Joseph Coleman

Joseph COLEMAN (1765 – 1858) was Alex’s  5th Great Grandfather, one of 64 in this generation of the Shaw line.

Joseph Coleman was born 8 Aug 1765  or 8 Aug 1769 in Newbury, Essex MA.  His parents were John COLEMAN and Lois DANFORTH. He married Mercy CROSS on 21 Aug 1790 in Vassalboro Maine.  After Mercy died, he married Dorcas Sherman on 39 Sep 1845 in Augusta, Maine. Joseph died at the home of his daughter Lois Danforth Sturgis in 1858 in Lewiston Maine aged 92 years.

Mercy (Mary) Cross was born around  1768 in Vassalboro, Maine.  Her parents were William CROSS and [__?__]. Mercy died 19 Dec 1843.

Doras Sherman was born in 1829 in Edgecomb, Lincoln, Maine.

Children of Joseph and Mercy:

Name Born Married Departed
1. John Coleman 1791 Vassalboro, Maine Sarah [__?__]
.
Betsy Matthews
1821
Aft. 1870
Windsor, Kennebec, Maine
2. Sarah Coleman 1793 Vassalboro Josiah Carr
1814

18 Jan 1876
Palermo, Waldo, Maine
3. Mehitable Coleman 1795 Vassalboro Jonathan Dow
1818
20 Jan 1874 Postville, Allamakee, Iowa
4. Maria Coleman 1797 Vassalboro Edward Eastman
28 Oct 1819 Vassalboro
1888
Hallowell, Maine
5. Lois Danforth Coleman 26 Apr 1800 Vassalboro Samuel Sturgis
6 Mar 1829
3 Sep 1883 Lewiston, Maine
6. Charles Milton Coleman 11 Jul 1803 Vassalboro Mary “Polly)” Crooker Bryant1825 Vassalboro, Maine 14 Jan 1898 Vassalboro, ME
7. Dudley COLEMAN 17 Nov 1805 Vassalboro ME Cynthia RICHARDSONc. 1833 in Vassalboro ME 25 Sep 1865 Vassalboro, Maine,
8. Jeremiah Coleman 1808Leeds, Androscoggin Maine Sarah Buswell31 Oct 1831
.
Mercy C. Doe
1835 Vassalboro
.
Sarah Smiley Downs
10 May 1846 Vassalboro
7 Jul 1882 Newport, Penobcost, Maine
9. Martin Coleman Feb 1812 Vassalboro Rebecca Doe
8 Aug 1838 Vassalboro
14 Mar 1900 Vassalboro
10. Eliza H. Coleman 1815
Vassalboro
William Henry Fossett
1835
31 Jan 1899 Cherryville, ME

The Battle of Bunker Hill cannon could be heard in Newbury. Joseph, 9 yrs old, was awakened the night before  by the sound of his father and other men “running bullets and making cartridges for use in the anticipated battle.”

When he was a boy, Joseph emigrated with his parents from Byfield, Massachusetts to Vassalboro, Maine behind a yoke of oxen. Today, you can make the 144 mile trip by car, cruising up I95 in two and a half hours. I wonder how long it took at oxen pace.

Joseph and his father John were among the earliest settlers of Vassalboro, Maine coming in the later part of the 1700’s. They settled in the vicinity of Webber Pond where Joseph reared a large family.

In 1814, the family moved to the west side of Webber pond. Joseph bought and tore down a house on the east side of the pond, moved it across the pond on a raft and reconstructed it on the west side. The new homestead was so near the woods that trees could have been felled on the roof from either side. At this time, there were no roads leading to and from the house, except for logging roads.

Joseph was a whig.

Joseph had 72 grandchildren and died at the home of his daughter Mrs. Lois Danforth Sturges in Lewiston, Maine in 1858, aged 92 years.

In the 1820 census and the 1840 census, Joseph was living in Vassalboro, Maine.

Children

Joseph and Mercy had 72 grandchildren.

1. John Coleman

John’s first wife Sarah [__?__] died before 1821 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

John’s second wife Betsy Matthews was born Sep 1790 in Maine. Betsey died 31 Jan 1864 in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine.

In the 1850 census, John Colman was farming in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine.

Children of John and Betsey:

i. Mary Ann Coleman b. 12 Oct 1823 in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine; d. 20 Dec 1916 in Maine; m1. 24 Dec 1846 Maine to Daniel C Gardner (1825 Maine – 22 Aug 1868 Cross Hill Cemetery, Vassalboro, Kennebec County, Maine); m2. 20 Oct 1881 to Charles Brown

In the 1850 census, Daniel and Mary Ann living in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine where Daniel was a trader. In the 1860 census, Daniel was a grocer in Jersey City.

ii. Lovina H. Colman b. 30 May 1825 in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine; d. 20 Dec 1898 in Malden, Middlesex, Mass; m. Dana Clark Hanson (26 Feb 1812 – 13 Jan 1895) Dana’s parents were James Hanson and Deborah Clark. Lovina and Dana had five children between 1846 and 1859.

In the 1870 census, Dana was a clerk for the Horse Railroad in Boston, Mass

iii. John Eldridge Coleman b. Aug 1829 in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine; d. 16 Aug 1902 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine of heart disease; m. 19 Dec 1852 Vassalboro to his first cousin Nancy H. Eastman (b. 9 Sep 1825 in Vassalboro – d. 9 Dec 1885) Her parents were Maria (Mariah) Coleman and Edward Eastman (see below).

In the Civil War, John served in Company B 1st Regiment, Maine Heavy Artillery For the story of the regiment, see my post Maine Volunteers.

In the 1870 census, John and Nancy were farming in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine with John’s 79 year old father living with the family.

iv. Lucy Coleman b. 1830 in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine; d. After 1850 census A Lucy Coleman (b. 28 Oct 1830 in Maine) married 1 Jan 1856 to George Washington Sargent (b. 27 Apr 1833 in Norwich, Windsor, Vermont – d. 13 Nov 1914 in Malden, Middlesex, Mass)

George enlisted in Company H, Massachusetts 12th Infantry Regiment on 20 Aug 1862. Mustered out on 08 Jul 1864 at Boston, MA.

v. Joseph H Coleman b. 9 Oct 1832 in Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland, Maine; d. Aft 1920 census in Keene, Cheshire, New Hampshire; m. 24 Nov 1858 to Martha J. Foster (b. Mar 1837 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine – d. 1 Mar 1913 in Keene, Cheshire, New Hampshire) Martha’s parents were Willis Foster and Mary [__?__] (b.1815)

In the 1880 census, Joseph and Martha were living in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine where Joseph was a grocer.

2. Sarah Coleman

Sarah’s husband Josiah Carr was born 8 Oct 1790 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine. His parents were Benjamin Carr and Abigail Prescott. Josiah died 28 Jul 1858 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine.

In the 1850 census, Josiah was farming in Palermo, Waldo, Maine.

Sarah Coleman Carr Headstone — Smith Cemetery
Palermo, Waldo County, Maine

Children of Sarah and Josiah:

i. William C Carr b. 1815 in Palmero, Waldo, Maine; d. 18 Nov 1854 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; m1. Sarah [__?__] (b. 1820 – d. 22 May 1846, Inscription on stone reads, Also an infant son, in Palermo, Waldo, Maine); m2. 31 Dec 1849 Albion, Maine to Ruth H Marden (b. 1822 – )

ii. Thomas J. Carr b. 1820 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; d. 5 Aug 1898 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine; m. 1844 to Sarah Jane Bailey (b. Oct 1823 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine – d. 1 Jun 1908 in Freedom, Waldo, Maine) Sarah’s parents were Joseph Bailey and Mary Robinson. Thomaws and Sarah had eight children born between 1845 and 1870.

In the 1870 census, Thomas and Sarah J were farming in Freedom, Waldo, Maine.

iii. George E Carr b. 1824 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; d. 8 Aug 1825 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine. Buried Smith Cemetery.

iv. Elder Jeremiah Carr b. Aug 1826 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; d. 9 Jan 1885 in Albion, Kennebec, Maine, buried Smith Cemetery, Palermo, Waldo, Maine; m. 28 Sep 1848 Albion, Maine to Isabell B Wing (b. 24 Mar 1833 in Albion, Kennebec, Maine – d. 19 May 1907 in China, Kennebec, Maine) Isabell’s parents were William Wing (1813 – 1891) and Rosetta Clark (1813 – 1898) After Jeremiah died, Isabell married 10 Jun 1887 Age: 54 Kennebec, Maine to George A Jackson (b. 28 Dec 1825 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine – d. 10 Apr 1916 in China, Kennebec, Maine)

In the 1860 census, Jeremiah was a shoemaker in Albion, Kennebec, Maine. In the 1880 census, he is listed as a clergyman.

v. Hannah P Carr (twin) b. 1838 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; d. Aft 1850 census

vi. Juliana H A Carr (twin) b. 1838 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; d. Aft 1850 census

vii. Sarah Carr b. Palmero, Waldo, Maine

3. Mehitable Coleman

Mehitable’s husband Jonathan Kennedy Dow was born about 1797 in Harlem, Kennebec, Maine. His parents were Peter Richard Dow and Mary “Polly” Kennedy. His “Book of Dow” designation is “John Dow adgcagc” Jonathan died Mar 1872 in Calais, Washington, Maine.

In the 1850 census, John was farming in China, Kennebec, Maine.

Jonathan and Mehitable did not leave Kennebec, Maine for Iowa until after the 1860 census when they were already in their 60’s.

Mehitable Coleman Dow Headstone — Postville, Allamakee, Iowa

Children of Mehitable and Jonathan :

i. Abrah V Dow b. 1822 Maine; m. 8 Sep 1842 Pittston, Kennebec, Maine to Leonard Mooers (b. 2 Sep 1818 in Maine – d. 2 Feb 1890 in Minnesota)

Leonard enlisted in Company D, Minnesota 10th Infantry Regiment on 21 Aug 1862. Company D, Captain W.W. Phelps; Company D, under Captain Phelps was stationed at Henderson MN;

Company D Casualties at the Battle of Nashville Private G.L. Lunsden, killed; Private Frank Griffen, killed; Private James Ryan, killed; Sergt. D. Wightman, wounded in leg; Corporal Isaac G. Hasbrook, wounded in face, slight; Private George Reeves, wounded in chest, severe; Private Ole Nelson, wounded in body; Private W.S. Barns, wounded in head, arm and hand.

The Battle of Nashville was a two-day battle that represented the end of large-scale fighting in the Western Theater of the Civil War. It was fought at Nashville, Tennessee, on December 15–16, 1864, between the Confederate Army of Tennessee under Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood and Federal forces under Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas. In one of the largest victories achieved by the Union Army during the war, Thomas attacked and routed Hood’s army, largely destroying it as an effective fighting force.

Battle of Nashville Charge

After the Battle, Union troops trailed the Confederates for almost 10 days. By the time the Southerners had re-crossed the Tennessee River, the Army of Tennessee had disintegrated, as men were dying from cold or famine or taking off for shelter in different directions. This disarray ensured that the weakened Southern forces could not invade the North. A few weeks later, Hood resigned his command.

The 10th Minnesota was in  Col William L. McMillen‘s 1st Brigade,    BG John McArthur‘s  First Division,  MG Andrew J. Smith‘s  Detachment, Army of the Tennessee

Sunset  on December 16 was rapidly approaching, and if no attack was made before then  Confederate Army of Tennessee . Gen. John Bell Hood would be in a position to either strengthen his position overnight or safely retreat south.

Leonard’s Division Commander John McArthur,  was aware of this. He also saw that the Confederate lines were being badly battered by Federal artillery which was firing on them from nearly every direction.  At about 3:30 pm he sent a message to Smith and Maj. Gen.George H. Thomas.that unless he heard to contrary in the next five minutes his division was going to attack Shy’s Hill and the Confederate line immediately to its east.

Leonard Charged the Enemy at Shy’s Hill. Here’s how it looked in the 1880’s

The three brigade attack began on McArthur’s timetable. Leonard’s brigade went up and over Shy’s Hill; because of the misplacement of the Confederate trenches only the regiment on the east (Leonard’s 10th Minneota) sustained significant casualties from Confederates, who were firing from the plain to its left.

“Two field officers, six line officers, wounded, and some sixty enlisted men, attest the fiery ordeal through which this regiment passed; and the fact that it reached the rebel works in its front as quickly as the regiments on its right, which were less exposed, is ample evidence of the courage and daring of both officers and men. Lieut. Col. Jennison, the commanding officer, was conspicuous for his high daring, and set a noble example to his officers and men. He fell, severely wounded, on the enemy’s works.”

Shy’s Hill Trail Head

Leonard’s 10th Minnesota maneuvered until about 2 o’clock P.M., when it took position in front of the left centre of the enemy’s line, and remained in this position a few minutes, when it participated in a successful charge against the enemy, who was strongly intrenched on a commanding eminence, which resulted to him in the loss of four cannon and many prisoners.

“After pausing a few minutes for rest, the regiment, in connection with other regiments of the brigade, moved about a half mile to the right and again charged the enemy, who was surrounded by heavy earthworks upon a high hill, and after a severe struggle had the honor of first planting its colors upon the works and capturing two cannon and over one hundred prisoners.  (see Narrative of the Tenth Regiment, Minnesota Infantry July 14, 2012 By Gen. J.H. Baker)

McArthur’s second brigade hit these Confederates while they were so distracted.  The third brigade, attacking to the east of Granny White Pike caught a large body of Confederate skirmishers outside of their lines and went into the Confederate lines with them.

Slope of Shy’s Hill

The Confederate left flank suddenly disintegrated. The Confederate line was rolled up west to east with the Confederates retreating to the south via Granny White Pike and Franklin Pike. A part of Lee’s Corps maintained good order and covered the retreat on Franklin Pike.  Rucker’s Confederate cavalry brigade performed the same service in a nighttime melee in the rain on Granny White Pike.

Mustered out on 21 Mar 1865 at Keokuk, IA.

In the 1860 census, Leonard Abrah and their daughter Nancy were living with Abrah’s brother Joseph’s family in Township 112 Range 13, Goodhue, Minnesota. In 1870, Leonard and Abrah were farming in Wythe, Hancock, Illinois.

ii. Joseph C. Dow b. 12 Aug 1823 in China, Kennebec, Maine; d. 28 May 1899 in Swift, Minnesota; m. Eliza A Durgin (1829 – 1910)

In the 1870 census, Joseph was a wagonmaker in Post, Allamakee, Iowa. His wife and parents were living with him.

Joseph C. Dow Obit

iii. Elijah S Dow b. Oct 1825 in China, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1 Dec 1911 in Newport, Washington, Minnesota; m1. Calista [__?__] (b. ~1837 in Michigan – d. 1875 in Minnesota); m2. Jane [__?__] (1836 – )

In the 1880 census, Elijah was working as a cooper in Red Wing home of Red Wing Shoes, Goodhue, Minnesota. In 1870 he and his family were livinng next to his brother Dudley and his family in Zumbrota, Goodhue, Minnesota,.

iv. Dudley Coleman Dow b. 28 May 1831 in China, Kennebec, Maine; d. 7 Apr 1907 in Appleton, Swift, Minnesota; m. 19 Aug 1855 Kennebec, Maine to Elizabeth R Parmenter (b. Feb 1839 in China, Kennebec, Maine – d. 24 Nov 1927 in Appleton, Swift, Minnesota) Dudley’s sister Harriet married Elizabeth’s brother Riley. Their parents were Danford Parmeter (1805 – 1879) and Sally Creasy (1805 – 1872). Their grandparents were Joseph Parmenter and Roxanna “Roxey” Richardson. Their great grandparents were our ancestors Seth RICHARDSON II and Sarah FRENCH.  Dudley and Elizabeth had eight children born between 1856 and 1880.

Dudley Coleman Dow Obit

Elizabeth Parmenter Dow obit

Between 1860 and 1863, Dudley remmoved to Zumbrota, Goodhue, Minnesota. In the 1870 census, he was living next to his brother Elijah. Zumbrota was claimed as a town in 1856 by Joseph Bailey and D.B. Goddard. It is along the North Fork of the Zumbro River and promotes itself as “the only Zumbrota in the world.”

The Zumbrota Covered Bridge is Minnesota’s last remaining covered bridge. It completed in November 1869 as a replacement for Zumbrota’s original bridge which was destroyed by the spring flood of that year. The covered portion of the bridge was added in 1871.

I don’t normally include 2nd Cousins, but this photo of Dudley’s daughter Edna Angeline Dow (b. 20 Jan 1877 in Appleton, Swift, Minnesota – d. 3 Aug 1976 in Chippewa, Minnesota) and Harold Blum was intriguing.

v. Harriet Lizzie Dow b. 30 Apr 1837 in China, Kennebec, Maine; d. 21 Sep 1891 in Palermo, Waldo, Maine; m. 25 Mar 1855 China, Kennebec, Maine to Riley Wellington Parmenter (22 Jul 1832 Monticello, Aroostook County, Maine – 5 Jun 1906, Palermo, Waldo County, Maine) Harriet’s brother Dudley married Riley’s sister Elizabeth. Their parents were Danford Parmeter (1805 – 1879) and Sally Creasy (1805 – 1872).   Their grandparents were Joseph Parmenter and Roxanna “Roxey” Richardson. Their great grandparents were our ancestors Seth RICHARDSON II and Sarah FRENCH.  Harriet and Riley had fifteen children born between 1857 and 1883!

In 1835 Riley returned with his parents to Parmenter Hill where the family lived on three different Parmenter farms. At the age of 16 he “bought” his time to age 21 for $300 and started farming for himself. He later moved to new land in Palermo where he cleared a fine farm. Here he prepared a cemetery with stones “well laid up” and moved the bodies of his deceased children from the farm in China to the new cemetery, still in good condition.

In the 1870 census, Riley and Harriet were farming in Palermo, Waldo, Maine

vi. Jonathan Dow ?.

vii. Mercy Maria Dow ?

4. Maria (Mariah) Coleman

Maria’s husband Edward Eastman was born 1 Jun 1793 in Kennebec, Maine. His parents were Thomas Sleeper Eastman and Sarah Cummings. Edward died 25 Aug 1869 in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine of lung congestion.

In the 1850 census, Edward was farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine next to his brother-in-law Jeremiah Coleman.

Children of Maria and Edward:

i. Octavia Caroline Eastman b. 19 Sep 1820 in Palmero, Lincoln, Maine; d. 29 Apr 1907 in Fairfield, Somerset, Maine; m. 17 Oct 1844 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to James E. Wyman (b. 1817 in Canaan, Maine – d. 11 Jan 1887 in Fairfield, Somerset, Maine)

In the 1860 census Octavia and James were living in Fairfield, Somerset, Maine (Kendalls Mills post office) where James was a millman (working in a saw mill).

ii. Nancy H. Eastman b. 9 Sep 1825 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 9 Dec 1885; m. 19 Dec 1852 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to her first cousin John Eldridge Coleman (b. Aug 1829 in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine – d. 16 Aug 1902 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine) (See above)

John served in Company B 1st Regiment, Maine Heavy Artillery

In the 1870 census, John and Nancy were farming in Windsor, Kennebec, Maine with John’s 79 year old father John Sr. living with the family.

iii. Violet Eastman b. 7 Dec 1827 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 15 Apr 1904 in 1722 Colby Street, Everett, Snohomish, Washington; m. 5 Jan 1846 Age: 18 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to Jesse T. Stevens (1822 – 1880) After her husband died, Violet moved west to Minneapolis (1880) and Seattle (1900) and lived with her son Clinton.

Violet Eastman (1827 – 1904)

In the 1870 census, Violet and Jesse lived in Lewiston Ward 7, Androscoggin, Maine where Jesse worked as a carpenter.

iv. Cordelia Eastman b. 23 Jan 1829 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 14 Nov 1875; buried Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota; m. 12 Dec 1853 Age: 24 Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine to William T. Dingley (b. 30 Jan 1830 in Maine – d. 22 Sep 1899 in Minnesota) Cordelia and William had four children born between 1857 and 1872. After Cordelia died, William married Catherine L. [__?__] (b. 1841 in New Jersey – d. 11 Dec 1922 in Hennepin, Minnesota) and had another child.

In the 1870 census, Corelia and William were living in Harpswell, Cumberland, Maine where William worked as a carpenter.

v. George Eastman b. 11 Mar 1832 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. Aft 1870 census; m. Mary E. Huff (b. 1831 in Wilton, Franklin, Maine – d. Wilton, Franklin, Maine) Mary’s parents were Preston Huff (1805 – ) and Cynthia [__?__]

In the 1860 census, George and Mary were living with Mary’s parents in Wilton, Maine and they were still with her parents 10 years later.

vi. Eliza R. Eastman b. 12 Jul 1835 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 13 Jul 1854 to Willard Henry Wilson (1815 Maine – 11 Jan 1899 Fairfield, Somerset, Maine) Willard’s parents were Isaac Wilson and Mehitable [__?__].

In the 1870 census, Willard and Eliza were living in Hallowell, Kennebec, Maine.

vii. Harriet Eastman b. 10 Jul 1839 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 23 Dec 1899 in 37 Winter St Portland, Cumberland, Maine; m. 21 Jun 1857 Androscoggin, Maine to Jacob M. Mace (b. Jun 1833 in Maine – d. 11 Dec 1900 in Lynn, Essex, Mass) Jacob’s parents were Reuben Mace and Lucinda Merrifield. Harriet and Jacob had four children born between 1859 and 1869.

In the 1870 census, Harriet and Jacob were living in Lewiston Ward 7, Androscoggin, Maine where Jacob was a pattern maker.

viii. Thomas Augustus Eastman b. 15 Mar 1842 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 2 Apr 1919 in Mass; m1. 3 Oct 1863 Age: 21 Hallowell, Maine to Melissa Dexter Cross (Jun 1844 Maine – 4 Feb 1903 Maine); m2. 13 Nov 1907 Age: 65 Providence, Rhode Island to Annie Powers Cross (1840 – 1923) Annie’s parents were William Cross and Abbie Lewis.

Thomas enlisted in Company C, Maine 10th Infantry Regiment on 05 Oct 1861. Mustered out on 07 May 1863.

In the 1900 census, Thomas and Melissa were farming in Bowdoinham, Sagadahoc, Maine

5. Lois Danforth Coleman

Lois’ husband Samuel Sturgis was born 2 Jun 1807 in Vassalboro, Kennebec. His parents were James Sturgis (b. 1776 – d. 5 Nov 1840 in Vassalboro) and Hannah Faught (b. 13 Apr 1780 – d. 16 May 1811). His grandparents were our ancestors Edward STURGIS and Mary BASSETT.  Samuel died 12 Apr 1843 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

After Samuel died, Lois raised a large family as a single mother. In the 1850 census, seven years after Samuel had died, she had six children ages 8 to 19 at home.

In the 1850 census, Lois was a widow with six children in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine. All six of her children were still at home ten years later in 1860.

Children of Lois and Samuel:

i. Mercy Ann Sturges b. 6 Sep 1830 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1 Jan 1904 in Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine; m. 18 Jul 1888 Age: 57 Madelia, Watonwan, Minnesota to Manoah Delling (1819 Madelia, Minnesota – 5 Nov 1892) He first married Hester Eliza Vought (b. ~1818 in New York – d. 1886 in Madelia, Watonwan, Minnesota)

Manoah Delling and his first wife Hester ca 1870

In the 1880 census, Mercy was living with her mother Lois in Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine. Mercy was 58 years old when she first got married.

ii. Hannah Jennie Sturges b. 2 Nov 1832 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 22 Dec 1909 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine; m. 22 Dec 1869 Age: 37 Androscoggin, Maine to Harrison Pullen Gilbert (b. 10 Jun 1816 in Kingfield, Somerset, Maine – d. 21 Jun 1898 in Madelia, Watonwan, Minnesota) Harrison’s parents were Spencer Gilbert (1789 – 1860) and Nancy Dudley (1790 – 1859).

In the 1880 census, Hannah J and Harrison were farming in Madelia, Watonwan, Minnesota.

iii. Almon Packard Sturges b. 4 Mar 1835 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 19 Jan 1920 in New Bedford, Bristol, Mass; m. 7 May 1874 Falmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts Age: 39 to Rebecca Gifford Hamlin (b. 30 Aug 1843 Maine – d. 15 Aug 1924 New Bedford) Rebecca’s parents were Simeon Hamlin and Eliza Gifford

In the 1880 census, Almon was an engineer in Falmouth, Barnstable, Mass

iv. Albert Henry Sturgis b. 2 May 1837 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. Auburn, Androscoggin, Maine; m. 22 May 1859 to Ruth Ellen Thomas (b. 31 Oct 1840 in Strong, Maine – d. 4 Aug 1898, Auburn, Androscoggin, Maine)

In the 1880 census, Albert was working in a cotton mill in Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine.

v. Perley Franklin Sturges b. 31 Oct 1839 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 12 Jan 1915 in Melrose, Middlesex, Mass; m. 30 Apr 1872 Age: 32 to Emma Maria Healey (b. Nov 1845 in Maine – d. Melrose, Middlesex, Mass) Perly and Emma had four children born between 1873 and 1883.

In the 1880 census, Perley was a Produce Dealer in Melrose, Middlesex, Mass.

vi. Alonzo Walton Sturgis b. 16 Jun 1842 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 12 Aug 1907 in Old Orchard, Cumberland, Maine; m. 4 Apr 1867 Age: 24 to Frances Ann Murray (11 Aug 1841 in Greene, Maine – d. Aft. 1930 census, Queens, NY)

Frances Ann Murray Sturgis Portrait — Frances Ann was a Dressmaker in the 1860 census

In the 1880 census, Alonzo was a printer in Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine.

6. Charles Milton Coleman

Charles’ wife Mary (Polly) Crooker Bryant was born Feb 1805 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Mass. Her parents were Nathaniel Bryant (1777 – 1850) and Mary Crooker (1778 – 1874). Polly died 4 Oct 1889 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

Charles M Coleman Bio

Milton started working at a saw mill at the foot Webber Pond when he was just fourteen years old. Later, he owned the mill and did an extensive lumbering business.

In the 1850 census, Charles was farming in Vassalboro, Maine,

Charles Milton Coleman Obt

My Life’s Review of Ninety Years

By Charles M. Colman 1893

On times swift wing – Oe’r sun tethered earth

Through space has sped—reveling,

Circling, with ever changing scene,

Of life, and light—these ninety years,

Since first my name was called

To battle with the world.

Ninety summers heat have clothed the earth in green

And ninety winters frost

Has changed the green to white

And here I am today holding my life’s review.

How thinned the veteran ranks

How brave and bright the new recruits

How changed is all about

How changed in home and life

In thought and feeling, how changed am I,

Though still the same in name and life.

Hail and welcome dear ones all,

Who send or bring life’s greeting,

Alas, that all could not be here

And join as once in choral song

And make the old home ring.

But so it many not be,

Yet that happy day will come,

In Gods good time, when all the

Dear ones, now sadly missed

Our eager waiting hands will grasp

Today is one of Gods good times

As all is good with him,

So in his light will see light,

And thank him for this day.

The longest human life is short,

And passes like the dream,

The hopes we plant reach the sky

Where we must gather bye and bye, the fruits,

So let be—for to our

Father thus it seemth best.

How changed my life

Since my boyhoods home,

When those I called Father, Mother,

Brother, sister, as we do now

We read our years with joy

On times brief calendar,

As took as natal gifts

Strokes counted for years upon our backs

Quickly then, as now, time flew,

Our youthful home was changed

For new ones of our own.

Charles M Coleman House

At loves behest the bridal knot was tied,

And now twigs grew on the family tree,

And we called our father “grandpa”

As you now do today to me.

In those new homes, fresh planted on these shores

Art was unknown, so I may not show

The likenesses of those dear ones

In life’s last grand review was continued

Yet each dear face and form in memory album

Is fresh and plump and fair.

I cannot name them all

Here once, they mere, in strength

Fighting life’s battle as we do now

How brief the time since John, Sally,

Hetty, and Lois, Jeremiah, Dudley,

And Martin, Maria, Eliza and I

From Fathers table went

To sit at new ones of our own.

What rapid changes followed,

Forests fell, new homes arose,

Schools and churches filled

While sturdy teams uptore the stumps

And drew the furrowing plow.

Strong hands built house and barn,

And mowed the grass and grain,

Fed and clothed the little ones,

And paid the honest debt.

.

Charles Milton Coleman Headstone — Vassalboro, Maine

Some of Charles’ children lost their “e” and spelled their name Colman.

Children of Charles and Polly:

i. Daniel Bryant Coleman b. Jan 1826 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1905 in Kimshew, Butte, California (Near Chico); m. 1858 Butte County, Calif to Mary Elizabeth Moore (b. 22 Sep 1839 in Springfield, Sangamon, Illinois – d. 14 Jul 1910 in Kimshew, Butte, California) Daniel and Mary had seven children born between 1858 and 1881.

Daniel and his brother Henry came to the California Gold fields in 1852. Henry returned to Maine, but Daniel stayed.

In 1976, Lois Colman, granddaughter of D.B. Colman, canyon pioneer, realized her dream of preserving the history of Butte Creek Canyon came true, with the opening of the Colman Memorial Community Museum. The museum was financed with the profits of her book “Tailings of Butte Creek Canyon“. (Not cheap collectible editions $172 – $200 at Amazon.)

Interesting things to see at the Museum at 13548 Centerville Road, Chico, CA:

  • Civil War Memorabilia
  • Gold Mining Equipment
  • Indian Basket Collection
  • Antique Tools
  • Old School Material
  • 1800’s Clothing
  • Chinese Artifacts
  • Antique Cooking Utensils
  • New Maidu Exhibit
  • Bridges of Butte Creek Canyon Exhibit
  • Museum Collection Index

Charles’ oldest sons Daniel and Henry came to California in the Gold Rush

The Honey Run Covered Bridge crosses Butte Creek and intersects with Centerville Road in Butte County, California leading to Butte Canyon where Daniel’s family lived. It is located about halfway in between Chico and Paradise in northern California. It is one of the few covered bridges left in California and is the only tri-span bridge in the United States.

ii. Henry Coleman b. 1828 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1 May 1861 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine

Henry and his brother Danie came to the California Gold fields in 1852. Henry returned to Maine, but Daniel stayed.

iii. Elizabeth Hannah Coleman b. 13 Mar 1830 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 26 Oct 1904 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 10 Apr 1855 Age: 25 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to Luther Morrison (29 Apr 1828 Albion, Kennebec, Maine – 11 Jun 1905 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine)

Elizabeth Coleman Morrison Obit

In the 1880 census, Luther and Hannah were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine and living with Hannah’s parents.

iv. Mary Jane Coleman b. 1832 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. Chicago, Cook, Illinois; m1. c. 1861 to Edward Small (1831 – 1911); m2. 23 Nov 1866 Age: 34 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine to Charles W White (b. 1827 New Brunswick – )

In the 1870 census, Charles and Mary J were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

v. Nathaniel Bryant Coleman b. 13 Oct 1833 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 3 Mar 1927 in Redwood Township (Los Gatos), Santa Clara, California; m. 1866 to Leonora Wilson (b. Sep 1837 in Gorham, Cumberland, Maine – d. aft 1920 census in Redwood, Santa Clara, California) Leonora’s parents were Hubbard Wilson (b. 1809) and Elizabeth [__?__].

Nathaniel enrolled in Colby College in 1859 and in 1860 transferred to Princeton. The death of a brother called him back to Maine and the outbreak of war put an end to his college course. He enlisted as a Hospital Steward on 15 Aug 1862 in Company S, 17th Infantry Regiment Maine on 15 Aug 1862. Promoted to Full Assistant Surgeon on 22 Nov 1863. Mustered Out Company S, 17th Infantry Regiment Maine on 4 Jun 1865 at Washington, DC.

In 1865 he graduated in medicine from Dartmouth and practiced medicine and surgery in New Hampshire, California and Washington. (See his bio from Princeton’s Fortieth-year Book)

In the 1880 census, Nathaniel was a physician in San Francisco.

Charles Milton Coleaman’s son Nathaniel was a doctor and Civil War surgeon.

Nathaniel Coleman Bio 2

vi. Hiram Oliver Coleman b. 24 Feb 1836 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1 Aug 1891 in Union Cemetery, Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 12 Jan 1865 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine Age: 28 to Carrie O. Small (b. 1844 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine – d. 10 Nov 1889 in Vassalboro) Carrie’s parents were Timothy Small (1807 – 1880) and Olive [__?__] ( – 1856). Hiram and Carrie had five children born between 1867 and 1880.

In the 1880 census, Hiram and Carrie were farming in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

vii. Frances Ellen Coleman b. Jul 1838 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 19 Feb 1914 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 29 Nov 1860 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine Age: 22 to Gustavas Hussey (b. 1833 Maine – d. 17 Feb 1908 Vassalboro, Maine) Gustavas’ parents were George Hussey (1803 – 1875) and Susannah Dunham (1803 – 1892). Frances and Gustavas had nine children born between 1862 and 1879.

In the 1880 census, Frances and Gustavus were farming in Vassalboro, Maine, they had nine children.

viii. Newell Wesley Coleman b. 1842 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 26 Nov 1843 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine

ix. Vesta A. Coleman b. 1847 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1905 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 24 Dec 1873 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine Age: 23 to Josiah I. Brown (1828 Maine – 1897). Josiah divorced Esther Crie in August 1873 and married Vesta a few months later. Must be a story there.

In the 1870 census, Vesta was living at home with her parents. In the 1880 census, J. I. and Vesta Ann were living in Athens, Somerset, Maine where Josiah was a physician and surgeon with a 14 year old servant and two boarders, a lawyer and another physician and surgeon

x. Frederick H. Coleman b. 1853 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine’ d. After 1880 census when he was still living at home,

7. Dudley COLEMAN (See his page)

8. Jeremiah Coleman

Jeremiah’s first wife Sarah Buswell’s origins are not known.

Jeremiah’s second wife Mercy C. Doe was born 1804. Mercy died 19 Dec 1845 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine.

Mercy Cross – Gravestone

Jeremiah’s third wife Sarah Smiley Downs was born 3 May 1827 in Harmony, Maine. Her parents were Eben Downs and Bethiah [__?__]. Sarah died 2 Jul 1889 in Newport, Maine.

In the 1850 census, Jeremiah was farming in Vassalboro, Maine next to his brother-in-law Edward Eastman.

Some of Jeremiah’s children lost their “e” and spelled their name Colman.

Children of Jeremiah and Mercy:

i. Watson Edwin Coleman b. 19 Apr 1837 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 27 Aug 1911 in Broomfield, Colorado, Killed by a bull; m. 20 Mar 1861 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine Age: 23 to Julia Ann Sanford (b. Mar 1838 in Maine – d. 23 Feb 1919 in Colorado)

In the 1900 census, Watson was farming in Semper, Jefferson, Colorado

ii. Sarah Helen Coleman b. 1839 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. after 1850 census

iii. Harriet Frances Coleman b. 1841 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. After 1860 census

iv. Martha B. Coleman b. Mar 1843 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 17 Jul 1845 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine

Children of Jeremiah and Sarah Smiley Downs:

v. Homer (Omar) Monroe Coleman b. 8 Dec 1846 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 9 Oct 1907 in Golden, Jefferson, Colorado; m1. 1870 to Georgia [__?__] 1846 – 1880; m2. Amelia Charlotte (1844 – 1896); m3. 20 Aug 1899 Golden, Jefferson, Colorado Age: 52 to Mary Broad (b. 23 Jul 1865 in Superior, Michigan – d. 24 Feb 1947 Golden Cemetery, Golden, Colorado)

In the 1880 census, Omar was a widower and expressman in Golden, Jefferson, Colorado.

Mary Broad had first married 18 Jul 1885 in Eagle Rock, Bingham, Idaho to Owbridge Ostrander. In the 1900 census Omar and Mary were living in Golden, Jefferson, Colorado with Mary’s five children from her previous marriage.

vi. Ozias T. Coleman b. Jul 1848 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 26 Aug 1926 in Manchester, Hillsborough, New Hampshire; m. 8 Aug 1873 Portland, Cumberland, Maine Age: 25 to Caro E Ford (1855 Rockland, Knox, Maine – 1932 Manchester, Hillsborough, New Hampshire)

In the 1880 census, Ozias was a carriage maker in Newport, Penobscot, Maine

vii. Obed H. Coleman b. 1849 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; m. 10 Apr 1894 Newport, Penobscot, Maine Age: 45 to Emma May White (Varney) (1869 – )

In the 1880 census, Obed was a confectioner in Newport, Penobscot, Maine, still living with his parents.

Storekeeper, Newport ME, 1889.

viii. Rose Ella Coleman b. Mar 1853 in Athens, Somerset, Maine; d. 15 Jan 1901 in Tewksbury, Middlesex, Mass; m. 1876 to Charles Kimball French (Sep 1852 Mass. – 1926)

In the 1900 census, Rose E and Charles K were farming in Tewksbury, Middlesex, Mass.

ix. Greenlief (Greenleaf) C. Coleman b. Mar 1854 in Newport, Penobscot, Maine; d. 5 Feb 1937 Merrill Cemetery, Manchester, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire; m. 16 Sep 1873 Billerica, Mass. Age: 19 to Mary Ann Isles (1851 – 1940 Manchester, NH)

In the 1900 census, Greenleaf and Mary were farming in Manchester Ward 10, Hillsborough, New Hampshire.

x. Jeremiah F. Coleman b. Nov 1858 in Athens, Somerset, Maine; d. 31 Mar 1929 in Portland, Cumberland, Maine; m. 1883 to Etta F. [__?__] (b. Feb 1860 in Maine – d. 24 Nov 1933 in Portland, Cumberland, Maine)

Machine works//Machine works foreman, Portland ME, 1889.

In the 1900 census, Jeremiah was a machinist in Portland, Cumberland, Maine

xi. Lelia M. Coleman b. Feb 1860 in Athens, Somerset, Maine; d. aft 1920 census; m. 1885 to  Rev. Walter Franklin Prince (b. 22 Apr 1863 Detroit, Somerset, Maine – d. 7 Aug 1934 Boston, Suffolk, Mass.) His parents were Walter Marshall Prince and Elmira Jane Pray.

In the 1920 census, Walter and Lelia were living in Montclair, NJ where Walter was a clergyman and psychologist.

Walter Franklin Prince (wiki) (1863-1934) was Investigating Officer of  the Boston Society for Psychical Research in Boston during the years Harry Houdini served as an agent of the organization while investigating reportedly corrupt spiritualist mediums. Prince was an Episcopal minister, earning his two B.D.’s from Yale in 1896 and Drew Theological Seminary in 1900. He earned a PhD from Yale in 1899. Prince authored several works on the study of human psychic abilities, among them The Psychic in the House (Boston 1926), The Case of Patience Worth (Boston 1927), The Enchanted Boundary (Boston 1930). Prince was an associate of violinist Florizel von Reuter who was considered a medium. He was fiercely critical of the claims of the physical medium Margery Mina Crandon.

Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science

Famous Paranormal Researcher & Author.

Among his writings are the books:

– “The Doris Case of Multiple Personality”, 1916

– “The Psychic in the House“, c 1926

– “The Case of Patience Worth“, 1927

– “Noted Witnesses for Psychic Occurrences“, c 1928

– “Enchanted Boundary“, 1930 This book embodies the first attempt to appraise on a large scale writings hostile to psychic research. It seeks to deal fairly with persons who, through the course of more than a century, have expressed their disbelief in any facts “psychic” or “supernormal,” according to the understood meaning of these terms. It proposes to ascertain with what degree of knowledge these persons are equipped to deal with the subject, to see whether the logic they employ is such as is employed in other types of investigation or is of a sort deemed good enough only for this, and generally to analyze and set forth their polemical methodology. All of these persons are respectable, and some of them illustrious, representatives of the classes to which they belong, physical scientists, psychologists, university and college instructors, physicians, clergymen, magicians and what-not. There are more than one hundred of these to be heard in this book.

Editor, 1920 – 1925: “Journal and Proceedings” of the American Society for Psychical Research

xii. Wesley J. Coleman b. Dec 1862 in Athens, Somerset, Maine; d. 1945; m. 22 Jan 1888 Maine Age: 25 to Cora E. Peavey (Jul 1861 Maine – 1937)

In the 1900 census, Wesley and Cora were farming in Garland, Penobscot, Maine.

xiii. Nellie E. Coleman b. Dec 1864 in Athens, Somerset, Maine; d. Aft. 1930 census Chester, Rockingham, New Hampshire; m. 22 Sep 1886 Augusta, Kennebec, Maine Age: 21 to William F. Witham (1859 Maine – Aft 1930 census)

In the 1910 census, William and Nellie were farming in Manchester Ward 10, Hillsborough, New Hampshire.

xiv. Cora Belle Coleman b. 17 Nov 1865 in Athens, Somerset, Maine; d. 15 May 1943 in Carmel, Penobscot, Maine; m. 26 Nov 1885 Penobscot CO, Maine Age: 20 to Ernest Bartlett Harvey (1863 Maine – 1930)

In the 1910 census, Ernest and Cora were living in Carmel, Penobscot, Maine where Ernest was a tinsmith.

9. Martin Coleman

Martin’s wife Rebecca Doe was born 1812 in Maine. Rebecca died 13 Nov 1868 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine.

In the 1850 census, Martin was a carpenter in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine.

Children of Martin and Rebecca:

i. Emma Sturges Coleman b. 10 Sep 1839 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d.7 Apr 1910 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine; m. 9 Jul 1881 Age: 41 to Joseph Warren Quimby (29 Dec 1831 – 2 Mar 1899 Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine) His parents were Michael Quimby and Abigail Gibson.

He first married 29 Nov 1855 Claremont, Sullivan, New Hampshire Age: 23 to Elvira Bean Hurd (1835 – 1863). He married second 15 May 1864 Ashby, Middlesex, Mass. Age: 32 to Francena Osborne (1838 – 1867). He married third 20 Jun 1868 Hampstead, Rockingham, NH Age: 36 to Martha Hodge Sanborn (1830 – 1878) He married Emma fourth.

ii. Nellie Rebecca Coleman b. Sep 1842 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1928 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine; m. 10 Sep 1866 Augusta, Kennebec, Maine Age: 24 to Willard R. Stone (b. Jun 1834 in Maine – d. 1912 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine)

In the 1880 census, Willard was a shoemaker in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine

iii. Belle Celissa Coleman b. 1844 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; d. 26 Dec 1876 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine

iv. Henry M. Colman b. Jun 1846 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine; d. Bef. 1932 in Maine; m. 25 Dec 1872 Augusta, Kennebec, Maine Age: 26 to Helen J. Clark (1851 Maine – bef. 1889); m2. 13 Aug 1889 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine Age: 43 to Emily F. Dyson (1855 Mass. – Aft. 1920 census Augusta, Maine)

In the 1910 census, Henry and Emily were living in Augusta Ward 7, Kennebec, Maine where Henry was a teamster for a tea company.

v. George Asbury Colman b. 1848 in Augusta, Kennebec, Maine; d. 1924 in Waterville, Kennebec, Maine; m1. 24 Jan 1877 Augusta, Kennebec, Maine Age: 29 to Emma Frances Ballard (b. 6 Oct 1856 in Vassalboro – d. 29 Jun 1900 in Fairfield, Somerset, Maine); m2. 9 May 1903 Waterville, Kennebec, Maine Age: 55 to Minnie A. Welch (1861 Maine – 1939)

In the 1900 census, George and Emma were living in Fairfield, Somerset, Maine where George was a house carpenter.

10. Eliza H. Coleman

Eliza’s husband William Henry Fossett was born 1813 in Maine. His parents were Henry Fossett and Betsy [__?__]. William died 23 Mar 1888 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine.

In the 1850 census, William was a blacksmith in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine

Children of Eliza and William:

i. Helen E Fossett b. Aug 1838 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; d. aft 1920 in Malden, Middlesex, Mass; m. 1860 Allen Lewis (1837 Maine – 1892)

In the 1880 census, Alan and Helen were living in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine where Alan was a junk dealer.

ii. Evelyn (Eveline) Fossett b. Dec 1842 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; d. 3 Jun 1907 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; m. 1880 to William Shelden Fuller (b. Dec 1849 in Maine – d. Bristol, Lincoln, Maine )

In the 1900 census, William and Eveline were living in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine where William was a merchant.

iii. Augustus Fossett b. 5 Jan 1844 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; d. 21 Feb 1922 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; m. 25 Jun 1871 Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine Age: 27 to Cyrene Doe (1848 – 12 Jan 1906 New Harbor, Lincoln County, Maine,)

In the 1900 census, Augustus and Cyrene were farming i n Bristol, Lincoln, Maine.

iv. Abbie Fossett b. 16 Dec 1845 Pemaquid, Lincoln, Maine; d. 6 Jun 1931 China, Kennebec, Maine; m. 1866 to George A. Doe (1840 – 2 Jul 1901 Methodist Church Cemetery

East Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine) His parents were Hiram Doe (1812 – 1888) and Lydia Pierce Doe (1811 – 1900)

In the 1900 census, George and Abbie were living in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine where George was a pattern maker and their son Alva was a blacksmith.

v. Elizabeth Fossett b. 1848 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine’ d. Aft 1870 census

vi. Arad Fossett b. Feb 1851 in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; d. 2 Nov 1910 Bristol, Lincoln, Maine; m. Nettie Leeman (1853 Maine – 1918)

In the 1910 census, Arad was a blacksmith with his own shop in Bristol, Lincoln, Maine.

Sources:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/i/n/William-M-Kinney-sr/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1025.html

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/r/o/Kendal-Cross-TN/GENE2-0018.html

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=87718033

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/4105122/person/-1651159283?ssrc=

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=118212926&st=1

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12 Responses to Joseph Coleman

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  6. Philip Wright says:

    Joseph Colman was my 4th great-grandfather through daughter Eliza and her daughter Helen Fossett. Thank you for publishing this information

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  8. markeminer says:

    I added Joseph Coleman’s grandchildren, quite a chore because there were 72 in all. Most stuck close to home in Maine. Only three Civil War veterans

    Nathaniel Bryant Coleman (1833 – 1927) enrolled in Colby College in 1859 and in 1860 transferred to Princeton. The death of a brother called him back to Maine and the outbreak of war put an end to his college course. He enlisted as a Hospital Steward on 15 Aug 1862 in Company S, 17th Infantry Regiment Maine on 15 Aug 1862. Promoted to Full Assistant Surgeon on 22 Nov 1863. Mustered Out Company S, 17th Infantry Regiment Maine on 4 Jun 1865 at Washington, DC. In 1865 he graduated in medicine from Dartmouth and practiced medicine and surgery in New Hampshire, California and Washington. (See his bio from Princeton’s Fortieth-year Book)

    Daniel Bryant Coleman b. Jan 1826 in Vassalboro, Kennebec, Maine; 1905 in Kimshew, Butte, California (Near Chico); m. 1858 Butte County, Calif to Mary Elizabeth Moore (1839 – 1910)

    Daniel and his brother Henry came to the California Gold fields in 1852. Henry returned to Maine, but Daniel stayed.

    In 1976, Lois Colman, granddaughter of D.B. Colman, canyon pioneer, realized her dream of preserving the history of Butte Creek Canyon came true, with the opening of the Colman Memorial Community Museum. The museum was financed with the profits of her book “Tailings of Butte Creek Canyon”.

    Interesting things to see at the Museum at 13548 Centerville Road, Chico, CA: (between Chico and Paradise)

    Civil War Memorabilia
    Gold Mining Equipment
    Indian Basket Collection
    Antique Tools
    Old School Material
    1800′s Clothing
    Chinese Artifacts
    Antique Cooking Utensils
    New Maidu Exhibit
    Bridges of Butte Creek Canyon Exhibit

    The Honey Run Covered Bridge is part of his community. I saw it featured on the Huell Howser Show. It crosses Butte Creek and intersects with Centerville Road in Butte County, California leading to Butte Canyon where Daniel’s family lived. It is located about halfway in between Chico and Paradise in northern California. It is one of the few covered bridges left in California and is the only tri-span bridge in the United States.

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