Robert Williams

Robert WILLIAMS (1622 – 1680) was Alex’s 11th Grandfather; one of 4,096 in this generation of the Shaw line.

Robert Williams Coat of Arms

Robert Williams was born about 1622 perhaps in Wales.  He was an original purchaser of Hempstead, Nassau, NY.  Some sources say Robert had a brother, Thomas, who came with him to Hempstead, but I haven’t found definite evidence of a brother.  He married Sarah WASHBURNE about 1646.  He was listed as one of the early proprietors of Hempstead, Long Island, New York, in 1647.  In 1645-6 he purchased from the Indians a large tract of land centered at what is now Hicksville. Thus he was well established in the Hempstead area for at least eight years before he appeared on the Oyster Bay purchase deed.  Robert died in 1680 in Long Island City, Queens, New York.

I haven’t seen direct evidence that Robert Williams was a member of the Society of Friends, but there is a lot of indirect evidence that he was at least a sympathizer.  Thompson in the “History of Long Island” states that he was a close relative of the celebrated Roger Williams. His son-in-law, John Dole was a Quaker.  Robert’s homestead became the foundation of the Quaker settlement of Jericho, New York, he disposed of 1/3 of his property in Jericho to his wife’s sister, Mary (Washburne), widow of Richard Willets; in 1667 — thus paving the way for many pleasant Ancestral homes in that vicinity.   Mary appears on Friends records as active in 1682.  A Friends Meeting house was built in 1788 in Jericho that is still used today.

Hempstead, Nassau, New York

Sarah Washbourne was born on 26 March 1626 in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England.    Her parents were William WASHBURNE and Jane WHITEHEAD. Sarah died in 1693 in Hempstead, Long Island, New York.

Children of Robert and Sarah:

Name Born Married Departed
1. John Williams c. 1648 Hempstead, Nassau, NY Leah Townsend 1680Jericho, New York
2. Hope WILLEMZE c. 1650 in Hempstead, Nassau, NY Mary [__?__]1668
Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY
9 Aug 1704 Cape May, NJ
3 Sarah Williams c. 1652Hempstead, Nassau, NY John Champion1673 Hempstead 9 Nov 1720Newton, Gloucester, NJ
4. Patience Williams 1654Hempstead, Nassau, NY Samuel Barnes9 Nov 1676
New York
1716 Cohansey, NY
5. Mary Williams c. 1656Hempstead, Nassau, NY Thomas Jessup23 Nov 1683
Fairfield, Connecticut
.
John Dole
26 Jan 1688 in Long Island, Kings
1714Newton, Gloucester, NJ
6. Esther Williams c. 1658 Hempstead, Nassau, NY Thomas Cock
7. Phebe Williams 1660 in Of Hempstead, Nassau, NY John TownendFeb 1681
Oyster Bay Long Island, New York
9 Aug 1704
Townsends Inlet, Cape May, NJ

The original deed from the Indians to Robert Williams for the Plains in Oyster Bay, was executed on the 20 of May, 1648.

Oyster Bay, Nassau, New York

20 May 1648, only five years after the earliest purchase, Robert Williams bought nine square miles of land from Pugnipan, sachem (chief) of the Matinecock tribe originally known as the Williams Plantation. He paid Pugnipan in Trading Cloth There were no definite boundaries stated in the purchase. This tract included about nine square miles and is what we now call Jericho,  Hicksville,  Plainview, and  Syosset. In old Town of Oyster Bay records the area was originally referred to as “Lusum,” “Lussum,” or “Lewseem.” Some sources say this was a derivative of “Lewisham,” the area in England where the Williams family originated, although other sources indicate lusum is an Indian word meaning “the farms.”

The first families who settled in Jericho built their homes around the natural spring pond that provided an abundant supply of fresh water. This was also near an established Indian trail that began in New Netherland (now known as Manhattan) and ran all the way to the eastern end of Long Island. Originally frequented by Indians this trail, now known as Jericho Turnpike, has evolved into a major route for travelers and commerce.

Deed to Lesum

Be it known to all men at these pressants that I pugnipan Sacham of Toninnacik do for my selfre and in beehalfe of Nanamorous and Neponhew and pocipupon bargin and Sell and make over unto Robert Williames, of Himstead parte of the grete pleains lying northeast from Hemsted, or there abouts beegining At A Pointe of t res called by the Indians Ciscascate or Cantiag at A whit oake marked by me puginipan and from thence uppon a South line to the Middel of the plaine and from thence uppone A eat line to the end of the plaine, bounded with wodes one of the Este and Northeste and North or there aboutes all which tract of Lande I the sayed Pugnipan do for miselfe and in beehalfe of Nanamorrouas and Neponhew and Pocipupon bargin and sell and macke over unto the sayed Robert Williames his ares executores administrators and Asines for teme (them) pesaubly to ingay forever from us our ares and sucksessors for ever allso wee the boue sayed do acknolyeg in Trading Clothe for the fore menchaned tract of Plains lan in witness unto wee have set ouerbandes this twentieth day of May in the Yere of one Thousand Sixhundred forty eight

Pugnipan X his marke
Nanamorrouas X his marke
Neponhew X his marke
Pocipupon X his marke

witness
Richard Willets
John Washburn
rasaocume Sachem X his marke
Ponanegan X his marke
Maschacur X his marke
Perawes X his marke
Nannuttung X his marke

Entered in the office of records at New York the I2th day of ffebry I666
Mathias Nicolls, Sec’y

“A true coppy taken from the original (both in substance and ortography) and entered by order of the proprieters. Revised and compaired by me Samuel Willis Recorder.”

The following copy was struck off later and certified by Matthias Nicolls, secretary of Governor Andros:

“Bee it knone to all men at these presants that I Pugnipan sacham of Matinnacock do for my selfe and on the beehalfe of Nanamorrouas and Neponhew and pocipupon bargain and sell and make over unto Robert Williams of Hempstead parts of the grete pleains lying northeast from hemstead or there abouts beginning at A points of Tres called by the Indians as Cescascats or Cantiag at A which oake marked by mee pugnipan and from thence uppon a South line to the Middel of the plains and from thence uppon A: Est line to the End of the plaine bounded with the wodes one of the Este and Northest and North or there aboutse all which tract of Long Island. The sayed Pugnipan do for mislife and on the beehalfe of Nanomorrous and Neponhew and pocipupon bargal nsell and macke ouver, unto the Sayed Roberte Williams his ares Executors Arministrators and Asiner for teme pesaubly to ingay fowever from us our ares and Suckeseres for ever allso wel the bove sayed do ackknolyeg that wee have reserved fulle sattisfacktion of Roberte Williames in Trading Clothe for the fore menchoned Tract of plaine Land in witness hereunto we have Set over handes this twentieth day of May in the yere on Thousand Six Hundred Forty Eight.” Witness

Richard Willets
Pugnipan X his mark
John Washburne
Nanamarrous X his mark

Robert did not record his deed with the Dutch.

Oyster Bay was originally part of the colony of New Amsterdam and settled by some Dutch in 1632. In 1639, the Dutch West India Company made its first purchase of land on Long Island from the local Indians. The Dutch did not dispute English claims to what is now Suffolk County, but when settlers from New England arrived in (present-day) Oyster Bay in 1640, they were soon arrested as part of a boundary dispute.

In 1643, Englishmen purchased land in the present-day Town of Hempstead from the Indians that included land purchased by the Dutch in 1639. Nevertheless, in 1644, the Dutch Director granted a patent for Hempstead to the English. The Dutch also granted other English settlements in Flushing, Newtown, and Jamaica. In 1650, the Treaty of Hartford established a boundary between Dutch and English claims at “Oysterbay”, by which the Dutch meant present-day Cold Spring Harbor (to the east) and the English meant all of the water connected to present-day Oyster Bay Harbor. Meanwhile, the government of England came under the control of Cromwell as a republic, and smugglers took advantage of the unresolved border dispute.

In 1653, Robert Williams along with Rich Houlbrock and Daniel Whitehead he purchased six square miles in the Huntington area from Assiapum of the local Matinecock tribe. In this purchase he is mentioned as a resident of Oyster Bay. The three purchasers then assigned their purchases to the people of Huntington.

“Anno Dni one thousand Six hundred & fifety th[ree] This writing witnesseth yt Asiapum alias Mohenes have sold unto Peter Wright, Samuell Maio, William Leuerich, Their heyrs Executors administrators, & assignes all his Land Lyeing & Scituate upon Oyster Bay & is bounded by oyster River to ye east side, & Papaguatunk river on ye west side with all ye woods, rivers marshes uplands, ponds & all other the appurtenances lying betweene the bounds afore named, with All ye Islands Lying to ye Sea ward excepting one Island Comonly Called Hog Island & bounded neere Southward by a point of trees called Canteaiug. In Consideration of which bargaine & sale he is to receave as full satisfaction six Indian Coates, Sixe Ketles, Sixe fathom of wampum, sixe Hoes, sixe Hatchetts; three pair of stocking[s] thirty Auln-blades or Muxes [heads for eel spears], twenty Knives, three shirts, & as much peage [black wampum] as will amount to ffoure pounds sterling In witness whereof he hath set to his marke in ye prsence of

William Washborne, Anthony Wright, Robert Williams, Asiapum or Mohenes X his mark on the back is the following:

we within named Sam: Maio, Peter Wright & William Leuerich, doe accept of as joynt purchasers with ourselves ye persons under specified to the like right privileidgs as we ourselves in ye Lands purchased of Asiopum & particularly mentioned in ye writeing made & subscribed by himselfe & other Indians respectively interessed & in the names of such as were absent acted by him & them all: witnes our hands: joynt purchasers with us

Mr. Washbourne, William Leuerich, Tho: Armitage, Samuell: Mayo, Dan: Whitehead, Anth: Wright, Rob: Williams, Joh: Washbourne, Ric: Holbrooke

With this document, still preserved in the town clerk’s office at Oyster Bay, opens the history of the village. There were ten men present, four of whom, Peter Wright and his brother, Anthony, Samuel Mayo and the Reverend William Leverich came from Sandwich, Massachusetts. Of the others, Robert Williams, Daniel Whitehead, Thomas Armitage, and William and John Washbourne had already settled on Long Island at Hempstead. Richard Holbrooke came from Springfield, Massachusetts.

Also in 1653 Robert appears along with his father-in-law as witness to the deed from the Indians for the purchase of Oyster Bay by Peter Wright, Samuel Mayo and William Leverich. In the recording of that deed in 1667 by Mathew Nicolls, Secretary, Williams is mentioned as “a jont purchaser with us by William Leverich and Samuel Mayo.”

The monarchy was restored in England in 1660, and in 1644 King Charles gave Long Island (and much else) to his brother James, leading to the Dutch relinquishing control of all of New Amsterdam. In 1667 the settlement at Oyster Bay received its charter from the new English colony of New York, becoming the Township of Oyster Bay. By 1687, the last piece of land was sold by the Indians, and few remained by 1709.

23 Jan 1657 – Robert appears with others as a signer to a letter to Governor Stuyvesant, listing his address as of Oyster Bay.

13 Dec 1660 – He is again mentioned when Daniel Whitehead sells to Alexander Bryant a house and land previously purchased from Robert Williams of Oyster Bay. Had Robert moved to Oyster Bay? If so When? Miss Seaman mentions that Robert lived in Hempstead until 1659. Yet again, in 1662, in a sale of land by Robert to Robert Forman of Oyster Bay, he lists his residence as of Hempstead.

1667 – Robert made over a part of his plains purchase to his sister-in-law, Mary Willis, and states his residence as Oyster Bay. From this evidence it may be said that he probably left Hempstead for Oyster Bay in the early 1660’s. The move was due to the need for his personal presence on his land holdings in the centre-Island section.

1664 – The Indians brought complaints before Governor Nicolls that they had not sold the Matinecock lands to Hempstead.

And finally, in 1677, the Indians owners executed deeds conveying to Robert Williams, William Hudson and others each a specified tract of upland and an undivided one-seventh of adjacent salt meadows. As his share Williams received four acres of East Island. Again in 1664 he adjusted his original Indian patent tract line with the Town of Oyster Bay. By 1665 he was admitted as a freeholder in the Town of Oyster Bay. This, then, becomes the definite proof that at that date he resided in Oyster Bay.

Once Robert had become a substantial citizen of Oyster Bay, and after his successful settlement of his boundary line with the town, he worried about the ability to protect his early plains purchase to such a degree that, on February 13, 1666, he obtained a patent confirming his Indian purchase of 1648 from Governor Nicolls. This patent gave him the free liberty to sell to and plant so many families as need, but not to exceed the agreement reached with Oyster Bay. The Oyster Bay agreement limited him to six families of which Hope Washburne was one. Since he had had to journey to New York City to obtain his grant from the English who had taken New Amsterdam from the Dutch two years earlier, he probably increased his influence by contact with the new officialdom. In Governor Andros’ patent to the Town of Oyster Bay, he mentions the Williams’ purchase as an accepted patent. (1668)

By 1668, during the French and Indian Wars, Robert obtained for the families on his plains plantation the right for one man in each family to be exempt from military duty because of the distance from Oyster Bay. Again the need for personal attention to his land forced him to move his own family from Oyster Bay to his plains land. This can be gathered from a deed given to Frances Weekes on January 24, 1668, in which he states his residence as of “Lewseem”. Just where in Lusum he settled is undetermined, but in a deed given by his widow in 1682, she mentions her old house, located off the East Side of the highway and against Ye hill. This would seem to locate the house on the east side of the Hicksville-Jericho Road and a little north of the Spring Pond. Robert Seaman tells of an old house situated on such a spot, which was torn down about 1928.

As far as the records show, for the next eleven years Williams remained at his Lusum residence. His children were grown, so his interests probably were centered on getting them settled. His last recorded land sales were made on September 12, 1679: one to John Robbins of Mattinecock and one to John Fry.

Robert Williams probably died in 1681, while in Maryland. A copy of his will shows that it was drawn at St. Mary’s Kent County, Maryland. It mentions that Robert Williams was “of Long Island”, indicating that his residence was still listed as being here. The will was also admitted to probate in Maryland and bears the signature of Philip Calvert. Among the executors of his estate, John Bowne of Flushing, an outstanding advocate of religious toleration, is mentioned. What the circumstances of Robert’s death were is unknown. Whether he was buried in Maryland is also a mystery, though conditions of the times would indicated that he was buried close to the place at which he passed away. It is known that in January, 1683, Sarah Williams signed a deed as “widow of Robert Williams.”

In all of Williams’ deeds to others his boundaries are indefinite; such phrases as “20 acres of plains and 20 acres of woodland” abound. These indefinite land grants could only lead to much legal dispute over lines and eventually did. His wife and sons continued this same indefinite granting, so that by 1745 something had to be done to correct the vagueness.

Sarah, his wife, continued to enjoy health and lived in the old Williams’ homestead until her death in 1692. On June 11, 1687, she was commanded to appear at the next Court of Sessions to answer differences of (boundary) lines with the Town of Oyster Bay. In September, 1692, in a suit still pending, the Town of Oyster Bay named Nathaniel Coles, Edward White, and Job Wright to make an agreement with the Williams’. Sarah’s name appears in several other legal documents. On November 30, 1692, also, she and her son, Hope, signed a deed to Thomas Cook. Finally, on September 22, 1693, John Williams confirmed the aforementioned deed, stating that his mother is deceased. Thus, while no record of Sarah’s death can be found among the Lusum records, the deed above show that Sarah died in the later part of 1692 or early 1693.

Robert appears to have resided a part of the time in Hempstead, was living there in 1659. The Indian Deed for Oysterbay was executed in 1653 to Robert Williams and others, he was one of the patentees of Dosori’s, O. B. in 1668.

Some accounts say that Robert was born in Wales, and was a brother of Richard Williams, of Huntington, and a near relative of Roger Williams, of R. I., all of which may be true; I have not seen any of it verified, suffice it he was our Ancestor, and disposed of 1/3 of his property in Jericho to his wife’s sister, Mary (Washburne), widow of Richard Willets; in 1667 — thus paving the way for many pleasant Ancestral homes in that vicinity.

Mary Washburn Willetts appears on Friends records as active in 1682.

Jericho is located mainly in the Town of Oyster Bay with a small part in the Town(ship) of Hempstead.   Jericho was part of the Robert Williams Plantation in 1648. The English families who settled in Jericho were, or soon became, Quakers, members of the Society of Friends. Many fled from persecution in England and in the New England Colonies. They sought a peaceful existence as farmers. The name of the area was changed in 1692 from Lusum to Jericho after the town in the Middle East near the Jordan River mentioned in the Bible as part of the Promised Land

Thompson says that “Robert Williams was a near relative of Roger Williams, also a relative of Cromwell, a Welshman, and like his kinsman, a man of intelligence and great moral worth.”

Documentary Colonial History by Fernow gives in 1668 “An order for the absence of one man from each farm on Robert Williams Plantation….Whereas the familyes seated upon Robert Williams plantation are at so great distance from the Towne of Oysterbay to which they are related, that it may prove unsafe for all their men to be absent from home at times appointed for trayning which they are by Law required to attend” certify “that I thought fitt that one man in each farm on the plantation shall be free and exempted.” Sept. 10, 1668 at Fort James in New York.

Robert Williams’ will  2 Dec 1680 Written.  23 Apr 1682 Proven

Mentions grandson Robert Williams who would be a son of Hope or John.

Will of Robert Williams, of Oyster Bay “know yee that I Robert Williams of Long Island near Oyster Bay, now being sick.” Leves to his wife Sarah “all myh Plantation, with orchards, pastures and what wood land she may make use of, during her life, if she keepe herself a widow”

Leaves to son John Williams 100 acres of land, more than I have given him already.

To my grandson, Robert Williams, 40 acres in some convenient place.

“If my daughters marry and they want land, if their husbands will come and dwell upon mine, they shall goe to my overseers, and they shall give them land to live on, for them and their heirs.”

” If any of my sons or daughters doth walk disorderly, according to the truth; they shall have no part or parcel in this my will.”

Makes his wife Sarah, and Samuel Spicer and John Bowne overseers.

Leave to his son Hope Williams, 100 acres of land, which he hath already.

Sarah Washborne  outlived her husband and, as the “widdow Williams” did a great deal of real estate business. Robert Williams’ land is so loosely described that the later generations require a great deal of arbitration to settle their boundaries. The most capable and prominent citizens from as far as Flushing and Huntington were called on to ride the bounds and settle the differences. It was one of their outstanding qualities that they chose this method instead of law suits, and there were many such “arbitrations” in a little haircloth trunk in the garret of the Ketcham house at Jericho where some trusted “squire” must have lived in each generation and had the neighborhood papers for safekeeping.

Sarah Washborn Williams Will

1692 The Wills of the Washborne sisters and inventories are of interest, showing in the case of Sarah Williams the very primitive household furnishings “my great brass kettle” is of first importance. There is much pewter, flagons, and basins, brass ladles and bell-metal skellet, all precious because irreplaceable in the wilderness. It is interesting to note her treatment of her slave. She leaves to a daughter “my Neger man for the term of six years.” Then “sd Neger man shall have free liberty to choose his Master with whom it shall please him best for to Live with.” To a son Hope “all my horses wherever he can find them.”

Children

1. John Williams

John’s wife Leah Townsend was born about 1653 Hempstead, Nassau, New York.  Her parents were Richard Townsend and his first wife Deliverance Cole. Leah died in Long Island City, Queens, New York.

John and Leah Williams had two daughters, co-heirs of their father’s property.

His two sons, Hope and John, stayed on in Lusum until the early 1700’s and then moved to Cold Spring Harbor and Oyster Bay respectively. From their various land transfers it may be assumed that they got along well together. At one time, however, John refused to sell Hope his share in his mother’s orchard. John was chosen collector for Lusum on March 3, 1701, and again on March 7, 1709 for one year terms. This choice by his townspeople denotes his service to them. On June 20, 1703, John deeded land in Jericho to his daughter Temperance, wife of Daniel Seaman, and thus the Seaman family name came into the purchase area.

John had three children: Hannah, whose husband John Seaman is the ancestor of the present Seaman family in Jericho; Temperance, who married David Seaman; and Thomas, who in later life moved to Cold Spring Harbor and became it’s Highway Commissioner. One of the latter’s children, Martha, married Jacob Willis of Jericho.

2. Hope WILLEMZE (See his page)

3. Sarah Williams

Sarah’s husband John Champion was born 1647 in Hempstead, Nassau, New York. His parents were Thomas Champion and Frances Jacocks. John died in 1727 in Waterford, Gloucester, New Jersey.

4. Patience Williams

Patience’s husband Samuel Barnes was born 1647 in Southampton, New York. His parents were Joshua Barnes and Amy [__?__]. Samuel died 21 Feb 1693 in Southampton, New York.

5. Mary Williams

Mary’s first husband Thomas Jessup 1656 in Hempstead, Nassau, New York. His parents were John Jessup and Mary [__?__].   Thomas died 12 Sep 1684 in Oyster Bay, Lewis, New York,

Mary’s second husband John Dole was born in England.  The John Dole born 10 Aug 1648 in Newbury, Essex, Mass was a different person. His parents were Tobias Dole and Sarah [__?__].  Tobias Dole was born in 1630 in Rangeworthy, Gloucestershire, England and died in 1717 in Bristol, England. LDS baptism records that say he lived and died in Dublin, Ireland are incorrect.

Tobias was the brother of Richard Dole that removed to Newbury and the son of William Dole and Joane Hale of Rangeworthy, Gloucestershire, England.  Tobias was a Quaker and lived in Bristol England as a shoemaker. His son, John, a shoemaker, and daughter, Sarah both removed to America from Bristol, England in 1682 on different ships. Both were Quaker and landed in the Philly area. Both John and Sarah are listed by the Welcome Society.

Sarah came as an indentured servant and latter married Andrew Griscom, a master builder for the new city who emigrated from England in 1680.  . Andrew and Sarah are the great grandparents of Elizabeth Griscom Ross, (Betsy Ross).  Betsy She learned to sew from her great-aunt Sarah Elizabeth Ann Griscom.

I don’t know why John Dole removed to the Long Island area, but I suspect there were some kinship/Friends ties to the group around Oyster Bay. John and Mary Williams Jessup Dole thern removed to present Camden Co, Old Gloucester Co, NJ by 1694.

Many genealogies say his parents were Tobias Dole and Hannah Rolfe, but there was a Richard Dole (1622 – 1705) and Hannah Rolfe (1626 – 1678) whose son John Dole (10 Aug 1648 Newbury – 3 Oct 1699 in Newbury) married 23 Oct 1676 in Newbury to Mary Gerrish  (1658 – 1695).

One World Tree says our John Dole also married Christina Spaeth. John died 30 Nov 1714 in Newton, Gloucester, New Jersey.

John Dole’s will names  Wife Mary, Sons—John and Joseph, heirs and executors of real and personal estate.  Home farm, land on Deleware River, between  brother-in-law john Kaighin and Jonathan Deckinson.  Witnesses–John Kaighin and James Sommers, Jacob Badcock.  Proved 22 June 1715.

lib. 2, page 8 – Calendar of New Jersey Will Vol I 1670-1730 Part 1

08 Feb 1715 Inventory of the personal estate 117 pounds, –10, proclamation money: made by Thomas Sharp and John K.

6. Esther Williams

Esther’s husband Thomas Cock was born 15 Oct 1658 in Southold, Long Island, New York. His parents were James Cock and Sarah Clarke. Thomas died 1691 in Jericho, Long Island, New York.

Daughter Esther, who married Thomas Cook of Lusum, and her children, John and Charity, are mentioned in 1691 as receiving land in a deed from Sarah, Hope and John Williams. This family was prominent in Lusum for some time.  The name of the area was changed in 1692 from Lusum to Jericho, New York after the town in the Middle East near the Jordan River mentioned in the Bible as part of the Promised Land.

From Sarah’s Will –

To my youngest daughter Hester Cock, my Great Brass Kettle, but to lend it to her brothers and sisters on account of boiling cider, Also my house in the orchard during her widowhood, also  “my Neger man for the term of six years and then to be appraised and given to whatever master he chooses and who will pay for him,  Hester is to have the wheat on the ground and one-fifth of the stock and moveables.

7. Phebe Williams

Phebe’s husband John Townend was born 1658 in Nassau, Livingston, New York. His parents were Richard Townsend and his second wife Elisabeth Wicks.  After Phebe died, he married Mercy Langdon 1707 in Haddonfield M M Newton, New Jersey. John died 5 Jan 1721 in Townsends Inlet, Cape May, New Jersey.

Daughter Phebe Townsend and her husband, John, requested land as indicated in the transaction below, dated 30 Jan 1692:

“Whereas John Townsend ye Husband of my Daughter Phebe having often times requested of me Land in Right of his wife according to ye Last Will and Testament of my Husband Robert Williams deceased, and Consulted w(th) John Bowne one of my Husbands Overseers concerning ye Matter, wee do Mutally agree in Consideration of ye Necessity of ye Sd John Townsend, And in order to ye ffulfilling of ye Will of ye Sd Robert Williams, according to ye true Intent & Meaning, as also ye exp(r)sse words of ye Sd Will, We ye Sd Overseers of ye will aforesd, Have Given and Granted unto ye Sd John Townsend Husband of ye aforesd Phebe Townsend daughter of ye Sd Robert Williams Aforesd ffifty Acres of Wood Land and one Hundred Acres of Plaine Land for him ye Sd John Townsend & his Heires to possesse and enjoy forever, ffor ye Sd John Townsend to take up by ord(r) Und(r) our hands Deputing men to Lay out ye Same where ye Sd John Townsend Shall Judge Meet near & Convenient for him in any of ye Sd Robert Williams Land untaken up; But if either John or Hope Williams Sons of ye Sd Robert Williams Should obstruct the taking up of ye Sd Land & plaine in ye very place where ye Sd John Townsend Shall at ffirst Judge ffitt, Meet, Convenient, as Claiming right to take up ffirst, by virtue of a former grant or Gift by their ffathers Will; that then it Shall & may be Lawfull for ye Sd John Townsend in pursuance of this our Grant to take up the Sd Wood Land & plaine Land in any place whereever he Shall please throwout the whole Tract of ye Sd Robert Williams Wood & plaine Land whereever he Shall Se Cause it being Land not already taken up, To w(ch) wee Set our hands and Seales this thirtyeth Day of ye Eleventh Month, one Thousand Six hundred Ninety and two

Signed Sealed & dd in P(r)sence of us John Bowne, Mare (W) Willitts marke, James Townsend, Richard Willitts”

The mark of Sarah (S) Williams

Sources:

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=10596889&st=1

http://longislandgenealogy.com/ligwilliams.html

http://longislandgenealogy.com/Surname_Pages/williams.htm

http://www.theharmons.us/harmon_t/b1957.htm#P9142

http://www.theharmons.us/harmon_t/b1956.htm#P9060

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2915873&id=I577069130

http://www.westburyquakers.org/qt/archive/files/ACF113C.htm

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nynassa2/Bios/rwilliams.htm

http://www.jerichoschools.org/hs/library/community/history.htm

Advertisements
This entry was posted in 13th Generation, Immigrant - England, Line - Shaw, Pioneer and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Robert Williams

  1. Pingback: Hope Willemze | Miner Descent

  2. Pingback: William Washburne | Miner Descent

  3. Pingback: Unusual Names | Miner Descent

  4. Pingback: Robert Titus | Miner Descent

  5. John Dole says:

    The John Dole that married Mary Williams Jessup was the son of Tobias Dole and Sarah (?) of Bristol England. This is according to Tobias Will

    • markeminer says:

      Hi John,
      Thanks for the input, I’ve updated John Dole’s section. It looks like there may have been two John Doles in Newbury in the 1680’s.

      Genealogies are agreed that Tobias Dole was born in 1630 and died in 1717, but some say he lived and died in Dublin, Ireland and others say he was born in Rangeworthy, Gloucestershire, England and died in Bristol, England. Do you have more info on his origin? It looks like the other John Dole might have been the one born 10 Aug 1648 in Newbury, Essex,, Mass.

      • Jack Dole says:

        Marke, the LDS church has done us no favors in the babtism ritual requirement. I have run across many of my family that had made-up information in the data bases.. I am sure you know what I mean My Tobias was not from Dublin.

        We are convinced that he was the brother of Richard Dole that removed to Newbury and the son of William Dole and Joane Hale of Rangeworthy, Gloucestershire, England My Tobias was a Quaker and lived in Bristol England as a shoemaker. His son, John, a shoemaker, and daughter, Sarah both removed to America from Bristol, England in 1682 on different ships. Both were Quaker and landed in the Philly area. Both John and Sarah are listed by the Welcome Society.

        Sarah came as an indentured servant and latter married Andrew Griscom, a master builder for the new city. Andrew and Sarah are the great grandparents of Elizabeth Griscom Ross, Betsy Ross.

        I don’t know why John Dole removed to the Long Island area, but I suspect there were some kinship/Friends ties to the group around Oyster Bay. John and Mary Williams Jessup Dole thern removed to present Camden Co, Old Gloucester Co, NJ by 1694.

        The Richard Dole that married Hanna Rolfe, Newbury MA had a son John b. 1648 in Newbury. This John married Mary Gerrish and had son John, b.1686.

        As we know, the Friends saw the rest of the world, but the rest of the world choose not to see the Quakers.

        Jack Dole

    • markeminer says:

      Thanks John, I’ve updated my paragraph. According to wikipedia, Betsy learned to sew from her great-aunt Sarah Elizabeth Ann Griscom.

      I haven’t seen direct evidence that Robert Williams was a member of the Society of Friends, but there is indirect evidence that he was at least a sympathizer. Thompson in the “History of Long Island” states that he was a close relative of the celebrated Roger Williams. His son-in-law, John Dole was a Quaker. Robert’s homestead became the foundation of the Quaker settlement of Jericho, New York, he disposed of 1/3 of his property in Jericho to his wife’s sister, Mary (Washburne), widow of Richard Willets; in 1667 — thus paving the way for many pleasant Ancestral homes in that vicinity. Mary appears on Friends records as active in 1682. A Friends Meeting house was built in 1788 in Jericho that is still used today.

  6. Pingback: Northern Slave Owners | Miner Descent

  7. Carol Hofer says:

    I have a New York land deed dated 1704 from John Cock to John Mott. It mentions Queen Ann and says that he is from Metanacock (?) Queen County NY. Could this be your relative? I’m trying to get the history of the people on the deed and just wondered if you knew anything.

  8. Bruce Boyles says:

    Great research page!
    There is a newer version of Robert Williams’ will that was written on 23 Apr 1682 with a probate date of 05 Aug 1682, so he died between these dates. I found the will record on Ancestry.
    Description:
    Record of Wills, 1665-1916; Index to Wills, 1662-1923 (New York County); Author: New York. Surrogate’s Court (New York County); Probate Place: New York, New York
    familysearch.org Link:
    https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-899P-1SSV?i=274&wc=Q75Z-ZNL%3A213306101%2C226247901&cc=1920234
    Two pages in the link – first page has probate info and date – second page is the will.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s