George Allen the Elder

George ALLEN the Elder (c. 1568 – 1648) was Alex’s 10th Great Grandfather two times over; two of 2,048  in this generation of the Miller line.  His daughter Rose and son Ralph are both our ancestors.

George Allen – Coat of Arms

George Allen was born before 1568 in Weymouth, Dorset, England.  His parents were Ralph ALLEN and Margaret WYOTT.  He married Katherine [WATTS?] 26 Oct 1592 in Scraptoft, Leicestershire, England.  After his first wife died, he married Katherine [Starkes?] about 1624 in London, England. He and his family immigrated with the Hull Company and arrived in Massachusetts Bay Colony on 6 May 1635 from England.   George died 2 May 1648 in Sandwich, Mass.

Katherine Watts was born 7 Oct 1576 in North Petherton, Somerset, England.  Katherine died about 1619 in Saltford, Somerset, England.

Katherine [Starkes] was born in 1605 in Woking, Surrey, England.  Sometime after George passed away in 1648, Katherine married for a second time to a man named John Collins, who was a shoemaker in Boston. Katherine died 1656 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.

Children of George and Katherine [Watts?]:

Name Born Married Departed
1. Joan Allen 1602
Weymouth, Dorset, England
Clement Briggs
1 Mar 1631 Dorchester, Norfolk, Mass
1639
Weymouth, Mass
2. John Allen 1609
Weymouth, Dorset, England
Christina Bacon
1634 Weymouth, Dorset, England
3 May 1690 Swanzy (now Swansea, Bristol, Mass)
3. Ralph ALLEN c. 1615 Thurcaster, Leicester, England Susannah [__?__]
c. 1638
Mar 1698 Sandwich Mass.
4. Rose ALLEN 1610 Bridgewater, Somerset, England Joseph HOLLOWAY
c. 1628 Weymouth, Dorset, England
.
William Newland
19 May 1648 Sandwich, Mass
1691 Sandwich
5. George Allen c. 1619 Weymouth, Dorset, England Hannah [Calib]
1643 Sandwich
.
Sarah Lamb
6 Jun 1657 Sandwich
22 Apr 1693 Sandwich
6. Robert Allen aft. 1622
England
Unmarried 15 May 1661
Rehoboth, Mass.
(committed suicide)

.
Children of George and [Katherine Starkes?]:

Name Born Married Departed
7. William Allen c. 1627
Weymouth, Dorset, England
Priscilla Browne
21 Mar 1649/50
Sandwich, Mass
1 Oct 1705
Sandwich, Mass.
8. Mathew Allen 1629 Sandwich, Plymouth Colony Sarah Kirby
5 Jun 1657
Sandwich, Mass
6 Mar 1694/95
Dartmouth, Mass
9. Samuel Allen 10 Nov 1632
Windsor, CT
18 Oct 1718
Northampton, Mass
10. Gideon Allen 1635
Sandwich, Mass
Sarah Ann Prudden
1672
Milford, New Haven Colony
1693/94
Milford, New Haven Colony
11. Henry Allen 1637
Sandwich, Mass
Sarah Hill (Black?)
1662
.
Rebecca Sherwood (Mrs. Robert Rose)
Stratford, CT
1680
8 Nov 1690
Stratford, CT
12. Francis Allen 1643
Sandwich, Mass
Mary Barlow
20 Jul 1662
1 Dec 1696/97
Sandwich, Mass
13. Caleb Allen 27 Jun 1645
Sandwich, Mass
27 Jun 1647
Sandwich, Barnstable, Mas

George’s Life in England

Although it is not known for sure, George Allen may have been born in either Somersetshire, or Dorsetshire, England, or have at least resided in one of these places prior to emigrating. Lending some support for this belief is the fact that the Rev. Hull, and many of the other families that emigrated with George, appear to have been from one of these shires. George Allen is known to have married twice while still residing in England.   His second wife, Katherine,  accompanied George to America, and is believed to have been the mother of his youngest children. According to the roster of passengers making up the Hull party, Katherine was listed as being thirty years old in 1635, thereby indicating that she had probably been born in about 1605 in England.

Although one commonly sees postings and family write-ups that indicate that our George Allen is the George Allen who married as his second wife, Katherine Starkes, on 5 Nov 1624 in All Hallows Church, Honey Lane, London, there is no documentation that would support that this is the same George Allen. On the contrary, there is evidence that suggests that this George Allen was the son of Richard Allen of the Tower of London, and that he was still residing in London, England as late as 1640, when he was mentioned in his brother, Henry’s, will. This George Allen is also believed to be the same George Allen who died at St. Michael Queenhithe, London on 26 Mar 1664.

In addition to the above, it has also been accepted by some that our George Allen was the son of John Allen of Saltford in Somersetshire, England. As with the above assertion, there is no evidence that I know of to substantiate this. There is, however, strong evidence that indicates that this George Allen was still residing at Saltford in 1638, when he was involved in a court case regarding tenements in the Tything of Saltford. By 1638, our George Allen was already well established at Sandwich on Cape Cod. Aside from the fact that a person named George Allen was identified as living in Saltford, England during the 1630’s, any connection to our George Allen appears to be based more on conjecture than supportable facts.

The same also appears to be true regarding the assertion that our George Allen was the son of Ralph Allen of Thurcaston, England. Even though there were two individuals named Ralph Allen who were associated with our George Allen in New Plymouth Colony, I am not aware of any evidence, other than name similarity, to support this contention either.

The Hull Company

George’s name, along with the names of those he emigrated with (106 in all), was discovered on a list of passengers who departed from Weymouth, England for the New World on 20 March 1635.   The Hull Company under the leadership of the Rev. Joseph Hull, was granted leave to settle at Wessaguscus Plantation by the General Court at Boston.  Wessaguscus was soon given municipal rights, at which time it was renamed Weymouth, and its inhabitants were allowed representation in the General Court at Boston.

The Allen family appears on a  listing of immigrant ships and their passengers of the Hull Company. This ship sailed from Weymouth on 20 March 1635  and arrived on 8 July 1635.

46 George Allin, aged 24 years.  (George ALLEN the Elder was a much older man in 1635, closer to 54. He had been preceded by two sons (by a first wife) Henry and Samuel, who came in 1629-30.)

47 Katherine Allin, his wife, aged 30 years.
48 George Allin, his son, aged 16 years.
49 William Allin, his son, aged 8 years.
50 Matthew Allin, his son, aged 6 years.
51 Edward Poole, his servant, aged 26 years.

Actually, we believe that George was a bit older than 24 years old, closer to 54 years. The George Allin, 16 was a son by his first wife, not Katherine

“Reputedly Anapabtists, Rev. Hull and his flock, including the Allens, first settled at Lynn, MA but in 1637 George Allen with Edmund FREEMAN and 7 or 8 others joined in buying the Township of Sandwich on the North shore of Cape Cod, an area inhabited by friendly Indiants. George’s name is on the first list of church members there (1638) and in 1639 he was elected “Constable”, a very important office, representing the entire civil authority for the orderly proceedings of the Township.

George’s Life in America

In 1640-42 he was Deputy to the General Court at Plymouth and in 1641 was one of a committee to divide the land among the settlers and given 6 1/2 acres for this task. In 1646 he built his home about 1/4 mile from the Quaker Friends Meeting House on the main road down the Cape – a home which was still standing 236 years later until 1882.”  George died in 1648 at the age of 80.

Although no records have been found to verify it, shortly after settling at Wessaguscus (Weymouth), George and his family may have moved to the village of Saugus, Massachusetts (now Lynn, Massachusetts). Sometime during the period 1637/38, however, George and his family again moved, this time to the newly organized settlement in New Plymouth Colony of Sandwich on Cape Cod. George, who was a farmer by trade, was subsequently recommended for “freeman” status in New Plymouth Colony on 5 March 1638/39, and was later admitted as such on 3 September 1639. George was later sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 June 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644. and was Deputy to the New Plymouth Court during the 1640’s.

George was an Anabaptist, a sect originating in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1523, which rejected infant baptism, advocated separation of church and state, so it is easy to understand his family’s sympathy with the Quakers.

George apparently died during the latter part of April 1648 at Sandwich, New Plymouth Colony, as he was subsequently buried there on 2 May 1648. George’s will was later probated before the New Plymouth Court on 7 June 1648, and one year later, on 8 June 1649, his widow, Katherine, furnished an inventory of George’s estate to the New Plymouth Court.

Although the identities of all of George’s children have never been determined beyond all doubt, the names of eight children have been verified through various documents. In addition to these eight, it is highly probable that three other individuals, namely John, Robert, and Francis Allen, are also sons of George. Aside from those children that are known and very probable, some researchers also believe that the Joan Allen who married Clement Briggs at Dorchester in 1630/31, and the Joshua Allen who married Mary Crowell at Yarmouth in 1671, are also George’s children.

It should also be mentioned that the “five least children” that George referred to in his will have not been verified beyond all doubt either. However, these children, who have been interpreted by most authorities to be the children George Allen had with his second wife, Katherine, are strongly believed to be Matthew, William, Henry, Samuel, and Gideon.

George Allen – Biography 1

George Allen – Biography 2

George Allen – Biography 3

Children

1. Joan Allen

Joan’s husband Clement Briggs was born 1587 in Southwark, Surrey, England. His father was John Briggs. Clement died 23 Dec 1648 Weymouth, Norfolk, Mass.

Savage’s Genealogical Dictionary

BRIGGS, Clement, Plymouth, came in the Fortune, 1621, probably young; removed to Dorchester, there married, 1630 or 1631 early, Joan Allen, for officiating at which ceremony Thomas Stoughton [son of our ancestor Rev. Thomas STOUGHTON], the constable, was fined £5 at the March Court in 1631.

[Stoughton had exceeded his authority and at that time, the Governor received a fee of £5 for performing marriage ceremonies] “A Court of Assistants, holden att Boston 1th of March 1630-31. Mr. Tho: Stoughton, Constable of Dorchester, is fyned 5 pounds for takeing upon him to Marry Clemt Briggs & Joane Allen, & to be imprisoned til hee hath paid his fyne.” but 6 Sept. 1638, the fine referred to was discharged. ]

Thence he removed to Weymouth, 1633, had a son, Thomas, b. June 14, 1633, also Jonathan, b. June 14, 1635; John, David, b. Aug. 23, 1640, and Clement, b. Jan. 1, 1643. Grievous is our feeling of regret at finding the Court in June 1638, led to forbid the wife to come into the company of Arthur Warren, as we are compelled to fear the marriage was imprudent. Before he died he had another wife, Elizabeth. Of his will, the abstract is given in (N. E.) “Genealog. Keg. VII 233,” but the envelope on it is labeled Mart/ Mouth, which the blundering clerk read for Weymouth, the residence of the testator. His inventory of Feb. 23, 1649, was labeled Osomunt Bray, full evidence of knowledge by the scrivener of the old writing. In vol. IX. of the “Register” the correct name is given. (Estate prized by Robert Tucker, 23 last mo. .’48. Testified before Mr. Bellingha’m, 24 (8) 1650. William Aspinwall, Recorder.) His son Thomas was of Taunton, 1668, and number of descendants in that vicinity.

Joan Allen and Clement Briggs Timeline

1. Lands Recorded – Granted; 1623; Plymouth Colony, MA 2 3. Page 6 of the colony records: The fales of their grounds which came in the Fortune according as their lots were cast 1623. This ship came Novr 1621; these lye to the sea, eastward: Clemente Brigges – 1

“1 Acre beyond the first brooke to the wood westward.” [Records of the Colony of New Plymouth, 1:5]

2. Division of Cattle; 1 Jun 1627; Plymouth Colony, MA 4. Number 10 in the fourth lot for the division of cattle. This group received “one of the 4 heyfers Came in the Jacob Called Raghorne.”

3. Removal; Bef 6 Feb 1630/31; Massachusetts Bay Colony, MA. Mentioned in the letter from William Bradford, Governor of Plymouth Bay Colony, to John Winthrop, the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: “Now ther are diverce goone from hence, to dwell and inhabite with you, as Clement Brigges..”

Some have argued that Clement Briggs and the others who went to Massachusetts were not of the original Pilgrim group and left for religious reasons. Another possibility is that Clement and the others were granted land in Weymouth before the boundary was drawn between the two colonies. Clement, as a fellsmonger, may have relocated to Weymouth in order to obtain the bark from a certain species of oak tree used in the tanning process

4. Fine; 6 Oct 1634; Massachusetts Bay Colony, MA. Clement Briggs fined 10s for entertaining an Indian without leave.  At a Court, holden at Newe Towne October 6th, 1634 Clemt Briggis is ffined Xs for entertaineing an Indean without leaue, & is enioyned forthwith to discharge himselfe of him.” (Record of the Gov. Mass. 1:132) “At a Generall Court, held at Boston, the 6th day of the 7th Month 1638. Dicto, (6Oct. 1634) Clement Brigs, being fined 10 shs, is discharged by the Court.” (Rec. of the Gove. Mass. 1:244)

5. Lands Recorded; 8 Oct 1637; Plymouth Colony, MA. Clement Briggs exchanged four acres of land in Plymouth for four acres of land on “Joanes” River. The deed was recorded by Gov. Bradford.

“Know all men by these prnte that I Clement Briggs of Wessaguscus for and in consideracon of the sume of fiue shillings inmoney to me paid by John Browne of Plymouth the eight day of October 1637 do couenant and graunt that the said John Browne [our ancestor John BROWNE Sr. ] shall haue and ejoy for him and his heirs foreuer foure acres of land of the vpper end of that lot of land that appertaineth vnto me the said Clement Briggs and that the said John Browne doth also agree that the sd Clement Briggs shall haue for him & his heirs for euer the quantitie of foure acres of land out of the land of the said John Browne lying at the end and adjoyneing to the residue of the land of the aforsd Clement Briggs at Jonanes Riuer witnesse my hand the day & yeare aforesd. The mark of Clement ~~ Briggs. Richard Cornish witnes.” [Rec. of the Colony of New Plymouth, 1:22]

6. Provided Bond; 6 Mar 1637/38; Massachusetts Bay Colony, MA. On 6 Mar, 1637/8, clement Briggs was bonded for £10 for his wife to appear in the next court for Arthur Warren being in her company. [Rec. of the Governor and Company of Mass. Bay Colony, 1:219, 233, & 244] There is no evidence that this was in any way a moral charge against Joan Briggs.

The records (Rec. Gov. Mass 1:219) are as follows:

“At a Quarter Court, held at Newetowne the 6th day of the first month (March) 1637-1638. Clement Briggs is bound in 5 pounds for his wifes appearance at the next Quarter Court. The presentment of Arthur Warren, for keeping company with Clement Briggs wife, was found to bee true.” 1.233 “At a Courte of Assistants, held at Cambridge, the 5th day of the 4th Mo. anno 1638, being a Qrter Courte. Clement Brigs his wife is enioyned not to come into the Company of Arthur Warren.”

7. Deposition; 29 Aug 1638; Weymouth, Plymouth Co., MA. The Deposition of Clement Briggs of Weymouth felmonger, taken at New Plymouth the xxix day of August in the fourteenth yeare of ye now reigne of our sovaryne Lord Charles by the grace of God of England &c. 1638, before Thom Prence [Gov. Thomas PRENCE] of New Plymouth gent ovr, and Willm Bradford for the same Gent, assistant of the govnt &c.

“This Deponent Deposeth and sayth that about two and twenty yeares since, this depont then dwelling wth one Mr Samuel Lathame in Barmundsey street Southwarke, a felmonger, and one Thomas Harlow then also dwelling wth Mr. Robte Heeks in the same street a fellmonger, the said Harlow and this depont had often conferrence together how many pelt eich of their masters pulled a week. And this depont deposeth and sayth that the said Robte Heeks did pull three hundred pelts a week, and divers tymes six or seven hundred & more a week in the killinge seasons, wch was the most part of the yeare (except the tyme of lent) for the space of three or foure yeares. And that the said Bobte Heeks sould his sheeps pelts at that tyme for fourty shillings a hundred to Mr Arnold Allard, Whereas this Deponts Mr Samuel Laythame sould his pelts for fifty shilling p C to ye same man, at ye same time, and Mr Heeks pelts were much better ware.

CLEMENT BRIGGS his mark.”

8. Occupation; 29 Aug 1638; Weymouth, Plymouth Co., MA. Describes himself as a fellmonger [tanner] in a deposition.

9. Lands Recorded – Sold; 29 Aug 1638; Plymouth Colony, MA. Recorded by Gov. Bradford: “Memorand the XXIXth day of August 1638 ‘That Clement Briggs acknowledge that for a good & valuble consideracon he hath sould unto Mr. Robte Heeks one acre of land in the upper fall neere the second Brooke & all his right title & interrest into the same to haue * to hold the acre of land unto the said Robte Heeks his heirs and assignes for euer to therr onely pper use and behoofe foreuer.'” [Rec. of the Colony of New Plymouth, 1:34]

10. Court Appearance; 4 Dec 1638; Massachusetts Bay Colony, MA. Clement Briggs was found not guilty of estortion and the case discharged. [Rec. of the Governor and Company of Mass. Bay Colony, 1:247]

11. Lands Recorded – Granted; 6 Oct 1640; Plymouth Colony, MA. Clement Briggs was granted land on the south side of “Joanes Riuer.”[Jones River]  [Rec. of the Colony of New Plymouth, 1:123]. On 6 Oct the bounds of Clement Briggs’ land were set. [Rec. of the Colony of New Plymouth, 1:133]

12. Lands Recorded; 15 Oct 1640; Plymouth Colony, MA. On 5/15 Oct, 1640, John HOWLAND, Francis COOKE, Joshua Pratt and Thomas CUSHMAN Sr. were appointed to examine and adjust the bounds between the lands of Thomas Pence [Thomas PRENCE] and Clement Briggs, at Jones River.

13. Debt Owed To; 1 Jun 1646; Plymouth Colony, MA. Clement Briggs made it known to the Court that Mr. “Isaack Allerton” [our ancestor Isaac ALLERTONwas indebted to him for the sum of £7 [Rec. of the Colony of New Plymouth, 2:101]

2. John Allen

John’s wife Christina Bacon was born 1611, in Huverton, Leicestershire, England and died after 27 May 1690 in Swanzy (now Swansea, Bristol, Massachusetts).

John and his youngest half-brother Gideon were founders of Swansea, Mass. In 1667 the first Baptist church in Massachusetts relocated to Swansea from Rehoboth after experiencing religious intolerance there, and Swansea was incorporated as an independent town.

He and his wife Christian emigrated to New England in the Winthrop Fleet about 1630 in the ship “Abigail“.     He settled in Scituate, MA upon his arrival. By 1633, he was living in Scituate and he also owned lands in Plymouth, MA. He owned land in Springfield, MA in 1639.     John  was one of the original settlers of Rehoboth. He was granted land there in 1643. His homelot was  located next to that of John Miller and Obediah Holmes. John was is Newport, RI in 1651, and in Swansey, MA in 1669.     John and his wife had at least, four children.     He died in Swansey at the age of eighty five on March, 12, 1689. His will was probated on May 27, 1690. He mentioned his wife Christina, and also his sons, John, Isack, Daniel and his daughter Deborah [Allen] Buckland. [Deborah married Joseph Buckland, son of our ancestor William BUCKLAND] He also mentioned his grandchildren, John and Samuel, sons of his son Daniel, and Deborah Buckland Cole, wife of Hugh Cole.   His son Reverend John Allen was the third independent pastor in Woodbridge New Jersey. He was employed in September of 1680. During the entire 15 year existence of the town from the first permanent settlers in 1665 to Mr. Allen only 9 months of religious services had been enjoyed. John Allen was well liked and continued to preach until ill health forced him to retire sometime in late 1685.  Christina died after 1690.

Children of John and Christina:

i.  John Allen   b. ~ 1637 in New Plymouth Colony, Mass.;  d. 1723 at Swansea, Bristol, Mass.; Unmarried

ii.  Elizabeth Allen b. in New Plymouth Colony, Mass.;  m.  13 Nov 1674 Swansea, Bristol, Mass to John Fairweather

iii. Isaac Allen  b. ~ 1642 in New Plymouth Colony, MA.;    d. 1692 at Rehoboth, Bristol, Mass.; m1. 30 May 1673 at Rehoboth, Bristol, Mass.  to Mary Bowen (b. 18 Jan 1652 in Rehoboth – d. 20 Aug 1678)    Mary’s parents were Obidiah Bown and Mary Clifton.  Isaac and Mary had one son Isaac Jr (b. 1674).

m2. ~ 1682 to Katherine Balcom.( b. ~ 1661 Providence RI – d. 1729 Cumberland, Providence, Rhode Island)   Katherine’s father was our ancestor Alexander BALCOM Sr. (~ 1630 – 1711)  Isaac and Catherine had four children born between 1683 and 1691.

Will of Isaac Allen of Rehoboth., dated 3 Oct 1692, probate. date not stated; rec 8 May 1695. Wife Katherine. Only son Nehemiah (minor). Daughters. Katharine (eldest), Sarah & Deborah (last 2 minors) . Brother John Allen & Thomas Reed, Overseers. Wit: Jonathan Sprague, John Allen & Bethiah Allen.

Acct of Estate of Isaac Allen of Reho, pres. by Anthony Sprague of Reho. rec 8 May 1695. Order for div. of Est of Isaac Allen datedd 5 Jan 1693 bewn. Anthony Sprague & chldn. of Isaac Allen. Div of lands held in partner. by Isaac Allen dcd & Anthony Sprague of Rehoboth. Comm: John Allen, Thomas Reed, Joseph Buckland, Sr & Daniel Jencks. dated 16 Jul 1694.

After Isaac died, Katherine married   Daniel Jenckes (b. 19 Apr 1663 in Lynn,Essex,Mass.)  His parents were Joseph Jenckes and Elizabeth [__?__]   Katherine and Daniel had eight more chilldren born between 1692 and 1705. Daniel Jenckes was the town clerk of Attleboro in 1699, and served as selectman from 1697 until 1704.   Daniel died in Mar 1736 in Cumberland, Providence, Rhode Island

iv.  Deborah Allen    b. in New Plymouth Colony, Mass.;    d. 1 Apr 1720 at Rehoboth, Bristol. Mass.;   m. 5 Nov 1659 Rehoboth, Bristol, Mass to Joseph Bucklin

v. Daniel Allen  b. 21 Apr 1648 in New Plymouth Colony, Mass.;  m. 12 Oct 1670 Bristol, Mass. to Mary Dexter

3. Ralph ALLEN (See his page)

4. Rose ALLEN (See Joseph HOLLOWAY‘s page)

5. George Allen

George immigrated in 1635 with his parents and the Hull Company.

George’s first wife Hannah [Calib?] was born about 1625, and died before 1657 in Tisbury, Dukes, Massachusetts Colony. I’m not sure Calib was really her last name because another Hannah Calib was born 21 Jun 1646 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass; and died 25 Jul 1714 in Tisbury, Dukes, Mass.

George’s second wife Sarah Lamb was born 1633 Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England. Sarah died 1693.   George was reprimanded by the Quakers for his 1657 marriage to Sarah who was not a Quaker, and later, on 3 June 1687, he acknowledged his wrongdoing. [unconfirmed single source] There were no issue from George’s second marriage.

After their marriage, George and Hannah made their home at Sandwich in the New Plymouth Colony of Massachusetts (now within Barnstable County, Massachusetts). According to various court records, George was fined on 8 June 1651 for failing to serve as a juror, and on 7 Oct 1651 both he and Hannah were fined for failure to attend public worship. George was also fined on several occasions for refusing to take the Oath of Fidelity to the King. In 1675, however, records indicate that George changed his mind and took the Oath of Fidelity.

Although the available land records indicate that George purchased land in 1670 in that portion of the Province of East Jersey that was later formed into Monmouth County, New Jersey, they apparently never moved there. The majority of their children, however, eventually moved to New Jersey, settling in either Burlington County, or in the vicinity of Shrewsbury in Monmouth County.

In 1683, George’s relationship with the Quakers of Sandwich became strained over the marriage of their daughter, Lydia, to Edward Wooley who was not a Quaker.

George Jr. Timeline

1643 – He was on the list of those able to bear arms in Sandwich, MA.

7 Nov 1651 – The town voted the he be one of a committee of five to be responsible for disposing of whales which washed up on the shore within the limits of the town. In Nov 1652 he was one of six appointed to take care of all fish [whales] that the Indians should cut up, and dispose of same for the benefit of the town. The committee had to take care of the whale cut up by the local Indians, provide casks for the oil and dispose of the oil for the town’s use, an equal share going to each citizen of the town.

1654 – George Allen gave to John Ellis for tolls, four bushels of wheat ground in the mill built by John Ellis, William Swift, William Allen, and James Skiff. The mill was built by subscription and of 22 men who subscribed four Allen brothers are listed – George, Ralph, Francis and Matthew.

May 1655 – George subscribed five shillings towards building a public meeting house. Shortly thereafter he embraced the Quaker faith and was repeatedly assailed by the Plymouth government, usually on the grounds that he had refused to take the oath of fidelity (any oath being against Quaker principles).

1656 – George and his brothers conveyed land to him inherited under his father’s will.

12 Mar 1670 – George bought shares in the Indian purchase in Monmouth Co. NJ. He did not take up residence in New Jersey, rather conveying the land to his sons by deed.

23 Feb 1675 – The town recorded the name of George Allen among those who had established their right to the privileges of the town. It may be that the town was admitting him to the franchise which had been taken from him for becoming a Quaker. The list of those voted to have a just right and interest in the town privileges included George Allen plus Caleb, Frederick, John, William, Ralph, and Francis.

The records of the Sandwich Monthly Meeting of Friends also contains references to George Allen. On Nov 11, 1675, he promised to repair the thatching on the Meeting House. In 1674 he contributed one shilling toward the expenses of the committee which was to go to Plymouth to see the Governor.

In 1681 George contributed nine shillings to relieve a needy family, and, in 1683, one shilling toward buying a cow for a needy family.

6. Robert Allen

In 1645, Robert is known to have served for thirteen days in the war against the Narragansett Indians. According to available New Plymouth Colony records,

Robert, who appears to have remained single throughout his life, committed suicide on 15 May 1661 in the home of his elder brother, John, at Rehoboth in the New Plymouth Colony of Massachusetts.

.

Children of George and Katherine Starkes:

7. William Allen

Although William Allen was shown as being eight years of age in the Hull Company’s list of passengers departing Weymouth, England on 20 March 1635, he was not shown on the list of men from Sandwich who were between the ages of sixteen and sixty and able to bear arms in the New Plymouth Colony of Massachusetts. His brother, Matthew, was listed, however. This list had been compiled in 1643 and is believed to be more accurate than the passenger list. As such, the ages of William (8) and his brother, Matthew (6), are believed to have been reversed on the passenger list.

William’s wife Priscilla Browne was born 1627 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass. Her parents were Peter Brown, a signer of the Mayflower Compact, and his wife, the widow Martha Ford.   Priscilla and William had no children.  Priscilla died 17 Feb 1697 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.

William and Priscilla resided at Sandwich  for the remainder of their lives.  Both William and Priscilla were very active and outspoken supporters of the Quaker movement, and over the years they were often fined for holding meetings and for entertaining visiting Quakers in their home. Aside from the monetary fines, William and Priscilla also had property seized, and on several occasions William had to endure whipping.

The Sandwich Friends Monthly Meeting, held at William Allen’s 4:3mo.: 1683 records on page 33. the intention of marriage of William Gifford to Mary Mills. “both of Sandwich”. At the same meeting, Gifford contributed 50 shillings to the meeting for the purchase of a cow. The marriage took place at the Meeting of 16 day 5mo.: 1683, the couple “having expressed their intentions at two meetings”. Both, again, are called of Sandwich”, and both signed the certificate (not by mark). It is interesting to note that there were thirty witnesses:  [our relations are in boldWilliam and John Newland: George. William, Francis, Jedediah, Zachariah Allen, Stephen Wing, Edward Perry, Lodowick Hauksie, Jedediah Jones. Thomas Grennell, Isaac Turner and John Goodspeed. Also Rose Newland: Susannah, Hannah and Elizabeth Jenkins: Priscilla, Hannah, Mary and two Elizabeth Allens; Lydia Gaunt, Jane Landers, Sarah Wing. Mary Perry, Mary Hauksie, Experience Goodspeed and Mary Turner. But none of the children of William Gifford signed the document, nor did James Mills, brother of the bride.

In one instance in 1661, Sheriff George Barlow of Sandwich [father-in-law to William’s brother Francis] went to William’s home while William was in jail in Boston. Having already seized the majority of William and Priscilla’s moveable property, Sheriff Barlow went into their home and took Priscilla’s last cooking pot and bag of meal. Upon doing so he sneered;

“Now Priscilla, how will thee cook for thy family and friends, thee has no kettle.”

Priscilla then replied;

“George, that God who hears the young ravens when they cry will provide for them, I trust in that God, and I verily believe the time will come when thy necessity will be greater than mine.”

William Allen died without issue on 1 Oct 1705 at Sandwich, Massachusetts in what had become Barnstable County, Massachusetts. His will, which had been written on 17 Feb 1697/98, was subsequently probated in Barnstable County on 26 Oct 1705. Although Priscilla is believed to have died in Barnstable County also, the date of her death has not been determined.

8. Mathew Allen

Mathew’s wife Sarah Kirby was born 1638 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.  Her parents were Richard Kirby and Jane [__?__]. Sarah died 21 Jul 1707 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Mass

Although Matthew was shown as being only six years of age in the the Hull Company’s list of passengers departing Weymouth, England on 20 Mar 1635, he was later shown on the list of men from Sandwich who were between the ages of sixteen and sixty and able to bear arms in the New Plymouth Colony of Massachusetts. His brother, William, was not listed, however. This list had been compiled in 1643 and is believed to be more accurate than the passenger list. As such, the ages of Matthew (6) and his brother, William (8), are believed to have been reversed on the passenger list.

Sometime after their marriage, Matthew and Sarah settled at Dartmouth in Bristol County, Massachusetts. Matthew subsequently died at Dartmouth in 1695.  His will, which had been written on 7 Feb 1688, was probated before the Bristol County Court on 23 May 1695

9. Samuel Allen

After his father, George, passed away, Samuel resided with his mother, Katherine, and step-father, John Collins, at Boston.  By a deed dated 10 July 1656, Samuel, along with his brother, Henry, sold their inherited share of their father’s land at Sandwich to their elder half-brother, George.  Although it is believed that Samuel probably married and had a family, no additional information has been found which pertains to him.

10. Gideon Allen

Gideon’s wife Sarah Ann Prudden was born 9 May 1650 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut. Her parents were Peter Prudden and Joanna Boyse.  Sarah died 1693 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut.

Milford lies in New Haven County on Long Island sound and is separated from the township of Stratford on the west by the Housatonic river, and about 10 miles S.W. of New Haven. The town, one of the original six plantations of New Haven Colony, was established in 1639, two years after the Pequot War, by Reverend Peter Prudden (lot 40). First named Wepowage, the Indian name for the river that flowed through the settlement, by indigenous tribes, Milford was purchased 12 Feb 1639 by William Fowler (lot 41), Edmund Tapp (lot 35), Zachariah Whitman (lot 32), Benjamin Fenn (lot 3), and Alexander Bryan (lot 23) from local tribes for “six coats, ten blankets, one kettle, twelve hatchets, twelve hoes, two dozen knives, and a dozen small looking-glasses.”

The Milford men came in two bodies, those of 1639 and those of 1645. Most of them were from the English counties of Essex, Hereford and York. There were fifty-four heads of families or approximately two hundred settlers. Some came from New Haven, others from Wethersfield, following Sarah’s father Rev. Peter Prudden who had ministered there between the formation of his own church at New Haven, August 22, 1639, and his ordination as pastor of the Milford church, April 18, 1640, after which Mr. Prudden took up his residence in Milford.

In the fall of 1639 a band of settlers from New Haven went through the woods guided by Indian fighter Thomas Tibbals. Peter Prudden (the Herefordshire minister) led the group.Tradition held that the pioneers of Milford were wholly or in large part discontented settlers from Dorchester and Watertown MA who traveled through the woods to Hartford, to New Haven, to Milford. Supposedly they carried the Dorchester church records with them, and the records were lost on the journey. Most of the settlers had come from London to Boston with John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton, etc. two and one-half years earlier. A year later, they went with the Davenport company to the mouth of the Quinnipiac River. The settlement at Milford was laid out in long, narrow lots, which permitted all settlers to have the same kind of land. The salt hay that grew on the marshy meadow was much prized.

Title to the region was based solely on land purchase from the Indians and not upon any grant from the English Crown. The first purchase included nearly all of the present towns of Orange and Milford, and part of the town of Woodbridge. Deeding the land to its new owners was effected with the old English “twig and turf” ceremony. After the customary signing of the deed by both parties, Ansantawae was handed a piece of turf and a twig. Taking the piece of turf in one hand, and the twig in the other, he thrust the twig into the turf, and handed it to the English. In this way he signified that the Indians relinquished all the land specified in the deed and everything growing upon it The Paugusset Indians sold the Wepawaug land in the hope that they would enlist English protection against the Mohawks, who were continually raiding their territory.

Gideon was a cordwainer.

After his father, George, passed away, Gideon resided with his mother, Katherine, and step-father, John Collins, at Boston. Along with his elder half-brother, John, and several other individuals, Gideon has been noted as being one of the original founders of the town of Swansea in what is now Bristol County, Massachusetts. Gideon later administered the estate of his step-father, John Collins, in 1670

11. Henry Allen

Henry’s first wife Sarah Hill was born around 1631.  Her parents were John Hill and Frances [__?__].  Sarah died before 1680.  There is confusion whether Henry’s wife was Sarah Hill, Sarah Black or both.  On Ancestry.com’s One World Tree 85 trees show Sarah Black, 56 show Sarah Hill and just show Sarah.

Henry’s second wife Rebecca Sherwood was born 1625 in St Michaels, London, England. Her parents were Thomas Sherwood (1586 – 1655) and Alice Seabrook (1587 – 1640). Rebecca was the widow of Robert Rose.  Rebecca died in 1704 in Greenwich, Fairfield Co., CT.

After his father, George, passed away, Henry resided with his mother, Katherine, and step-father, John Collins, at Boston. By a deed dated 10 July 1656, Henry, along with his brother, Samuel, sold their share of their father’s land at Sandwich to their elder half-brother, George.

Henry, who was a shoemaker by trade, died in 1690 at Stratford, Connecticut.

12. Francis Allen

Francis’s wife Mary Barlow was born 1634 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass. Her parents were Anthony Besse and Jane [__?__].  After Mary’s father passed away, her mother, Jane, married for a second time to the Sheriff of Sandwich, George Barlow [the sheriff who took Francis’ sister-in-law’s cooking pot – see above].   Mary died 1696 in Sandwich, Barnstable, Mass.

Francis died at Sandwich in 1698. His will, which had been written on the 18th day, 12th month, 1695 (18 February 1695/1696), was subsequently probated in Barnstable County on 19 March 1697/1698.

Sources:

http://hylbom.com/family/paternal-lines/paternal-a-to-bl/george-allen-11136/

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jacmac/allen.pdf

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~havens5/p21139.htm

http://jrm.phys.ksu.edu/genealogy/needham/d0002/I3055.html

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=12610203&st=1

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/o/x/Kenneth-E-Hoxie-1/GENE22-0003.html

A GENEALOGY OF THE ALLEN FAMILY, From 1568 to 1882. COMPILED BY HON. WILLIAM ALLEN.\ REVISED BY JOSHUA ALLEN. 1882

http://www.johnbrobb.com/JBR-ALLENtrees-R.htm

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23 Responses to George Allen the Elder

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  14. markeminer says:

    Beverly Snyder says:
    June 25, 2012 at 10:33 am (Copied from “About”)
    I am really confused on your ancestry of George Allen the Elder.
    You have listed 7 children born to George Allen and Katherine Starkes Allen. Yet in your detail listed down lower you make the following two statements:

    First statement – You mention 5 children not 7:
    “Although it is not known for sure, George Allen may have been born in either Somersetshire, or Dorsetshire, England, or have at least resided in one of these places prior to emigrating. Lending some support for this belief is the fact that the Rev. Hull, and many of the other families that emigrated with George, appear to have been from one of these shires. George Allen is known to have married twice while still residing in England. His second wife, Katherine, accompanied George to America, and is believed to have been the mother of his five youngest children. According to the roster of passengers making up the Hull party, Katherine was listed as being thirty years old in 1635, thereby indicating that she had probably been born in about 1605 in England.”

    Second statement – You are identifying why your Katherine was not Katherine Starkes :
    “Although one commonly sees postings and family write-ups that indicate that our George Allen is the George Allen who married as his second wife, Katherine Starkes, on 5 Nov 1624 in All Hallows Church, Honey Lane, London, there is no documentation that would support that this is the same George Allen. On the contrary, there is evidence that suggests that this George Allen was the son of Richard Allen of the Tower of London, and that he was still residing in London, England as late as 1640, when he was mentioned in his brother, Henry’s, will. This George Allen is also believed to be the same George Allen who died at St. Michael Queenhithe, London on 26 Mar 1664.”

    Please clarify these two statements and include any documentation on your findings.

    Thanks
    Beverly

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Bev,

      I reviewed the source material and conclude that not too much is certain about George Allen’s wives except that he had two of them and the second’s first name was Katherine. I’ve put brackets and question marks around their names to indicate the uncertainty.
      Thanks for the heads up, Mark

  15. Patrick Flower says:

    Hello:
    When George Allen was still in England, I believe he was an attorney. with my 11x g grandfather, Lamorock Flower of Saltford. This case was from May 8, 1627, that involved a Rice Davis Esq. of Ticknam, Somerset and George Allen. I researched Mr. Allen to see if there was any more association between Mr. Allen and my g grandfather. Sincerely, Patrick M. Flower

  16. Patrick Flower says:

    I’m trying to find my ancestry in England and I’ve linked together George Allen of Saltford and Lamorock. Flower, both attorneys.
    If anyone has additional information on Lamorock Flower, 1579 – 1639, please contact me. I’m Patrick Michael Flower 513 Pleasant Street, Ionia, Michigan 18846 – 1248.
    Thank You,
    Patrick Flower
    patrick.flower@yahoo.com

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  19. I have been studying and restudying your information on George Allen and his family, and trying to find supporting references elsewhere. On the subject of Joan Allen who married Clement Briggs, do you have any supporting references to the claim that she was the daughter of George, other than her name? I cannot find any, and it may save me some wear and tear, not to mention frustration, if you help me out here.

    Thanks,
    Katrina Haney
    kat@katstuff.com

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Katrina,

      Clement Briggs was a first commer arriving in 1621 on the Fortune so a lot is written about him. About half his genealogies say Joan was the daughter of George Allen and the other half leave her parents blank. Joan appears in the historical record twice:

      On 1 March 1630/31, Constable Thomas Stoughton was fined £5 by Governor Winthrop for “taking upon him to marry Clemt and Joan Allen.” Stoughton had exceeded his authority and at that time, the Governor received a fee of £5 for performing marriage ceremonies.4

      On 6 March 1637/38 Clement was bonded £10 for his wife to appear in the next court because Arthur Warren had been in her company; there is no evidence that this was a moral
      charge against Joan. Clement was found not guilty of an extortion charge on 4 December 1638.

      George Allen and family immigrated with the Hull company in 1635, four years after Clement and Joan were married. The Allen family appears on a listing of immigrant ships and their passengers of the Hull Company. This ship sailed from Weymouth on 20 March 1635 and arrived on 8 July 1635.

      46 George Allin, aged 24 years. (George ALLEN the Elder was a much older man in 1635, closer to 54. He had been preceded by two sons (by a first wife) Henry and Samuel, who came in 1629-30.)

      47 Katherine Allin, his wife, aged 30 years.
      48 George Allin, his son, aged 16 years.
      49 William Allin, his son, aged 8 years.
      50 Matthew Allin, his son, aged 6 years.
      51 Edward Poole, his servant, aged 26 years.

      Actually, we believe that George was a bit older than 24 years old, closer to 54 years. The George Allin, 16 was a son by his first wife, not Katherine.

      Maybe Joan came with her brothers Henry and Samuel in 1629/30, but as far as I know there is no historical record of this.

      Rgds, Mark

      /

  20. torhylbom says:

    I wasn’t sure f you were aware of the monument to George Allen in the Zion Church cemetery in Ellisburg, New York. I have a picture on my website: http://wp.me/P2HCbU-U. He’s almost certainly not buried there – probably just erected there my his descendants (my ancestors) as a memorial. I need to go back over all of the information I’ve written on this line, which is exceptionally complicated due to the similarily of names in multiple generations, some of whom may or not be in the same family. I’m descendend from a few different siblings within this branch of my tree.

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