Chamberlain to accept the surrender of General Robert E. Lee’s ragged Army of Northern Virginia in April of 1865.

In the 1900 census, Amasa and Zenobia were farming in Palermo, Waldo, Maine.

iv. Isaac Cummings b. 17 Jun 1842 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 21 Aug 1862 in New Orleans, Louisiana

Isaac enlisted in Company B, Maine 14th Infantry Regiment on 04 Dec 1861. Promoted to Full Corporal. Fought at the Battle of Baton Rouge, a ground and naval battle fought in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana. Mustered out on 21 Aug 1862 at New Orleans, LA.

The 14th Maine Infantry Regiment was organized at Augusta, Maine and mustered in on Dec 31, 1861. The regiment left the state for Boston, Massachusetts on Feb 5, 1862, and there embarked on Feb 6 on the steamer “North America.” They arrived at Ship Island, Mississippi on March 8. The regiment was attached to Butler’s New Orleans Expeditionary Corps, Jan 1862.

The Regiment remained at Ship Island until May 19, 1862, then moved to New Orleans, Louisiana from May 19 to 25. They remained on duty there until July 7. They moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana on July 7. A . The Regiment participated in the Battle of Baton Rouge on August 5. The 14th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment is the focus of the poem “On the Men of Maine killed in the Victory of Baton Rouge, Louisiana” written by Herman Melville.

They moved to Carrollton on August 20, and remained on duty there until December 13, 1862

v. Hugh Anderson Cummings b. 18 May 1845 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 1933 Indiana; m1. 25 Mar 1869 – Cicero, Hamilton, Indiana, to Louise Merritt ((b. 27 Nov 1848 in Indiana – d. 1921 Indianapolis, Indiana) They were divorced before the 1900 census when Hugh was a boarder in Washington, Marion, Indiana.; m2. 1906 to Dovie [__?__] (b. 1861 Indiana)

Hugh enlisted in Company G, Maine 14th Infantry Regiment on 15 Mar 1865. Mustered out on 28 Aug 1865.

It is also said he served with the 8th Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Co. B

In the 1880 census, Hugh and Louisa were living in Cicero, Hamilton, Indiana where Hugh taught school.

Hugh Cummings and his cousin Elvira Gilbert (1845-1930)

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4. Amasa Richardson

Amasa’s wife Sophronia Sanborn was born in 1817.  Her parents were Timothy Sanborn and Hannah [__?__].  Her mother Hannah had become Amasa’s stepmother in 1833 when she married  Seth Richardson as his second wife.

Sophronia may come from the Greek meaning “prudent, self-controlled.” Some also relate the name to the Greek elements ‘sos’ (harmony) and ‘phonos’ (voice), or to ‘sophos/sophia’ meaning “wisdom, skill.” The male form of the name (Sophronius) was borne by several saints.

Child of Amasa and Sophronia

i. Charles G. Richardson b. May 1840 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 10 Jan 1918 in Millie Lacs, Minnesota; m1. 1870 to Georgianna Trask (Jul 1844 Maine – 1905); m2. 1906 to Annie (1881 Minnesota – ) Annie’s parents were born in Norway.

Charles removed to Anoka Minnesota, the same town where his cousin and our Richardson descendant, Guilford Dudley COLEMAN had a blacksmith shop.

In the 1900 census, Charles and Georgia lived in Ramsey, Anoka, Minnesota where Charles was a butcher.

5. Cynthia RICHARDSON (See Dudley COLEMAN ‘s page)

6. John Richardson

John’s first wife Hannah G. Sanborn was born 1818. Hannah died 1 Jan 1843.  Her parents were Timothy Sanborn and Hannah [__?__].  Her mother Hannah had become Amasa’s stepmother in 1833 when she married  Seth Richardson as his second wife.

John’s second wife Cynthia Cross was born 29 Apr 1823 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine. Her parents were Samuel Cross and Temperance Hawes. Her maternal grandparents were our ancestors Isaac HAWES and Tazmin WING. Cynthia died 22 Nov 1910 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

In the 1860 census, John was farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

Children of John and Hannah

i.Boardman Richardson b. 4 Jan 1839 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. Aft. 1920 census Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California; m. 28 Nov 1869 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to Lizzie M. Appleton (1850 – 1886); m2. 26 Sep 1886 Waltham, Middlesex, Massachusetts to Bertha Louise Rich (1862 – )

He was a registered voter in Fresno, Calif in 1892. Boardman was a carpenter in Fresno Ward 2, Fresno, California in the 1900 census. In 1910, he was a boat carpenter in Santa Cruz

ii. Mary Frances Richardson b. 18 Nov 1841 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 6 Jun 1870 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine;m. Gustavus Webber,( b. 16 Aug 1832 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine – d. 20 Jan 1917 in China, Kennebec, Maine) son of Oliver WEBBER and Abigail HAWES.

Oliver WEBBER‘s son Gustavus married John Richardson’s daughter Mary 20 May 1860 in Waterville, Kennebec, Maine. In the 1860 census, Gustavus and his bride were living with his father-in-law’s large family in Vassalboro. Gustavus enlisted as a Private on 14 August 1862 at the age of 28. in Co E -16th Maine and was wounded at Gettysburg. See Oliver’s page for his story.

Gustavus V Webber, wife Mary, daughter Alice, Photo taken about 1865 or 1866

Children of John and Cynthia

iii. Orson Franklin Richardson b. 15 Mar 1845 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 16 Oct 1862 in Smoketown, Maryland. Buried Antietam National Battlefield Site, Sharpsburg, MD 21782 Buried At: Site 3184

Orson F Richardson Gravestone

Orson was a Private in E Company of the 6th Maine Volunteer Infantry.

The 6th Maine Infantry was organized in Portland, Maine and mustered in for a three year enlistment on July 15, 1861. The regiment was attached to W. F. Smith’s Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October 1861. 2nd Brigade, Smith’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, IV Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, VI Corps, to February 1863.

The regiment left Maine for Washington, D.C., Jul 17 1861. Duty in the defenses of Washington, D.C., until Mar 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., Mar 10-15, 1862. Ordered to the Peninsula Mar 16. Advance toward Yorktown Apr 4-5. Siege of Yorktown Apr 5-May 4. Reconnaissance toward Yorktown Apr 6. Reconnaissance toward Lee’s Mills Apr 28. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Duty at White House until May 18. Duty near Richmond until June 6 and picket on the Chickahominy until Jun 25. Seven days before Richmond Jun 25-Jul 1. Gaines’ Mill Jun 26. Gold-Inn’s Farm Jun 27. Savage Station Jun 29. White Oak Swamp Bridge Jun 30. Malvern Hill Jul 1. [Orson F Richardson is listed at The Battle of Cedar Mountain, which took place on Aug 9, 1862]   Duty at Harrison’s Landing until Aug 15. Retreat from the Peninsula and movement to Centreville Aug 15-27. In works at Centreville Aug 27-31. Assist in checking Pope’s rout at Bull Run Aug 30, and cover retreat to Fairfax C. H. Sep 1. Maryland Campaign Sep-Oct. Sugar Loaf Mountain, Md., September 11-12. Crampton’s Pass, South Mountain, Sep 14. Battle of Antietam Sep 16-17. Duty in Maryland until Oct 29. The regiment lost a total of 255 men during service; 12 officers and 141 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded, 2 officers and 100 enlisted men died of disease.

Battle of Antietam by by Kurz & Allison, depicting the scene of action at Burnside’s Bridge

The Battle of Antietam also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South, fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and Antietam Creek, as part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Union soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties on both sides. Orson died a month later, perhaps of disease or maybe due to injuries.

iv. Ellen C. Richardson b. 4 Aug 1846 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 11 Feb 1929 in Salem, Essex, Mass; m. 12 May 1866 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to George Henry Jones (Aug 1845 Maine – 1922) George’s parents were Jeremiah Jones and Mary [__?__]. Ellen and George had five children born between 1867 and 1886.

In the 1900 census, George and Ellen were farming in Salem Ward 3, Essex, Mass

v. John Newton Richardson b. 15 Aug 1848 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 16 Nov 1932 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 16 Dec 1878 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to Mary A. Austin (b. 6 Mar 1862 in Vassalboro – d. 25 May 1924 in Vassalboro) John and Mary had four children born between 1882 and 1894.

John was a carpenter.

In the 1900 census, Newton and Mary were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

vi. Laurietta Rosemond Richardson b. 8 Aug 1850 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 24 Dec 1946 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 16 Jan 1881 – Kennebec, Maine to Charles Sumner Perkins (b. 10 Oct 1856 in North Berwick, York, Maine – d. 23 Jan 1927 in Vassalboro) His parents were William Perkins and Sarah Johnson

In the 1910 census, Charles and Laura were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

vii. Henry K. Richardson b. 8 Jun 1852 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 16 Aug 1934 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 1885 Waltham, Middlesex, Mass to Nellie Louisa Hicks (Feb 1861 Mass. – 1920) Nellie’s parents were Charles Benjamin Hicks (b. 1837) and Sybil W. Brooks (b. 1835).

In the 1900 census, Henry and Nellie lived in Waltham Ward 4, Middlesex, Mass. where Henry was a machinist.

viii. Clara Elizabeth Richardson b. 11 Feb 1854 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 19 Mar 1941 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 3 Jun 1871 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine- to Charles Israel Perley (1856 – 1927)

In the 1900 census, Charles and Clara were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

ix. Seth B. Richardson b. 25 Dec 1856 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 17 Apr 1930 in E. Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. Eliza Chatterton Mosher (b. 1 Apr 1862 in China, Kennebec, Maine – d. 10 May 1919 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine) Eliza’s parents were Elisha Mosher (1827 – 1882) and Sarah B Pierce (1927 – 1908).

Seth B. Richardson, born in 1856, is a son of John Richardson (1813-1884), and grandson of Seth Richardson, who came to Vassalboro from Attleboro, Mass., about 1799, with his wife, Susanna Balcom, and here built the first house on the Richardson farm, the frame of which was a part of Mr. Richardson’s residence until it was burned in June, 1891. Seth and Susanna Richardson had a large family of children. He died in 1856, aged seventy-eight. John succeeded to the homestead and married Hannah Sanborn, deceased. His second wife was Cynthia Cross. Seth B. married Eliza C. Mosher, daughter of the late Elisha Mosher, of China. Their children are: A. Gertrude, Guy M. and James Corey Richardson.

In the 1900 census, Seth and Eliza were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

x. Hamlin C Richardson (twin) b. 23 Dec 1860 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine’ d. After 1940 census Somerville, Middlesex, Mass; m. 1889 Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts to Jennie A Wood (b. Jan 1864 in Blackstone, Mass. – d. btw. 1927 and 1930 in Somerville , Middlesex, Mass) Jennie’s parents were Charles Wood and Sarah [__?__].

In the 1910 census Hamlin and Jennie lived in Somerville Ward 6, Middlesex, Massachusetts where Hamlin was a wholesale and retail meat dealer.

xi. Lincoln Hamilton Richardson (twin) b. 23 Dec 1860 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. Aft. 1940 census Waltham, Middlesex, Mass; m. 16 Jul 1888 Waltham, Middlesex, Mass to Bertha Elizabeth “Abby” Wallace (b. Jun 1862 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine – d. btw. 1923 and 1930 in Waltham, Middlesex, Mass.) Bertha’s parents were William J Wallace (1830 – ) and Elizabeth [__?__] (1829 – )

In the 1910 census, Lincoln and Bertha were living in Waltham Ward 6, Middlesex, Massachusetts where Lincoln was a machinist in a match factory.

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7. Alfred W. Richardson

Alfred’s wife Eleanor (Ellen) Jane Brown was born in 1818 or 1821 in Maine,. Her parents were Jonathan Brown (1797 – 1869) and Lydia P [__?__] (1797 – 1869) Eleanor died Orrington, Penobscot, Maine.

Children of Alfred and Ellen

i. George A Richardson b. 7 Sep 1838 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine; d. 4 Apr 1920 in Rockland, Knox, Maine; m. 1860 to Laura E King (b. Sep 1838 in Hebron, Oxford, Maine – d. 24 Mar 1905 in Rockland, Knox, Maine) Laura’s parents were Joseph King and Susan Huntley.

In the 1900 census, George and Laura were farming in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine.

ii. Seth Howard Richardson b. Aug 1844 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine; d. Aft. 1920 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine; m. 1867 Nellie (Helen, Ellen) F. Deering (Mar 1846 Maine – 1920)

In the 1880 census, Seth and Nellie were farming in Trenton, Hancock, Maine.

iii. Enoch Page Richardson b. Feb 1851 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine; d. 1909 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine,; m1. Rosa Hunt (1857 – 1888); m2. 1886 to Harriet (Hattie) V. Warner (11 Jul 1866 Maine – 20 Apr 1916 Burlington, Chittenden, Vermont)

In the 1900 census, Enoch and Hattie were farming in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine.

iv. Herbert E. Richardson b. 1859 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine; d. Bef. 1870 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine

v. Oscar U. Richardson b. 1860 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine; d. 1873 in Orrington, Penobscot, Maine

8. Ira Richardson

Ira’s wife Lucia Marble was born in 4 Jan 1828 in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine. Her parents were Coker Marble and Marcia Lewis. Lucia died 28 Jan 1906 in Lacomb, Linn, Oregon.

In the 1860 census, Ira was a shoemaker in Otisco, Waseca, Minnesota.

Children of Ira and Lucia

i. Alfredrick Richardson b. Nov 1849 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. Bet. 1910 and 1920; m. 1892 to Sarah Carrie Farrington (b. Jul 1863 in Waseca, Waseca, Minnesota – d. 14 Oct 1937 in Kelso, Cowlitz, Washington) Sarah’s parents were Serenus A Farrington (1826 – ) and Mary Foster (1843 – )

In the 1900 census, Alfredrick was farming in Lacomb, Linn, Oregon. His parents Ira and Lucia were living with him and his wife Sarah.

9. Eliza Richardson

Eliza’s husband James Whitten Sylvester was born 24 Jul 1820 in Freedom, Maine. His parents were Ebenezer Silvester and Hannah Whittier. James died 15 Sep 1908 in Freedom, Maine.

In the 1870 census, James and Eliza were farming in Albion, Kennebec, Maine.

Eliza F. Richardson Gravestone – Freedom, Waldo, Maine

Children of Eliza and James:

i. Ira R. Sylvester b. 13 Oct 1842 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine; d. 20 May 1910 in Washington, Knox, Maine; m. 1 May 1866 Freedom, Waldo, Maine to Mary Elizabeth Davis (3 Jan 1841 Maine – 14 Apr 1909 Fairview Cemetery, Jefferson, Lincoln County, Maine) Mary’s parents were Ambrose Davis (1810 – ) and Mary Gilpatrick (1807 – ).

Ira elisted in Company A, Maine 20th Infantry Regiment on 29 Aug 1862. Mustered out on 30 Jun 1865.    The 20th Maine marched from Appomattox, Virginia, on May 2, reaching Washington, D.C., on May 12, where it was mustered out of service on July 16, 1865.

The 20th Maine had an initial enrollment of 1,621 men, losing 150 dead from combat, 146 dead from disease, 381 wounded, and 15 in Confederate prisons.

The Maine 20th Volunteer Infantry Regiment  is famous for its defense of Little Round Top at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1863.  When the regiment came under heavy attack from the Confederate 15th Alabama regiment,  the 20th Maine ran low on ammunition after one and a half hours of continued fighting; it responded to the sight of rebel infantry forming again for yet another push at them by charging downhill with fixed bayonets, surprising and scattering the Confederates, thus ending the attack on the hill.

.

Had the 20th Maine retreated from the hill, the entire Union line would have been flanked, and would have most likely lost the battle of Gettysburg.  If the Union had lost the battle of Gettysburg the Confederate army could possibly been able to march on to Washington D.C. and end the war. The 20th Maine’s action in holding the hill has been credited with helping to turn the tide of the war.

20th Maine Reenactment Courtesy: 20th Maine Company B http://endued.tripod.com/index.html

In the 1900 census Ira was farming in Washington, Knox, Maine, his son Ernest was a lighthouse keeper.

ii. Hale P Sylvester b. 10 Sep 1844 in Unity, Waldo, Maine; d. 9 Jan 1937 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; m. May 1874 Champlin, Hennepin, Minnesota to Etta E Mears (1856 Maine – Aft 1910 Census )

Enlisted in Company G, Maine 14th volunteer Infantry Regiment on 15 Mar 1865. They marched to Augusta, Georgia from May 6 to 14, 1865 and then on to Savannah between May 31 and June 7. They then moved to Darien June 9–10. Mustered out on 28 Aug 1865. The regiment was mustered in for three year’s service on Dec 31, 1861 and were mustered out on Jan 13, 1865. It lost 86 killed or died of wounds and 332 died from disease.

In the 1880 census, Hale and Etta were farming in Champlin, Hennepin, Minnesota.

In the 1900 census, Hale was divorced and farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine

iii. Inez B. Sylvester b. Jun 1845 in Maine; d. 7 May 1935; m. May 1870 Freedom, Waldo, Maine to Charles A Carr (b. Sep 1845 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine – d. 3 Feb 1930 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine) Henry’s parents were Thomas J. Carr (1820 – 1898) and Sarah Jane Bailey (1823 – 1908).

In the 1900 census, Charles and Inez were farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine

iv. Benjamin Franklin Sylvester b. 23 Nov 1847 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1860 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine

v. Hannah Sylvester b. 1849 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine

vi. Auranna “Aura” Volevia Sylvester b. 11 Mar 1851 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine; d. 15 May 1945 Smithton Cemetery , Waldo County, Maine; m. 1870 to James Henry Thurston (b. 2 Oct 1840 in Danville, Maine – d. 12 Feb 1902)

In the 1900 census James and Aura were farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine.

vii. Lydia Sylvester b. 16 Mar 1855 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine; d. 19 Jan 1917 in Albion, Kennebec, Maine; m. 1888 to Ruel W Shorey (b. May 1840 in Albion, Kennebec, Maine – d. 2 Sep 1921 Libby Hill Cemetery, Albion, Maine) He first married Sarah Handy (1839 – 1877)

viii. James B. Sylvester b. Jul 1858 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; d. 15 Jan 1946 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; never married

ix. Eliza W. Sylvester b. Sep 1859 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; m. bef. 1893 to [__?__] Hussey (widowed with 7 year old Earl Hussey and living with brother Frank Sylvester in Freedom, Waldo, Maine in 1 1900 census

x. Elizabeth (Lizzie) M. Sylvester b. 1863 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine; m. 4 Mar 1900 Freedom, Maine to Wilson Wentworth (b. 20 Jun 1850 – d. 3 Dec 1918 Knox, Waldo, Maine) Wilson first married 25 Dec 1875 Freedom, Waldo, Maine to Florence M Busher.

In the 1900 census, Wilson and Lizzie were farming in Knox, Waldo, Maine.

xi. Frank Nelson Sylvester b. Dec 1866 in Albion Gore, Kennebec, Maine; d. 26 Sep 1906 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; m. 26 Jun 1897 Belfast Maine to Flora Isabella Wentworth (b. Aug 1877 in Maine – d. 10 Jul 1960)

Sources:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/i/n/William-M-Kinney-sr/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0027.html

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/4105122/person/-1651147486

http://www.geni.com/people/Seth-Richardson/6000000006802886939

http://dunhamwilcox.net/ma/attleborough_m1.htm

http://www.rays-place.com/town/ma/attleb/atte-birth-02.htm

http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.cross/2019.3.2.1/mb.ashx

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=21874163

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