Nathaniel Parks

Nathaniel PARKS (1738-1818) was Alex’s 6th Great Grandfather; one of 128 in this generation of the Miller line.  While we had 15 ancestral families who immigrated to and from Canada, the Parks were the only clan who were actually resettled loyalists.  When I was growing up, I thought all our American/Canadian/American ancestors were loyalists, but most just went to Canada for an opportunity.   See my post New England Planters in New Brunswick.

Nathaniel and his son Joseph fought in South Carolina against some other of our ancestors.  Almost all our ancestors are northerners, but we do have one group of Scotch/Irish Presbyterian Seceder ancestors who immigrated to  Ninety-Six District, later Abbeville County, and Chester County South Carolina in the late 1700′s, just in time for the Revolutionary War.  Our branch followed their minister Alex. Porter to Preble County, Ohio in the early 1800′s, supposedly to avoid contact with the institution of slavery, but before they left, the second generation fought in the Revolution.   For more details, see my post Carolina in the Revolution.

Loyalist Landing in Parrtown – The Harriet Irving Library at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, N.B. is a repository of Loyalist resources which is unique in Canada. The Loyalist Collection is a special collection on microfilm of North American colonial and early Canadian primary sources from approximately 1760 – 1840. The chief focus is directed toward the American Revolution and the early years of Loyalist settlement in British North America

Nathaniel Parks was born c. 1738 in Kingwood Township, Hunterdon Co., New Jersey His parents were Jonah PARKS and perhaps  Elizabeth PARLEE . He married Elizabeth PARLEE in 1760 some sources say in Canaan, Connecticut.    Nathaniel and his son Joseph enlisted in the loyalist 3rd Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers (known as Skinners Greens) on 6 June 1778.  Nathaniel was 40 when he enlisted and his son was 18 years old.  The N.J. Volunteers were relocated to Canada arriving in Parrtown New Brunswick  in Oct 1783 aboard the Duke of Richmond (Parrtown was renamed Saint John in 1785.  “Saint” is written out to distinguish it from St. John’s Newfoundland.).Both Nathaniel and Joseph are on the battalion land grant list for King’s County, New Brunswick on 14 July 1784.Nathaniel died in 1818 in New Brunswick, Canada

St John

Elizabeth Parlee was born in 1740 in Hunterdon, New Jersey.  Her parents were Jean PERLIER III and Abigail JONES. The Perlier family were from Staten Island, but, after the father’s death in 1723, the family, like many of their neighborns removed to New Jersey. They came by way of Perth Amboy, the Raritan and Millstone Rivers, and thence the branches of said rivers into Hunterdon Co. The Perliers were found in Amwell Township, and this probably is where Nathaniel met and married Elizabeth Perlier.  Her brother Peter Perlier, also, met and married Lydia Robbins in Amwell, as the Robbins family lived there also.  Elizabeth died in 1815 – Saint Martins, New Brunswick, Canada

Children of Nathaniel and Elizabeth, all born in Kingwood Township, Hunterdon County New Jersey

Name Born Married Departed
1. Joseph Parks c.1760 Along with his father, Joseph was one of the 73 participants in the four acre St. John River island rights grant.
2. John Parks 1765 Mary Dean
17 Aug 1799 Gagetown Anglican Church, NB
29 Aug 1854 St. George, Charlotte Co, NB
3. Jonathan PARKS 1767 Sarah Hannah BRADLEY
17 Jul 1793 Woodstock Anglican Church, Carleton, New Brunswick
1855
Easton , Aroostook Co, Maine
4. Sarah Parks 1768 or 1763 Josiah Foster
Mill Cove, Queens Co. NB 1783
or shortly before as her 1838 petition says she came to NB with her husband
1844
New Brunswick, Canada
5. David Parks 1770 Phoebe Ellis
15 Mar 1796 Gagetown Anglican Church, NB
between 1854 and 1861
St. George, Charlotte, NB
6. Mary Parks c. 1773 Henry Belyea
c. 1799
Oromocto, York, New Brunswick
4 Feb 1849 Greenwich Parish, New Brunswick
7. Nathan Parks 10 Jun  1775 Mary MacDonald
22 Jan 1802 Kings County NB
31 Dec 1843 St. Martins, New Brunswick, CA
8. Rachel Parks 1777 Silas Titus
27 Dec 1794 Gagetown Anglican, NB
After 1817

Historians’ best estimates put the proportion of adult white male loyalists somewhere between 15 and 20 percent. Approximately half the colonists of European ancestry tried to avoid involvement in the struggle — some of them deliberate pacifists, others recent immigrants, and many more simple apolitical folk. The patriots received active support from perhaps 40 to 45 percent of the white populace, and at most no more than a bare majority.

The largest number of loyalists were found in the middle colonies: many tenant farmers of New York supported the king, for example, as did many of the Dutch in the colony and in New Jersey. The Germans in Pennsylvania tried to stay out of the Revolution, just as many Quakers did. Highland Scots in the Carolinas stayed loyal to the king.

The Loyalists rarely attempted any political organization. They were often passive unless regular British army units were in the area. The British, however, assumed a highly activist Loyalist community was ready to mobilize and planned much of their strategy around raising Loyalist regiments. The British provincial line, consisting of Americans enlisted on a regular army status, enrolled 19,000 loyalists (50 units and 312 companies). Another 10,000 served in loyalist militia or “associations.” The maximum strength of the Loyalist provincial line was 9,700 in December 1780 . In all about 50,000 at one time or another were soldiers or militia in British forces, including 15,000 from the main Loyalist stronghold of New York.

Nathaniel Parks was a sergeant in Captain Thatcher’s company of the 3rd Battalion of the New Jersey Volunteers, which was commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen. (The battalion was redesignated as the 2nd Battalion after a regimental reorganization in 1781.)  This battalion served in the New Jersey/New York area until it was ordered south to join in the Southern Campaign. Col. Allen’s battalion served with distinction at the siege of Fort Ninety Six, South Carolina, and later participated in the bloody battle of Eutaw Springs, SC.

During and following the end of the American Revolutionary War in 1783, Loyalists (especially soldiers and former officials) could choose evacuation. Loyalists whose roots were not yet deeply embedded in the New World were more likely to leave; older people who had familial bonds and had acquired friends, property, and a degree of social respectability were more likely to remain in the US.

Approximately 10 to 15 % left (about 62,000 white Loyalists, or about 2 % of the total US population of 3 million in 1783). Many of these later emigrants were motivated by the desire to take advantage of the British government’s offer of free land, but many also were disillusioned by the continuing hostility to Tories and eventually decided to leave the new Republic.

Nathaniel’s eldest son, Joseph, served in the same outfit as his father and attained the rank of Corporal. For his service he was granted 200 acres in Sunbury County, New Brunswick, on 24 Feb 1785. Along with his father, Joseph was one of the 73 participants in the four acre St. John River island rights grant.

About 46,000 went to British North America. Of these 34,000 went to Nova Scotia, 2,000 to Prince Edward Island and 10,000 to Ontario.   7,000 went to Great Britain and 9,000 to the Bahamas and British colonies in the Caribbean.  The 34,000 who went to Nova Scotia, where they were not well received by the residents who were mostly descendants of New Englanders settled there between the Arcadian expulsion (1755-1763) and the Revolution. In 1784, the colony of New Brunswick was separated from  Nova Scotia for the 14,000  loyalists who had settled in those parts.

On May 18, 1785 the two towns of Carleton and Parrtown amalgamated to form the City of Saint John – Canada’s first incorporated city.

With the arrival of the Loyalist refugees in Parrtown (Saint John) in 1783, the need to politically organize the territory became acute. The newly arrived Loyalists felt no allegiance to Halifax and wanted to separate from Nova Scotia to isolate themselves from what they felt to be democratic and republican influences existing in that city.

They felt that the government of Nova Scotia represented a Yankee population which had been sympathetic to the American Revolutionary movement, and which disparaged the intensely anti-American, anti-republican attitudes of the Loyalists. “They [the loyalists],” Colonel Thomas Dundas wrote from Saint John, New Brunswick, Dec 28, 1786, “have experienced every possible injury from the old inhabitants of Nova Scotia, who are even more disaffected towards the British Government than any of the new States ever were. This makes me much doubt their remaining long dependent.  These views undoubtedly were exaggerated but there was no love lost between the Loyalists and the Halifax establishment and the feelings of the newly arrived Loyalists helped to sow the seeds for partition of the colony.

The British administrators of the time, for their part, felt that the colonial capital (Halifax) was too distant from the developing territories to the west of the Isthmus of Chignecto to allow for proper governance and that the colony of Nova Scotia therefore should be split. As a result, the colony of New Brunswick was officially created with Sir Thomas Carleton the first governor on Aug 16, 1784.

New Brunswick was named in honour of the British monarch, King George III, who was descended from the House of Brunswick (Haus Braunschweig in German, derived from the city of Braunschweig, now Lower Saxony). Fredericton, the capital city, was likewise named for George III’s second son, Prince Frederick Augustus, Duke of York.

The choice of Fredericton (the former Fort Anne) as the colonial capital shocked and dismayed the residents of the larger Parrtown (today’s Saint John). The reason given was because Fredericton’s inland location meant it was less prone to enemy (i.e. American) attack. Saint John did, however, become Canada’s first incorporated city and for a long time was one of the dominant communities in British North America. Saint John also found itself home to the American traitor Benedict Arnold; whose questionable local business dealings meant that the local Loyalists also came to despise him.

Nathaniel Parks Timeline

Before the War – Nathaniel Parks was found living on a 50 acre plantation in Kingwood Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey with his father Jonah Parks who also had 50 acres.  It is quite possible the children were all born there.

1760 – Nathaniel Parkes married Elizabeth Perlier/Parlee.

1767 – Nathaniel and Elizabeth living in West Jersy. Jonathan’s petition for land states he was born in West Jersey.

1777/78 – Nathaniel Parkes paid taxes on land in Kingwood Township, but, no deed has been found. However, he may have had a deed, not registered, and as a result of Nathaniel joining the King’s army his property would be confiscated. see Nov. 22, 1777 ‘Congress recommended the confiscation of all Loyalist estates.’

1778 – Nathanile Parkes joined 2d NJ Vol., as a Sargent. Joseph Parkes, eldest son of Nathaniel Parkes joins the same regiment on the same day.

6 June 1778 – Nathaniel Parks was enlisted by Captain Peter Campbell for his company in the 3rd Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers (known as Skinners Greens) on  Joseph Parks enlisted as a sergeant in the same company and battalion and on the same date, except that he was enlisted by Lieutenant Bartholomew Thatcher. Both Campbell and Thatcher were from Hunterdon County, New Jersey and the dates of enlistment of the men in their company suggest that the men were enlisted during the British march from Philadelphia to Sandy Hook.

1778 – Sargent, Capt. Bartholomew Thatcher’s Co., 3rd NJV commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen, Staten Island.

In the muster of 31 Aug 1778 however, Nathaniel Parks is listed as the sergeant and Joseph Parks as a private, in now Captain Bartholomew Thatcher’s Company. This was the same company as before, except Peter Campbell did not have the command, as there was much confusion over his eligibility for rank.

Oct 1778. Sargent, Capt. Bartholomew Thatcher’s Co., 3rd NJV commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen, Staten Island.. Staten Island.

29 Dec 1778 – Both Parks sailed with the expedition to take Savannah, Georgia  They subsequently took part in the Franco- American Siege of that city in Sep/Oct 1779.

29 Nov 1779 – They were both listed as sick in quarters, Joseph now promoted to corporal, both still serving in the same company and battalion. Sargent, Capt. Bartholomew Thatcher’s Co., 3rd NJV commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen, Staten Island.. Savahnah.

Both Parks continued in this situation through 1780 and into 1781.

July 1780 – The battalion march in  from Savannah to Augusta, Georgia, and shortly thereafter to Ninety Six, South Carolina. At Ninety Six there were numerous small expeditions and skirmishes, which they may have taken part in. Ironically, another of our ancestors, James McCAW lived in the Ninety Six area and fought for the American side in the South Carolina campaign, see his page for an account of the battles.

May and Jun 1781 – Nathaniel and Joseph took part in the Siege of Ninety Six by the Rebel forces under [our possible relative]  General Nathanael GREENE  , and the immediate evacuation of that post after the lifting of that event.

8 Sep 1781 – They also took part in the very bloody Battle of Eutaw Springs, South Carolina,.  Though half the British forces were killed, wounded or captured, the Parks survived apparently unscathed. At this time they were serving in the same company but the battalion had just been renumbered to the 2nd. This was due to the “old” 2nd battalion being under strength and drafted into the 1st and late 4th battalions.

25 Oct  – 24 Dec 1781. Sargent, Capt. Bartholomew Thatcher’s Co., 3rd NJV commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen, Staten Island.. Charlestown.

25 Apr  – 24 Jun 1782. 2nd NJV. Capt. Bartholomew Thatchers Co.

The two Parks were in their same situation, company and battalion at Charlestown in the April 1782 muster. They would continue there until the city was evacuated by the British in Dec 1782, when they sailed back to the British garrison at New York. Joseph Parks was sent with an advance party of the battalion to Nova Scotia with the fleet in the Spring of 1783.  There he remained until joined by Nathaniel and the rest of the battalion that did not take their discharge at New York.

24 Jun  – 27 Aug 1783. 2nd NJV. Commanded by Major Robert Drummond. Sick in quarters.

25 Aug – 24 Oct 1783. 2nd NJV. Commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen.

10 Oct 1783 – The battalion was disbanded and they were discharged on that day.

A Plaque that represents the Landing of the Loyalists which is at the mouth of the St John River in St John New Brunswick. At the time of the landing this area was known as Nova Scotia.

Oct 1783 – Came to Canada on ship, ‘Duke of Richmond’.

Parks, Nathaniel Source: LLC w: Elizabeth Parlee. Child: John, Jonathan, David, Mary, Nathan, Sarah, Rachel. Fr: New Jersey ? Stl: St. Martins, NB, CA Reg: Sargent in 2nd, NJ Volun.

The N.J. Volunteers arrived in Parrtown in Oct  1783 aboard the 865 ton warship Duke of Richmond, captained by Richard Davis.

14 Jul 1784. – Both are on the battalion land grant list for King’s County, New Brunswick.

New Brunswick Counties

21 Jul 1784 – Grant #113, Kingsclear, Sunbury Township, Block 2 (for NJV).

1784 – Loyalist Settlement List Return of People, near Long’s Creek, 2nd NJV:

Parks, Nathaniel: 1 man, 1 woman, 6 children over 10, 1 under 10.

24 Feb 1785 – Nathaniel received a grant of 600 acres in Sunbury County, NB on He was also one of 73 individuals who were granted four acres, designated as “Island Rights”, on an island in the St. John River, NB. This grant was dated 08 Aug 1789. I believe the island in question is in the vicinity of Frederickton.

1 Feb 1788 – Petition #282, land purchased from William Mills lying between Thomas Nay and Phillis Creek.

3 Aug 1789 – Grant #201, islands in Saint John River, Fredericton. Grant recalled and regranted 1 Feb 1793.

23 Oct 1790 – purchased lot #10, Dibbles Survey, 3rd range, Queens County. Witnessed by David Parke.

4 Oct 1799 – Grant recalled and regranted.

9 Jan 1802 – sale of lot #10 Dibbles Survey, 3rd range.

26 Feb 1823 – Named in petition #1121, John MacDonald, regarding land on road to Belleisle from Washademoak.

Children

1. Joseph Parks

1778 – Nathaniel Parkes joined 2d NJ Vol., as a Sargent. Joseph Parkes (age 18), eldest son of Nathaniel Parkes joins the same regiment on the same day.

6 Jun 1778 – Nathaniel Parks was enlisted by Captain Peter Campbell for his company in the

3rd Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers (known as Skinners Greens) . Joseph Parks enlisted as a sergeant in the same company and battalion and on the same date, except that he was enlisted by Lieutenant Bartholomew Thatcher. Both Campbell and Thatcher were from Hunterdon County, New Jersey and the dates of enlistment of the men in their company suggest that the men were enlisted during the British march from Philadelphia to Sandy Hook.

In the muster of Aug 31, 1778 however, Nathaniel Parks is listed as the sergeant and Joseph Parks as a private, in now Captain Bartholomew Thatcher’s Company.

Oct 1778 – Joseph Parks participated in the successful raids on Egg Harbor, New Jersey under Captain Patrick Ferguson and the subsequent surprise of Pulaski’s Legion.

Both Parks sailed with the expedition to take Savannah, Georgia, which was effected on 29 Dec  1778. They subsequently took part in the Franco- American Siege of that city in Sep/Oct 1779. They were both listed as sick in quarters on Nov  29, 1779, Joseph now promoted to corporal, both still serving in the same company and battalion.

Both Parks continued in this situation through 1780 and into 1781. During that period the battalion march in July of 1780 from Savannah to Augusta, Georgia, and shortly thereafter to Ninety Six, South Carolina. At Ninety Six there were numerous small expeditions and skirmishes, which they may have taken part in. Ironically, another of our ancestors, James McCAW lived in the Ninety Six area and fought for the American side in the South Carolina campaign, see his page for an account of the battles. Nathaniel and Joseph took part in the Siege of Ninety Six by the Rebel forces under [our possible relative] General Nathanael GREENE through May and June of 1781, and the immediate evacuation of that post after the lifting of that event. They also took part in the very bloody Battle of Eutaw Springs, South Carolina, on 8 Sep 1781, surviving apparently unscathed. At this time they were serving in the same company but the battalion had just been renumbered to the 2nd. This was due to the “old” 2nd battalion being under strength and drafted into the 1st and late 4th battalions.

The two Parks were in their same situation, company and battalion at Charlestown in the April 1782 muster. They would continue there until the city was evacuated by the British in Dec 1782, when they sailed back to the British garrison at New York. Joseph Parks was sent with an advance party of the battalion to Nova Scotia with the fleet in the Spring of 1783.  There he remained until joined by Nathaniel and the rest of the battalion that

did not take their discharge at New York. The battalion was disbanded on 10 Oct 1783 and they were discharged on that day.  Both  are on the battalion land grant list for King’s County, New Brunswick on 14 Jul 1784.

Along with his father, Joseph was one of the 73 participants in the four acre St. John River island rights grant.

Nothing more about Joseph has been published. Perhaps he died soon after.

2. John Parks

John’s wife Mary Dean was born about 1775. She married John 17 Aug 1799 in Anglican Church, Gagetown, New Brunswick, Canada. Mary died in 1871 in Charlotte, New Brunswick, Canada.

23 Oct 1790 – Purchased lot 10 Dibbles Survey, 3rd Range, Queen’s Co., NB This was witnessed by David Parke. On Jan 9, 1802 this lot was sold.

John was living next to his brother David in St. George’s Parish, St. Charlotte County in the 1851 census.
Parks John M Head 86 N.B. Farmer Infirm
Parks Mary F Wife 66 N.B.
Parks John M Head 28 N.B. Labourer
Parks Ann F Wife 28 N.B.
Parks Mary Jane F Daughter 8 N.B.
Parks Nathaniel M Son 6 N.B.
Parks Abilgail F Daughter 4 N.B.
Parks Louisa F Daughter 1 N.B.

Children of John and Mary

i. John Parks b. 1823; d. 1859; m. 8 Nov 1841 Saint George, Charlotte County, New Brunswick to Mary Ann Hatt (b. 1823 – d. 1881)

3. Jonathan PARKS (See his page)

4. Sarah Parks

Sarah’s husband Josiah Foster was born 11 Jun 1758 in Elizabeth, New Jersey (this may be a baptism as he is given as b. in St. John’s Church). His parents were Ebenezer Foster (b. 1731 Woodbridge, New Jersey – d. 10 Dec 1787 Kings, NB) and Mary Beach (b. 1729). His grandparents were Stephen Foster and Martha Van Galen. Josiah died 9 Nov 1833 in Waterborough Parish, Queens, New Brunswick, Canada.

Ebenezer was of Dutch descent.t. He was a Loyalist. His Property in Middlesex Co., New Jersey confiscated 1 May 1787. He obtained land on an island in the Long Reach called the ‘Isle of Pines’. This later became known as Foster’s Island.’ “Ebenezer Foster was a member for Kings county in the first house of assembly.”

Owned lots 3,4,5 Mill Cove, Parish of Waterborough, Queens Co. xxx

Josiah was a Corporal in the 2nd New Jersey Volunteers, came to New Brunswick with his regiment on the Duke of Richmond bound for the River Saint John.  According to one of Sarah’s petitions for widow’s benefits, he served for seven years. He received a grant of land above Fredericton, only to have it escheated ( a common law doctrine which transfers the property of a person who dies without heirs to the crown or state). Josiah Foster, Nathaniel Parks and Joseph Parks in a list of names of officers and men of the 2nd Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers, who received grants of land in King’s County, New Brunswick. Dated 14 July 1784

Josiah married Sarah Park and had nine children so states her petition for assistance in 1839, this was a pension given to ‘Old soldiers and widows of the soldiers of the Revolutionary War’. (RS566 I2/1 1839)

Josiah later received three lots of land on the Grand Lake, very near to where some of the Parke family settled. This property had a nice stream running through it, so Josiah built the firs saw mill in the area and the village became known as ‘Mill Cove‘. The saw mill later burned and then Josiah built a grist mill on the same site.

Josiah and Sarah’s family scattered and the property was sold, the will probate only lists five children. Some may not be living at that time

17 Jan 1838 – Petition of Sarah Foster, widow of the late Josiah Foster who ???? with Revolutionary War pray my for Legislation aid. Discharge and certificate of character enclosed.

To His Excellency Major General, John Harvey RCH and CB Lieutenant Govenor and Commander in Chief of the Province of New Brunswick, To the Honorable President and Member of Her Majesties Legislative Council and the Humble Speaker and Members of the House of Assembly. Humbly herewith,

That your Petitioner is the widow of Corporal Josiah Foster who served for the term of the Seven Years in the 2 Batt NJ Volunteers during the American Rebellion as by reference to the annexed discharge will more fully appear that your Petitioner came to this Province with her Late husband with the Loyalists, that she had reared a family of nine children, that she is now upwards of seventy four years of age and is living on the affectionate bounty of one of her sons. She therefore humbly trusts that the liberality of the Legislature will be extended to her that may be afforded to ???? in her situation and as in duty bound with every way. Sarah Foster. X for her mark.

I hereby certify that my mother has lived with me since the death of my late father and belive that the above petition to be correct. Signed John Foster

Children of Sarah and Josiah (In her pension petition, Sarah claimed she had nine children so there were three more in addition to those listed below)

i. Samuel Foster m. 27 Aug 1801 to Anne Sims. Samuel Foster and Anne Sims of Waterborough Parish, Queens Co., NB were married probably in Gagetown Anglican Church.

It is assumed here, because of the time and location, that Samuel was Josiah’s son. This assumption may not be correct. A Samuel Foster petitioned for land in Queens Co. with Patrick O’Hara in 1804; and alone in 1818. Other petitions were in 1822 in Kings Co. and in 1857 in Kings Co. The 1822 petition seems to have been granted, resulting in 200 acres in Sussex Parish granted to Samuel Foster 18OCT1822. In 1868, in Carleton Co., Samuel Foster with: Jerusha Foster, John B. Foster, Maria Foster, Maude Foster and Sarah Foster petitioned for land.

ii. Joshua Foster b. ca. 1792.

With Josiah Foster and William Peters, a Joshua Foster petitioned for land in Queens Co. in 1815; and in Queens Co. in 1820, with Josiah Foster, William Peters, Charlotte Peters and James Brittain. In 1824, Joshua Foster applied for land in Queens Co. with Josiah Foster, Cushi Hatheway, James Brittain and William Peters. It is not clear if this Joshua was Josiah’s son, or the uncle of the same name. Joshua Foster petitioned alone in Queens Co. in 1847.

iii. John Foster b. ca. 1794, d. 1860 Mill Cove, Waterborough Parish, Queens Co., NB

A John Foster m. Westfield Parish, Kings Co., NB 3 Apr 1825 Catherine Armstrong. Both were of Westfield Parish. Whether this is the same John is uncertain. Another, or the same, John Foster m. 22 Nov 1832 Sarah Tufts. Again, both were of Westfield Parish. Witnessed his mother’s receipt for her £10 pension in Queens Co., NB in 1839.

iv. Stephen Foster b. ca. 1794, m. 25 Feb 1812 St. John’s Anglican Church, Gagetown, NB (or in Wickham Parish, Queens Co., NB) to Catherine Evans.

Stephen Foster, presumably s/o Josiah, Ebenezer’s son, was apparently living in Waterborough Parish, Queens Co., NB in 1816, with a wife, Catherine, when his son, William Josiah Foster (b. Sep 1814) was baptized in Gagetown in 1816. Obviously, this William was too young to be the one we seek, but suggests we are on the right track. Clues suggest that it may be Stephen’s will of 1833 (rather than Josiah’s) that mentioned that his brother (after whom he may have named his son), William, pre-deceased him. (Hence, that William d. before 1833.)

v. William Foster b. ca. 1794, d. before 1833. Possibly William Josiah Foster m. Elizabeth Flewelling.

vi. Frances Foster b. ca. 1801, m. 30 Oct 1829 Grand Lake, Queens Co., NB to Dr. James Wood (b. Canning Parish, Queens Co., NB ca. 1804)

vii. Elizabeth Foster b. 1813 in New Brunswick; d. Aft. 1881; m. 27 Oct 1831 Wickham Parish, Queens, New Brunswick, Canada to her first cousin Benjamin Titus (b. 1808 in NB Canada; d. 1876) (son of Silas Titus and Rachel Parks See below)

In March, 1829 Benjamin was twice sued. Jonathan Yerxa of Douglas Parish [York Co., NB] asked to be paid £15 for diverse goods he had furnished, while John Simpson of Fredericton demanded £44 payment for the same from Benjamin and George Titus.

After their marriage, Benjamin Titus, Jr. purchased land on the Den Road in Cambridge parish. He and his sons were listed as farmers there in 1861. Benjamin Titus died sometime between 1871, when he was still living with his family in Cambridge, and 1881 when Elizabeth was enumerated as a widow, supported by the labor of her sons Benjamin and Charles, still resident on the homestead. She died before 1891, when the family disappears from the Queens County census, probably before 1884, when her sons moved to Saint John.

5. David Parks

David’s wife Phoebe Ellis was born 1769. Her parents were William Ellis and Margaret [__?__]. Phoebe died in New Brunswick, Canada

13 Mar 1802 – Complaint against David Parks by John Watson re lot #11, Queens Co.

22 Mar 1802 – memorial for lot #11, SE side Washademoak Lake, Queens County.

7 Jun 1803 – Quitclaim lot #11 from David Park to John Watson.

11 Jun 1804 – Quitclaim for lots #10, 11 & 12 at Washademoak Lake, Queens Co.

29 Dec 1818 – Petition for land, Parish of Waterborough. (same lot as brother Nathan: alloted to Samuel Fairweather, Jr.)

24 May 1819 – Signed a document in support of the building of Holy Trinity Church, Springfield, Kings Co.

4 Sep 1824 – Petitoned for 400 acres in the Parish of Wickham.

16 May 1827 – Bought lot #4, Parish of Wickham.

26 May 1846 – Sold lot #4, Parish of Johnston (same lot as above).

David was living with his son Jonah and next to his brother John in St. George’s Parish, St. Charlotte County in the 1851 census.
Parks Jonah M Head 41 N.B. Cooper
Parks Mary Ann F Wife 33 N.B.
Parks George M Son 5 N.B.
Parks Mary F Daughter 2 N.B.
Parks Phoebe Ann F Lodger 10 N.B.

Parks David M Father 81 N.B.

Children of David and Phoebe:

i. Mary Parks b. 20 Sep 1797 in Wickham, Queens, New Brunswick, Canada; 1 Feb 1877 Queens, NB; m. 28 Oct 1817 in Queens, NB to Daniel Slocum (b. 22 Feb 1797 in Hamstead, New Brunswick – d. 12 Jun 1885 in Queens, NB) His parents were Ebenezer Slocum and Esther Corey. Daniel and Mary had 8 children.

ii. Hannah Parks b. 23 Oct 1798 in York, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 29 Aug 1836 Kingston, New Brunswick, Canada; m. 29 Mar 1819 in Queens, NB to Jesse Cromwell (b. 1 May 1797 in Springfield, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada – d. 1860 in Johnston Parish, Queens, New Brunswick) Hannah and Jesse had nine children. After Hannah died, Jesse married Hannah Redstone (b. Devon, England on 1814) and had 5 more children.

iii. Nancy Parks b. 1802 in Queens, Canada; m. 4 Sep 1825 in Queens, NB to James Mullin (b. 1789 in Springfield, New Brunswick, Canada – d. 22 Dec 1855 in Wickham, New Brunswick, Canada) Nancy and James had had 6 children. After Nancy died, James married Susanna Hurder and had another child.

iv. William Parks b. 1807 in Moose Island, Main River; d. 3 Jan 1881 Cambridge Narrows, New Brunswick; m. 23 Jul 1835 in Queens, NB to Harriett Knight (b. 17 May 1817 in Burton, Sunbury, New Brunswick, Canada – d. 24 Jul 1898 in Cambridge Narrows, New Brunswick) She was Phoebe’s sister. Her parents were Samuel Knight and Sophia Holland. William and Harriet had 6 children.

v. Jonah Parks b. 1810 in Queens, NB; d. 30 Sep 1878 York, NB; m. 11 May 1845 in Queens, NB to Mary Ann Parks (b. 1818) Jonah and Mary Ann had 4 children

vi. Frances Amelia Parks b. 1811 in Queens, Canada; d. 1871; m. 30 Sep 1840 in St John, New Brunswick to David Mansfield Wort (b. 1815 in Saint John, New Brunswick – d. 1881 in New Brunwsick) His parents were Henry Wort and Esther Slocum. Frances and David had 6 children.

vii. Sarah Parks b. 25 Jul 1815 in Springfield, Kings, New Brunswick; d. 1901 New Brunswick

viii. Daniel D Parks b. 1818 in Waterborough, Queens, Canada; d. 1886 Union Settlement, New Brunswick; m. 29 Jul 1840 in Queens, NB to Phoebe Knight (b. 22 May 1821 in Burton, New Brunswick – d. May 1912 in Union Settlement, New Brunswick) She was Harriet’s sister. Her parents were Samuel Knight and Sophia Holland. Daniel and Phoebe had 15 children

6. Mary Parks

Mary’s husband Henry (Hendrick) Belyea was born 1766 in Cortland Manor, Westchester, New York. His parents were Hendrick Belyea and Engeltje Storm. Henry died 1851 in Greenwich Parish, New Brunswick.

Bilyea, Belyea, Bulyea are just three of the family names of descendants of Louis Boulier (born 1672 in Saintonge, France), a French Huguenot who fled religious persecution in France and ended up becoming part of the early Dutch community in what is now New York. We know very little about Louis, other than that he may have lived in the Netherlands before coming to North America.

Henry’s grandfather, father and brothers were tenant farmers at Philipsburg Manor in Tarrytown NY. Philipsburg Manor is open to tourists today.

Henry and his four brothers served with the British Army during the American Revolution. One of them was taken prisoner. The family lost all of its property and farms in New York because they sided with the losing forces, so the British paid to resettle them in Canada. On April 26, 1783, a fleet of twenty ships carried 7,000 Loyalists from New York City to Nova Scotia.

A legacy of the family lives on in New Brunswick in the form of “Belyea’s Cove” [covered with ice in this Google Maps Satellite View]. in the Saint John River Valley on Washademoak Lake. There is also a Belyeas Point in NB. Belyea’s Point Lighthouse, an 11 metre tall landfall lighthouse located along the Saint John River, near the community of Morrisdale, was built in 1881.

Henry owned land in Parish of Greenwich, Kings Co.

Children of Mary and Henry

i. Robert Belyea b. 1 Jul 1793 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 19 Aug 1877 Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick; m. 22 Nov 1822 in Kings, New Brunswick to Margaret A Hawthorne (b. 1800 in Ireland – d. 13 Jul 1888 in Kings, NB) Robert and Margaret had eight children born between 1824 and 1840.

ii. Henry Belyea b. 1796 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 18 Apr 1879 Oak Point, Kings, New Brunswick or Petersville Parish, Queens County, New Brunswick

m1. 18 Oct 1819 in Saint John, Saint John County, New Brunswick to Mary Ann Day or Archibald (b. 1799 – d. 1829); Henry and Mary Ann had five children born in Kingston, Kings, NB between 1820 and 1828.

m2. 10 Jan 1831 in Greenwich Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick to Elizabeth Jane Belyea (bapt. 23 Jan 1803 Greenwich Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick – d. 17 Oct 1882 in Petersville, Queens, New Brunswick) Elizabeth Jane’s parents were Robert Belyea (1 Jul 1765 in Van Courtland, Westchester County, New York – d. 6 Sep 1830 Greenwich Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick) and Prudence Holly (b: 1770 in New York – d. 2 Feb 1861 Long Reach, Greenwich Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick) Prudence was one of the company of Loyalist who came to this country at the commencement [sic] of the American Revolution. Henry and Elizabeth Jane had eight children between 1831 and 1846.

iii. Elizabeth Belyea b. 1798 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; m. 8 Jun 1845 in Kings, NB to Richard Graves (b. 1797 in New Brunswick, Canada)

iv. Nathaniel Parks Belyea b. 7 May 1800 in Kings, NB; d. 12 Nov 1857 Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick, Canada; m. 18 Sep 1824 in York, NB to Abigail Kinney (b. 1810 in Oromocto, Sunbury, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 1881 in Carleton, NB) Her parents were Stephen Kenney and Merab Ives. Nathaniel and Abigail had 13 children between 1825 and 1856. After Nathaniel died, Abigail married William Seeley (1821 – 1880)

v. Sarah Belyea b: in Oak Point, Kings County, New Brunswick Province, Canada c: 8 Aug 1802 in Greenwich Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick Province, Canada; m. 8 Nov 1827 in Kings County, New Brunswick to Frederick Pace (b. 27 Jan 1806 in Loudon County, Virginia or Rawdon, Hants County, Nova Scotia – d. 1879)

Frederick’s parents were Darius Pace (ca 1750 Georgia – 1823 Musquodoboit, Halifax, Nova Scotia) and Dorothy Raines (b. 1768 Wales – d. 1873 Nova Scotia). In July, 1784, the Paces arrived in Nova Scotia via Florida from Georgia They lived at Rawdon, Hants County, Nova Scotia which may be where Frederick’s birth of “Loudon Virginia” comes from. The first settlers in the Rawdon Township, Nova Scotia were United Empire Loyalists who had to flee their home in Ninety Six, South Carolina. The Rawdon loyalists as well as members of the 2nd American Regiment, were relocated from South Carolina to Rawdon, Nova Scotia after their defeat by General Nathanael GREENE in the Siege of Ninety-Six in th American Revolution (See my post Carolina in the Revolution).

James was a Loyalist who migrated to Nova Scotia and Darius followed his older brother. Because of James’ political opinion during the Revolutionary period, all of his personal and real property was confiscated, he was convicted of treason, his arrest was authorized by the Georgia Council for Safety on 12 January 1776, and he was exiled from Georgia for life.

Darius followed his loyalist brother James to Nova Scotia. James Pace left Georgia with wife, Aurelia and three of his children, Willis, Drury and Thomas, destination Nova Scotia where James died shortly thereafter. Darius and Dorothy Raines of Wales were the parents of 10 children: Frederick, James, Sarah A., Richard, Darius, George, Edward, Charlotte, Shadrach and Jack. Descendants of James and Darius are scattered throughout the United States and Canada. The history of James and Darius, PACE, A FAMILY HISTORY AND LINEAGE, covers a period from ca. 1778 to Frederick Augustus Clouter, 1991.

Many genealogies say the Frederick died 22 Aug 1891 in Port Huron, St Clair, Michigan, but that Frederick was born in New Jersey to Michael William Pace and Anna Eveland. His wife from 1850 to 1880, Penelope [__?__] was born in 1818 in Canada or New York. They were married in Ontario and their list of 15 children is completely different.

vi. Rachael Belyea b. 1805 in Kings, NB; m. 17 Sep 1832 in Saint John, NB to Alexander Beckett (b. 1805) Rachel and Alexander had two children.

vii. Nancy Ann Belyea b. 1808 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; m. 2 Jan 1832 in Queens, NB to Alexander Cochrane (b. 1796) Nancy Ann and Alexander  may have had around 8 children.

viii. Isaac P Belyea b. 1812 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; d. Mar 1888 Monticello, Maine; m. 6 Mar 1836 in Queens, New Brunswick to Elizabeth Jane Barnett (b. 1818 in Ireland – d. 5 May 1877 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick) She was Margaret’s sister. Her parents were George Barnett and Jane Burke. Isaac and Elizabeth Jane had 11 children between 1837 to 1856.

ix. John Yerxa Belyea b. 1817 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; d. 1 Feb 1874 Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick;

m1. 28 Sep 1835 in Queens, NB to Margaret Barnett (b. 1816 in Ireland – d. 1845 in New Brunswick) She was Elizabeth Jane’s sister. Her parents were George Barnett and Jane Burke. John and Margaret had 5 children.

m2. Rhoda Ann Gower (b. 1826 New Brunswick – d. Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada) John and Rhoda had eight children between 1847 and 1861.

x. Edward Belyea b. 1818 in Greenwich, Kings, New Brunswick, Canada; d. Greenwich Parish, Kings, New Brunswick; m. Clarissa [__?__] (b. 1827) Edward and Clarissa had two children.

7. Nathan Parks

Nathan’s wife Mary MacDonald was born 20 Sep 1781 in Glasgow, Scotland. Her parents were John MacDonald and Rebekah [__?__]. Mary was baptized by Rev. David Crandall at Upham Baptist Church about 1836. She was mother of 12 children, 8 sons and 4 daughters – all but one listed. She had 47 grand children and two great grandchildren when she died in 1856. Mary died 13 Oct 1856 St. Martins or West Quaco as it was called then by Rev. W. Jackson who preached the funeral sermon.

John was a school teacher of superior education being qualified to teach eight different languages, ancient and modern. He taught in the Old Madras School, or National School, at Fredericton, NB, which had been established there in 1820. These schools were supported by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, the National Society in England, the Church of England, and the New Brunswick government. In order to keep costs to a minimum, a system of monitors was used by which a large number of students could be taught by a few teachers. The instructors worked directly with the older children who then passed on the lessons they had learned to the younger ones. Although there was some concern over the control exerted by the Church of England in these schools, it was the most effective educational system in the province prior to the passage of the Common Schools Act of 1871. Madras schools were to remain in operation in New Brunswick until 1900.

Nathan and Mary lived in Burton, New Brunswick for 12 years then moved to Upham, New Brunswick

Lived 12 years in USA after their 1802 marriage.

1810 on census, 4th Parish, Newbury, Mass

1814 re-entered New Brunswick, Kings Co.

10 Dec 1818 – Petiton for land, Parish of Springfield, Kings Co.

2 Dec 1819 – follow up of same petition.

c 1836 – Bapt. Mary, Baptist Church, Upaham, Kings Co., by Rev. David Crandall.

31 Dec 1843 – Nathan died in St. Martins.

Children of Nathan and Mary:

i. John Parks b. 12 Dec 1803 in Newbury, Mass; d. 6 May 1873 in St. Martins, NB, Canada; m. 17 Oct 1826 in New Brunswick to Hannah Doherty (b. 24 Dec 1809 – d. Bef. 1861) John and Hannah had 10 children born between 1828 and 1849.

ii. Charles Parks b. 16 Sep 1806 in Newbury, Mass; d. 20 Jul 1807 in Newburyport, Mass.

iii. Charles Parks b. 8 Jul 1808 in Newbury, Mass.; d. 13 Sep 1816

iv. Mary Parks b. 5 Mar 1811 in Newbury, Mass.; m. 6 May 1831 in St. Martins, NB to George Jackson (1807 – )

v. Archibald Parks b. 8 Mar 1814 in Newbury, Mass.; d. 14 Jun 1889 in St. Martins, NB; m1. m. 5 May 1837 in St. Martins, NB, Canada to Lucy Davidson (1818 – 18 May 1862 – St. Martins, NB, probably of complications of child birth) Archibald and Lucy had 14 children between 1838 and 05 Apr 1862); m2. Sophia Berry (b. 1820 – d. 21 Apr 1884 in St. Martins, NB)

Ships and Vessels built by Archibald Parks & Sons at St. Martins, New Brunswick (1869 to 1883)

Rig Name of Vessel Month Year Tons
Schooner Vincent White 09/30/1869 140
Brig Laura B. 04/04/1870 278
Bark W.J. Whiting 06/19/1872 633
Bark Exile 11/20/1873 Fast 934
Bark General Wolseley 08/04/1874 760
Full Rig Ship A. MacKenzie 11/10/1875 1000
Ship F.M. Stokes 04/31/1876 1300
Ship Lord Lytton 08/21/1876 1350
Schooner Nettie Parks 01/27/1877 1390 91/100
Bark Leffey 08/21/1877 Cpt. McKellar 933
Bark Venezuela 06/16/1879 1100
Schooner Ethel B. 05/02/1882 944
Schooner J.F. Whittaker 04/26/1883 1050

(Copied from Record kept by Wallace Parks, a Son of Archabald (Archabald is the spelling in this) Parks Ship Builder of St. Martins, New Brunswick (also known as Quaco or West Quaco) by A.K.M. Parke .. Wife of Melvin Parke son of Wallace Parks (Parke)

vi. Lydia Parks b. 6 Sep 1816; m. 30 Mar 1837 to James Davidson (*1812 – )

vii. William H Parks b. 30 Sep 1818; d. 4 Sep 1891 in St. Martins, NB; m. 8 Jul 1846 in St. Martins, NB, Canada to Mary Jane Mosher (1825 – )

viii. Nathan Parks b. 17 Mar 1821 in St. Martins, NB; m. 3 Jul 1845 in St. Martins, NB to Elizabeth Fanjoy (1813 – 1893)

ix. Rebecca Parks 19 Mar 1824 in St. Martins, New Brunswick; d. 10 Feb 1901 in Everett, Mass.; m. 20 Jan 1843 in St. Martins, New Brunswick to Caleb Templeman (b. 18 Mar 1821 in St. Martins, New Brunswick – d. 08 Jun 1869 in Chatham Head, New Brunswick) Rebecca and Caleb had nine children born between 1844 and 1864. After Caleb died, Rebecca immigrated to the United States in 1871.

In the 1900 census, Rebecca was living in Townsend, Middlesex, Mass with her son-in-law Warren D. Hinds.

x. Jonathan Parks b. 10 Jan 1826; d. 19 May 1841

xi. George Parks b. 15 Mar 1828 in St. Martins, NB, Canada

8. Rachel Parks

Rachel’s husband Silas Titus was born 1765 in New York. His parents were Benjamin Titus and Ruth Bryan. Silas died in 1817 in New Brunswick, Canada.

When the Loyalists drew lots in 1784, Silas Titus received 100 acres of land at Lorneville, Saint John County, but he did not settle on his grant and it reverted to the government. Instead he followed his family to Queens County and in 1794 he married Rachel Parks at St. John’s Anglican Church, Gagetown.

Early in 1794, Silas Titus and Thomas Creighton were sued by Reuben Williams for an unpaid debt of £10, and appears to have lost the suit. Shortly thereafter Silas Titus sold Lot 25 on Greater Musquash Island, which belonged to his father, probably to pay his debt. After his father went to Canada, in 1802 Silas Titus filed a petition for Lot 8 on the southeast side of the Washademoak Lake, but because the government was not issuing grants during that period, the petition stalled. It is likely that Silas and Rachel Titus lived during the early years of their marriage in proximity to her family near Fredericton. Titus appeared in court records again in 1813, when he was sued by Alexander Nevers and Ezekial Sloot of Fredericton for a promise of £22.

Although only two children can be attributed to their marriage with certainty, there are several others suggested by circumstance. Abigail Titus who married in 1816 at Fredericton, Mary Titus who married there in 1822, Olivia Titus, who married in 1824 at Douglas, and Frances Titus who married in Douglas in 183… may be daughters. Allan and Benjamin Titus appear at different times in court documents between 1824 and 1836, mostly for small debts incurred at Fredericton and Douglas, and may be sons. On one occasion, in 1829, Benjamin Titus was named with George Titus for a combined debt of £44 to the merchant John Simpson of Fredericton, for “divers goods, wares, and merchandize.” There is no doubt that George Titus was a son of Silas and Rachel. George Titus was a lumberman and later lived at Edmundston.

Silas and Rachel Parks were still living in New Brunswick in 1817, residing in St. Mary’s parish, York County, when their daughter Andelina Titus was baptized at Gagetown. This is the only child for whom a baptismal record has yet been found.

29 Sep 1784 – Grant of land between Musquash and Saint John, Saint John Co.

4 Jul 1794 – Sale of lot #25, Upper Musquash Island, Saint John Co.

1802 – Memorial for land on Washademoak Lake, Queens Co.

Children of Rachel and Silas

i. Mary Titus b. 17 Sep 1796 in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada; d. Nov 1855 in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada; m. 2 Jun 1822 to Isaac Vivian Hutchinson Segee (b. 18 Mar 1801 in New Maryland, York, New Brunswick, Canada – d. 15 Apr 1837 in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada) Mary and Isaac had four children born between 1825 and 1833.

Some genealogies say Mary that married Issac was born in 1803, died in 1837 and was the daughter of Benjamin Titus (1771-1812) and Elizabeth Clark (1775-1798).

ii. Allan Titus b. 1797 in New Brunswick, Canada;

In 1824 Allen Titus was sued by Fredericton merchants William McKeen and Benjamin Blyther to recover £20 for diverse goods and merchandise. He was a defendant again in 1829 when another Fredericton merchant demanded payment of an £11 promissory note.

iii. Abigail Titus b. 1798 in New Brunswick, Canada d. 1822; m. 16 Nov 1816 in Fredericton, NB, Canada to Joseph Treat (*1793 – )

iv. Olivia “Olivea” Day Titus b. 1804 in New Brunswick, Canada; d. aft. 1851 census York, NB; m. 3 Oct 1824 in Douglas Parish, York County, NB. to William Blyther (b. 1806 Douglas Parish, York, NB – d. Aft 1871 census St Ann’s Ward, York, New Brunswick) Olive and William had eight children born in York, New Brunswick between 1826 and 1848.

Some genealogies say that William Blyther was born Feb 1804 Rockland, New York and died 25 Apr 1882 in Newark, New Jersey, but I only see 1851 and 1871 St Ann’s Ward, York, New Brunswick census records for William Blyther. I think this other man was the son of William Felter and Maryann Stephenson, and married 20 Sep 1829 – Westchester, New York to Asenath Delamater

v. Benjamin Titus b. 1808 in NB Canada; d. 1876; m. 27 Oct 1831 Wickham Parish, Queens, New Brunswick, Canada to his first cousin Elizabeth Foster

Benjamin Titus was a witness to the marriage of Olivia Day Titus in 1824. In March, 1829 he was twice sued. Jonathan Yerxa of Douglas parish asked to be paid £15 for diverse goods he had furnished, while John Simpson of Fredericton demanded £44 payment for the same from Benjamin and George Titus.

In 1831 Benjamin married his cousin Elizabeth Foster, daughter of Josiah Foster and Sarah Parks. After their marriage, Benjamin Titus Jr. purchased land on the Den Road in Cambridge parish. He and his sons were listed as farmers there in 1861.

Benjamin Titus died sometime between 1871, when he was still living with his family in Cambridge, and 1881 when Elizabeth was enumerated as a widow, supported by the labour of her sons Benjamin and Charles, still resident on the homestead. She died before 1891, when the family disappears from the Queens County census, probably before 1884, when her sons moved to Saint John.

vi. George Titus b. 1812 in New Brunswick, Canada m. 1 Feb 1859 in Eglise de St. Basile, Claire, Madawaska Co., NB to Bridget Gallagher (~1811 New Brunswick – d. 20 Dec 1863 Edmundston, Canada). Bridget first married William Clancy.

George Titus first appears in the archival record in 1829 when he and Benjamin Titus were sued for a combined sum of £44 by Fredericton merchant John Simpson, who claimed an outstanding debt for “diverse goods, wares and merchandize.” In 1833 George was again sued, this time in partnership with John Segee, for an unpaid promissory note made to James Balloch for £15. The court later reduced the debt to £13, acknowledging that Titus and Segee had begun payment by delivering “two scow loads of hay.”

George Titus reappears in 1859 in Victoria County, (which then also included all of what is now Madawaska County.) Having converted to Catholicism he married Bridget, widow of William Clancy. George and Bridget resided at Edmundston, where they were enumerated in the 1861 Census.

George Titus died 15 Dec 1863 and his wife Bridget died five days later, presumably from the effects of flu or pneumonia. There were no children implicated in the ensuing probate, and there was no mention of known relatives. George Titus’ real estate was valued at £100, and he owned sixty-four tons of birch timber valued at £355. His personal estate was appraised at £60 and included the following: one horse, one horse sled and cart, one cow, one hog, a hayrake, an auger, two scythes, some rope, a hand saw, three axes, a pair of wooling cards, a spinning wheel, a milk strainer, pails, a churn, a stove, a flat iron, a tea kettle, candlesticks, two tables, seven chairs, three chests, wearing apparel, two pair of men’s boots, two watches, a rifle with powder and shot, and sundry promissory notes. Three tons of hay were in the barn and a barrel of pork lay in storage. Against the estate was his outstanding account at Costello’s store, where over the previous year he had purchased homespuns, boots and a parka, as well as bolts of cotton, some flour, sugar and tea, several gallons of strong rum, and oats for his horse

vii. Frances Titus b. 1814 in New Brunswick, Canada; d. 18 Apr 1895; m. George Brewer (b. 1806 New Brunswick – ) His parents were John Brewer and Elizabeth Yerxa. Frances and John had seven children born between 1837 and 1849.

viii. Andelina Titus b. 28 May 1816 in St. Mary’s Parish, York Co., NB; m. 17 Jan 1828 in Waterborough, Queens Co., NB to Richard Stephens (~1795 – 1878) Andelina and Richard had eight children born between 1834 and 1852.

Sources:

http://www.barney.org/family/wga44.html#I7872

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=27664129

http://www.uelac.org/Loyalist-Info/detail.php?letter=p&line=68

http://automatedgenealogy.com/censusnb51/SurnameSearch.jsp?surname=Parks&geosort=

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=crystalinda22&id=I119017

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jloops&id=I26575

http://minervamorganbc.tripod.com/john_flewelling_of_halton_county__ontario.htm

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16 Responses to Nathaniel Parks

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  11. S Smith says:

    Enjoyed reading about my 4th great grandfather, Nathaniel Parks

  12. Pingback: Loyalists in New Brunswick | Miner Descent

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  14. Birgit says:

    Great post. I was checking constantly this blog and I’m impressed!
    Extremely useful info specifically the closing part
    🙂 I handle such info much. I used to be seeking this certain information for a long time.
    Thank you and good luck.

  15. markeminer says:

    Phyllis Cochrane
    aileen@nb.sympatico.ca
    Phyliss wrote …

    “Hello Mark. I found this site researching Nathaniel Parks. His daughter Mary married Henry Belyea ( descendant of Louis Boulier ) and their daughter Nancy Ann Belyea married Alexander Cochrane, my GG granfather. It states that they had 2 children, but in fact they may have had around 8 children, one of these being my great grandfather George Cochrane. Thanks for the information. I live in New Brunswick, Canada”

    I have made the updates

  16. Chris Bowden says:

    Hello again – saw the name Joseph(son of Nathaniel) – any idea if Joseph had a children? He would be the right age to be the Father of my Joseph who was living next to George Parks in Houlton in 1850. Perhaps this is the connection? He was 48 in 1850 and born in Unity ME.

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