Benjamin Turck

Benjamin TURCK (1723 – 1810) was Alex’s 7th Grandfather; one of 256 in this generation of the Shaw line.

Benjamin Turck was born in 1 Dec 1723 in Kingston, Ulster, New York. His parents were Johannes TURKand Jannetjen Van WAGENINGEN. His godparents were  Barent Benthuysz and Jannetjen van Wageningen. He married Ida Van WEYEN about 1741 in Kingston, Ulster New York. After Ida died, he married Sarah {–?__] 20 Oct 1788.   Benjamin died in 1810 in Ulster, New York.

Benjamin Turck was born, married and died in Kingston, New York.  Wiltwyck was given the name Kingston following the English takeover of the Hudson Valley in 1663.

Ida Van Weyen was born on 15 Sep 1728 in Albany, NY.   Her parents were Hendrick Hendrickse Van WIE and Hilletje BECKER.  Her maiden name is also given as Van Wie.

Children of Benjamin and Ida:

Name Born Married Departed
1. Jannetjen Turk 4 Jun 1749 Kingston, Ulster, NY William Schepmoes
1776
Kingston, Ulster, NY
2. Hilletjen Turk 2 Dec 1750 Kingston, Ulster, NY James William Whitaker
27 Apr 1770 Kingston, Ulster, NY
Ulster, NY
3. Catharina Turk 16 Aug 1752 Kingston, Ulster, NY Phillipus Van Keuren (Van Curen)
5 Dec 1772 Kingston, Ulster, NY
4. Johannes A. (John) Turk 12 May 1754 Kingston, Ulster, NY Geesje Whitaker
13 May 1779 Kingston, Ulster, NY
.
Elisabet Osterhout
22 Feb 1801 Kingston, NY
5. Henry (Hendrick) TURK 5 Sep 1756 Kingston, Ulster, New York Jannetje BRINK
6 Mar 1778 Ulster County, New York
.
Catharina Wittaker
4 Jul 1801 Kingston, Ulster, NY
12 Mar 1833 Kingston, Ulster, New York
6. Jacob Turk 6 Jan 1759/60 Kingston, Ulster, NY Annatje Folant
30 Jan 1788 Kingston, Ulster, NY
26 Jan 1808 New York
7. Sara Turk 20 Sep 1762 Kingston, Ulster, NY Edward Oosterhout
28 Nov 1781 Kingston, Ulster, NY
.
Joseph Davis
25 Oct 1792 Kingston, NY
1802
Ulster, New York
8. Annatje Turk 29 Jul 1764 Kingston, Ulster, NY bef. 1768
9. Benjamin Turk 26 Jan 1766 Kingston, Ulster, NY Jannetje (Janneke) Burhans
13 Mar 1789 Kingston, Ulster, NY
1 Jul 1846
10. Annatje Turk 18 Dec 1768 Kingston, Ulster, NY Joseph Castel
24 Jan 1787 Kingston, Ulster, NY

Many of Benjamin’s sons and sons-in-law (indicaated with a Red X) lived in the same area of Kingston Commons Flatbush Class

Children

Benjamin’s sons Jacob, Hendrick and Johannes fought in the Revolutionary War in the Ulster County 1st Regiment under Colonel Johannes Snyder.

Snyder’s Regiment of Militia was known officially as The First Regiment of Ulster County Militia. It was the first regiment of four created in Ulster County, New York as ordered by the Provincial Congress of New York. It was also referred to as the Northern Regiment since it members were from the Northern section of Ulster County towns including Kingston, New York (then also called Esopus) and Saugerties, New York (then called Kingston Commons)

Johannes Snyder was given his commission and officially took his post as Colonel on May 1, 1776. At that time the 1st Ulster County Militia was reported to have 472 officers and men. In April of that year, he was elected to the Provincial Congress as a Delegate, and thus did not start active duty until September 1, 1776 when he was directed to proceed to Fort Montgomery in the Hudson Highlands and take command. He arrived on Sep  27.

The three months for which the Regiment had been called out expired on Nov 30. In the following year, 1777, he was with his regiment at Ft Montgomery as early as June 4. On July 30, he took his seat as a member of the Assembly in the first legislature chosen in New York State. His activity was said to be “untiring! ” He was at the head of his regiment in the Highlands, and was assigned to every court-martial convened by General George Clinton to try Tories who were active everywhere, and whom his Regiment seized on every hand. He was also a member of the Council of Safety in Ulster County. Colonel Snyder was thus in Kingston when Major General Vaughan landed to destroy Kingston, New York State’s first Capital. He could only muster 5 small cannons and about 150 men. The rest of the 1st Ulster were either with General, now Governor, George Clinton on their way to Kingston from the defeat at Fort Montgomery or as part of Colonel Graham’s Levies from Dutchess and Ulster counties which were facing John Burgoyne at Saratoga. Colonel Snyder along with Colonel Levi Pawling threw up a hasty earthwork at Ponckhonkie overlooking theHudson River and the mouth of the Rondout Creek, and a second one at the hill near O’Reilly’s Woods—the present site of Kingston’s City Hall, and placed his cannons. The British numbering over 2,000 of course drove the defenders out and commenced to torch the city on October 16, 1777. As General Vaughan wrote, “Esopus [Kingston] being a nursery for almost every Villain in the Country, I judged it necessary to proceed to that Town…they fired from their Houses, which induced me to reduce the Place to Ashes, which I accordingly did, not leaving a House.” After this, Governor Clinton assigned Colonel Snyder and a part of the regiment to assist and help rebuild the ruined city. He energetically took hold of the work with his men, and the town rapidly arose from the ashes. In 1778, and through the remainder of the war, Colonel Snyder was credited that no enemy descent was made upon exposed settlements in the northwest Catskills frontier where Governor Clinton committed its defense to him and his regiment. Part of the regiment was usually stationed at Little Shandaken to watch the approach through the valley of the Esopus Creek. Scouts constantly covered the territory from Hurley woods to the Palentine Clove along the foot of the Catskills. On at least three documented occasions, marauding Indians and Tories were turned back by finding their movements watched.

It is alleged the Regiment was founded as the Burgher Guard of Wildwijk in 1758. Captain Hendrick’s Schoonmaker’s Company of the 1st Ulster Regiment lineage continues to the Headquarters and Service Battery, 1st Battalion of the 156th Field Artillery Regiment which in 2006 was changed to become 104th Military Police Battalion.

The city of Kingston was first called Esopus after a local Indian tribe, then Wiltwyck. Settled in 1651, it was one of the three large settlements in New Netherland, the other two being Beverwyck, now Albany, and New Amsterdam, now New York City. In 1777, Kingston became the first capital of New York. This is due to the fact that during the summer of 1777, when the state constitution was written, Albany, the historic center of government of New York, was under threat of attack by Burgoyne and his army. The state’s founding fathers believed Kingston would be a safer place. Ironically, the British never reached Albany, being stopped at Saratoga, but they did reach Kingston. Shortly after the Battle of Saratoga, the city was burned by British troops moving up the Hudson River from New York City, disembarking at the mouth of the Rondout Creek on the formation the Dutch had named Ponck Hockie. Contrary to popular belief there wasn’t a large conflict between the townsfolk and the British invaders. This is because the denizens of Kingston knew of the oncoming fleet. The city had been evacuated by the time the British arrived, and the settlers had moved to Hurley, New York, which the British did not attack.

The area was a major granary for the colonies at the time, so the British burned large amounts of wheat and all but one or two of the buildings. There is some debate over exactly how much of a fight was put up against the British; one third of the local militia regiment was still to the north at Saratoga, and one third was to the south manning several forts (which were captured days before by the British). This would have left approximately 150 militiamen to defend the city against approximately 2,000 British regulars. In 1797, the capital was reestablished at Albany.

1. Jannetjen Turk

Jannetje’s husband William Schepmoes  was born 8 Dec 1745 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.  His parents were Johannes Schepmoes and Maria Van Benschoten.  William died  1785 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

William was a private in the Ulster County Militia — First Regiment in the Revolutionary War. Col Johannes Snyder. (See story above)

Children of Jannetjen and William:

i. Geertje Schepmoes b. 12 Jul 1772 Ulster, New York; d. 4 May 1848 Ulster, New York; m. 1 Dec 1793 in Kingston, Ulster, New York to Jonathon Oosterhout (b. 1765 in Kingston, Ulster, New York – d. Ulster, New York) Jonathan’s parents were Hendricus Oosterhout ( – 1761) and Pieternella Bosch (1718 – 1743). Geertje and Jonathan had six children born between 1794 and 1814.

ii. Catherine Schepmoes b. 1 Sep 1776 Rhinebeck, Dutchess, New York; d. 27 Mar 1853 Ulster, New York; m. 6 Apr 1796 in Kingston, Ulster, New York to Johannes Burhans (b. 9 Nov 1771 in Kingston – d. 6 May 1830 in Ulster, New York) Johannes’ parents were Petrus Burhans (1730 – 1802) and Johanna Van Steenbergen (1732 – 1802) Catherine and Johannes had seven children born between 1797 and 1813 in Kingston.

iii. Maria Schepmoes b. 1778 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 1800 in Kingston to Willem Miller (b. 14 Jul 1778 in Cortlandtown, Westchester, New York) Willem’s parents were Peter Miller (b. 1740) and Margarita or Grietje Montross (Matross or Montras) (b. 1742)

iv. John Turk Schepmoes b. 9 Mar 1780 Rhinebeck, Dutchess, NY; d. 5 Jan 1848 Kingston, Ulster, NY; m. 11 Dec 1808 Rhinebeck to Elizabeth Burhans (b. 1791 New York – d. 10 Jun 1860)

In the 1850 census, Elizabeth was living with her brother Peter in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

v. Benjamin Schepmoes b. 27 Jul 1782 Kingston, Ulster, New York

vi. William Schepmoes b. 27 Dec 1784 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 1806 in Kingston to Elizabeth Houghteling (b. 1786 in Kingston)

2. Hilletjen Turk

Hilletjen’s husband James William Whitaker was born 23 Oct 1737 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.  His parents were Willem Whitaker (1708 – 1758) and Catharina Ploeg (1715 – ).  James died after the 1800 census in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

James served in Ulster County Militia – First Regiment under Colonel Johannes Snyder in the Revolutionary War.

Children of Hilletjen and James

i. William Whitaker b. 10 Oct 1770 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 8 Jan 1795 Katsbaan, New York to Catharina Louw (b. 25 Apr 1778 in Kaatsbaan/Saugerties, Ulster, New York – d. Ulster, NY) Catharina’s parents were Abraham Louw (1743 – 1812) and Rachel Dewitt (1745 – 1812) William and Catharina had seven children born between 1795 and 1810.

ii. Johannes Whitaker b. 23 Jan 1774 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 16 Jun 1794 in Kingston to Elizabeth Magee

iii. Benjamin Whitaker b. 9 May 1779 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 18 Feb 1860 in Marbletown, Ulster, New York; m1. 18 Jul 1790 in Kingston to Catharina Felten ; m2. 16 Feb 1800 Marbletown, Ulster, New York to Elisabeth Middaugh (b. 28 Feb 1780 in Marbletown – d. 12 Mar 1848 in Ulster, New York) Elisabeth’s parents were Elias Middaugh (1756 – 1819) and Sarah Van Aaken (1756 – 1822). Benjamin and Elisabeth had seven children born between 1802 and 1816.

3. Catharina Turk

Catharina’s husband Phillipus Van Keuren (Van Curen) was born 25 Sep 1748 in Kingston, Ulster, New York. His parents were Matheus Van Keuren (b. 1724) and Helena Vielen (b. 1727). His 2nd Great Grandparents were our ancestors Mathijs Jansen Van KEULEN (1602 -1648) and Margriet HENDRICKSE.  Phillipus died in Ulster, New York.

Children of Catharina and Phillipus:

i. Phillipus Van Keuren b. Jan 1776 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 1812 Kingston; Burial: Old Dutch Churchyard Kingston; m. 14 Jan 1799 in Kingston to Betsy Quimby (b. 1778 in Kingston – d. 1853 in Ulster, New York; Burial: Old Dutch Churchyard Kingston) Phillipus and Betsy had four children born between 1800 and 1811.

ii. Eida Van Keuren b. 10 Feb 1782 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 15 Jul 1804 in Kingston Dutch Reformed Church to Tyarick (Tjerk) Hendricks (b. 29 May 1783 in Kingston – d. Ulster, New York) Tyarick’s parents were Jacob Hendricks (1741 – 1824) and Arriantje Louw (1751 – 1815) Eida and Tyarick had three children born between 1804 and 1809.

iii. Benjamin Van Keuren b. 28 Aug 1791 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 1850 Saugerties, New York; m. 1810 in Kingston to Heltje DuBois (b. 17 May 1789 in Kingston – d. 2 Nov 1869 in Kingston) Heltje’s parents were David DuBois and Alida Snyder.

4. Johannes A. (John) Turk

Johannes’s first wife Geesje Whitaker was born 20 Jun 1753 in Katsbaan, Ulster, New York. Her parents were Samuel Whitaker and Catryna Borhans.

Johannes’ second wife Elisabet Osterhout was born

Children of Johannes and Geesje:

i. Jacob Turk b. 16 Apr 1780 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 4 Apr 1805 in Kingston to Hilletje Whitaker (b. 1784 in Kingston, Ulster, New York) Hilletje’s parents were William Whitaker (b. 1748) and Jannetjen Turk (b. 1750) Hilletje’s uncle James William Whitaker married Jacob’s aunt Hilletjen Turk 27 Apr 1770 in Kingston (See above). Hilletje was Jacob’s second cousin. Her maternal grandparents were Johannes Turk (b. 1721) and Geertjen Swart (b. 1725) and her great grandparents were Johannes TURK and Jannetjen Van WAGENINGEN.

ii. Catherine Turk b. 2 Aug 1784 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. Hendrick Whittaker

iii. Sarah Turk b. 20 Oct 1788 Kingston, Ulster, New York

5. Henry (Hendrick) TURK (See his page)

6. Jacob Turk

Jacob’s wife Annatje Folant was born about 1767 in Kingston, Ulster, New York. Her parents were Philippusen Foland (b. 1730) and Maria Pulver (b. 1741).  Annatje died 5 Apr 1848 – Ulster County, NY.

Children of Jacob and Annatje:

i. Elizabeth Turk bapt. 18 Jan 1789 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 7 Dec 1806 Kingston to John J. Kipp. Elizabeth and John had three children between 1812 and 1816.

ii. Ida Turk b. 10 Apr 1791 Kingston, Ulster, New York

iii. Johannes Turk bapt. 31 Mar 1793 Kingston, Ulster, New York

iv. Solomon Turk bapt. 01 Jan 1796 in Kingston, Ulster, NY; d. Aft 1880 census, Kingston; m. Cornelia Boice (b. ~1797 Rhinebeck, Dutchess, New York – d. Aft. 1870) Cornelia’s parents were Ferdinand Boice (1747 – 1822) and Catharina Foland (1742 – 1838). Solomon and Cornelia had six children born between 1818 and 1842.

In the 1860 census, Solomon and Cornelia were farming in Kingston, Ulster, New York

v. Petrus “Peter” Turk b. ~1798 in Kingston, Ulster, NY; d. 12 Nov 1882 in Flatbush Reformed Church, Ulster, NY; m. Getty “Gitty” Catherine  Osterhout/Osterhoudt  (b. ~ 1804 in New York – d. 13 Sep 1875 in Ulster County, NY)  They are both buried at the Burhans Family burial ground in Ulster Co.  Peter and Getty had at least four children Abraham (b. 1834) and Amelia (b. 1837),  Gertrude “Girty” Catherine (1821-1899) and Benjamin (b. about 1840, d. after 1860). Peter remained in Ulster Co., NY, his entire life.

In the 1850 census Peter and Gitty K. were farming in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

There is another Peter Turk, born the same year who Reed Perkins believes is Jacob and Annatje’s son, Petrus “Peter” Turck b. and bapt. 11 Mar 1798 Kinderhook, Columbia, NY; d. 5 Sep 1872 Madison, Wisconsin. Buried Forest Home Cemetery in Milwaukee; m1. 1820 Greene county NY to Rachel Gay Since this Peter’s gravestone shows his birth to be in Kinderhook, Columbia, New Yok, I think it is more likely that this Peter is his second cousin, the son of Jacob Turck and Mary Klein (See Peter’s great grandfather’s page Johannes TURK for details.

vi. Maria Turk bapt. 17 Mar 1800 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. Nicholas Kierstedt Burhans (b. 07 Jan 1799 in Kingston – d. 27 Mar 1849) Nicholas’ parents were Johannes Burhans (1771 – 1830) and Catherine Schepmoes (1776 – 1853) Catherine Schepmoes was one of Maria’s older cousins.

vii. Jacob Turk b. 1802 Ulster, New York; m. 1823 in Glasco, Ulster, New York to Annatje Dubois (bapt. 4 Mar 1802 in Kingston, Ulster, New York) Annatje’s parents were Petrus DuBois (b. 1756) and Marietje Post (b. 1758)

viii. Annatje Turck b. ~ 1805 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. betw. 1870-1880; m. David H. Traver (b. ~ 1810 in New York – d. Aft. 1880 census Kingston) Annatje and David had four children born between 1836 and 1842.

In the 1850 census, David and Anna were farming in Kingston.

There is another Peter Turk, born the same year who Reed Perkins believes is Jacob and Annatje’s son, Petrus “Peter” Turck b. and bapt. 11 Mar 1798 Kinderhook, Columbia, NY; d. 5 Sep 1872 Madison, Wisconsin. Buried Forest Home Cemetery in Milwaukee; m1. 1820 Greene county NY to Rachel Gay. Since this Peter’s gravestone shows his birth to be in Kinderhook, Columbia, New York, I think it is more likely that this Peter is his second cousin, the son of Jacob Turck and Mary Klein. I think Mary may have been the daughter of Palatine Refugees and some records say Peter was born in Germantown, Columbia, New York. Peter’s second wife was born in Holland or Germany. (See Peter’s great grandfather’s page Johannes TURK for the interesting details.

ix. Abraham Turk b. ~1807 Flatbush, Ulster, New York; m. Ulster, New York to Annatje Wynkoop (b. 7 Jan 1810 in Katsbaan, Ulster, New York) Annatje’s parents were Henry Wynkoop (1769-1826) and Ariantje Louw (1771-1856)

x. Henry Turck b. 8 Apr 1809 Flatbush, Ulster, New York; m1. Eliza C. [__?__] (b. 1820); m2. 11 Oct 1855 Catskill, Greene, New York to Harriet Ludington (b. 17 Nov 1817 in Catskill – d. 22 Dec 1898) Harriet’s parents were Tertullus Ludington (1773 – 1821) and Anna Egbertson (1789 – 1861). She first married John Lusk (1815 – 1848) and had five children between 1838 and 1847.

Researcher got Henry’s name from Harriet’s listing at Catskill village cemetery then found a marriage record for her as Mrs. Jno Lusk with Henry in 1855 at Catskill Presbyterian Church see: http://dunhamwilcox.net/ny/catskill_ch.htm

7. Sara Turk

Sarah’s first husband Edward Oosterhout was born 12 Sep 1742 in Kingston, Ulster, New York. His parents were Laurens Oosterhout and Helena Whitaker. Edward died in Ulster, New York

Sarah’s second husband Joseph Davis was born  5 Jul 1761 in Saugerties NY.  His parents were Sampson Davis and Margaret Ploeg.    After Sarah died, he married 19 Aug 1802 in Kingston, Ulster, NY to Annatje “Anna” Burhans.  Joseph died 23 Sep 1836 in Saugerties and is buried in Flatbush, Ulster Co, NY in the Oosterhoudt Family Burial Ground.

The Joseph Davis who was born 12 Dec 1760 in Erie, New York and whose parents were Joseph Davis and Abigail Bradley is a different person.  This other Joseph died 1847 in New Albion, Cattaragus County, New York.

Joseph Davis Headstone — “Oosterhoudt Ground”. I had read about using shaving cream and a drywall knife to make the letters pop out and it worked well! If you want to find it, set your GPS for coordinates 42° 1’30.43″N, 73°56’35.25″W, and follow the old road to the right of the church.

Children of Sarah and Joseph

i. Catherine Osterhout b. 30 Jun 1782 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. Ulster, New York; m. 24 Apr 1800 in Ulster, New York to Christopher Van Gaasbeek (b. 6 Aug 1777 in Kingston – d. 20 Dec 1864 in Ulster, New York) Christopher’s parents were Jacobus Van Gaasbeek (1737 – 1825) and Debora Kierstede (1745 – 1836)

ii. Sarah Osterhout b. 29 Nov 1784 Kingston, Ulster, New York

9. Benjamin Turk

Benjamin’s wife Jannetje (Janneke) Burhans was born 27 Feb 1766 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.  Her parents were Jan Burhans (1727 – 1787) and Catharine Whitaker (1730 – 1773). It is a tradition in the family that Jan Burhans and four of his sons were in military service during the War of the Revolution.

Children of Benjamin and Jannetje:

i. Sarah Turk b. 4 Jul 1790 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 12 Oct 1811 in Kingston to her cousin John Castle (Castell) (bapt. 20 Dec 1789 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY) John’s parents were Joseph Castell and Annatje Turk (See below)

ii. Sueras Turk bapt. 22 Apr 1792 Kingston, Ulster, New York

iii. Catherine Turk b. 1 Jun 1795 or 3 May 1796 in Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 17 Apr 1841 in Kingston; m. 1816 Kingston to Abraham P. Post (b. 9 Feb 1793 in Kingston – d. Ulster, NY) Abraham’s parents were John A. Post (1768 – 1842) and Rachel Leroy (1776 – )

iv. Benjamin Turk b. 27 May 1799 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 10 Aug 1871; Died in Columbia Twp at 72 yrs 2 mos 14 days from congested lungs; Burial: Cement City, Cemetery, Cement City, Jackson County, Michigan m. Catherine Every (b. 1805 in New York – d.7 Oct 1898 in Lenawee, Michigan) Catherine’s parents were Reuben Every (1780 – 1855) and Elizabeth Whitman (1787 – 1855). Her grandparents were Richard Every and Abigail Emery, and her great grandparents were our ancestors John EVERY and Rachel WILLIAMS. Benjamin and Catherine had eight children born between 1830 and 1844.

v. Jacoba Turk b. 24 May 1801 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 29 Jul 1870; Burial: Cement City Cemetery Cement City, Jackson, Michigan; m. Levi Mulnix (b. 8 Nov 1804 in Kingston – d. 25 Mar 1882 in Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan; Burial: Cement City Cemetery) Levi’s brother John married Jacoba’s sister Jane. Their parents were Levi Mullinex Sr. (1765 – 1834) and Phoebe Robinson (1765 – ) Jacoba and Levi had seven children born between 1828 and 1848.

In the 1860 census, Levi and Jemima were farming in Sandstone, Jackson, Michigan

vi. Eida Ann Turk b. 13 Feb 1806 Kingston, Ulster, New York; m. 1 Jan 1826 to Silas Decker (b. 20 May 1800 Kingston – d. 26 Nob 1870 in Prattsville, Greene, NY) Silas’ parents were Laurence Decker and Lucretia Fowler Eida and Silas had six children born between 1828 and 1843.

In the 1850 census, Silas and youngest son George were living in Middletown, Delaware, New York with Henry and Emeline Hubble.

vii. Jane Bridget Turk b. 16 Jun 1811 Roxbury, Delaware, New York; d. 31 Jul 1855 Illinois; m. 1829 to John Mulnix (b. 1808 in Roxbury – d. 19 Feb 1890 Eagle Point, Ogle, Illinois) John’s brother Levi married Jane’s sister Jacob. John’s parents were Levi Mullinex Sr. (1765 – 1834) and Phoebe Robinson (1765 – ). Jane and John had seven children. After Jane died, John married Lydia Sweet (1822 – 1896) and had three more children.

In the 1850 census, John and Jane were farming in Lexington, Greene, New York

In the 1870 census, John and Lydia were farming in Eagle Point, Ogle, Illinois.

viii. John Burhans Turk b. 18 Feb 1814 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 8 Mar 1853 Burial: Cement City Cemetery, Cement City, Jackson, Michigan; m. Peninah “Paulina” Kelly (b. 28 Jan 1810 in Delaware, New York – d. 13 Apr 1871 in Lenawee, Michigan) Peninah’s parents were Thomas N Kelly (1786 – 1835) and Hannah Daugherty (1793 – 1858). John and Perinah had six children born between 1831 and 1845.

In the 1850 census, John and Peninah were farming in Columbia, Jackson, Michigan

ix. Ahasuerus Turk b. 15 Feb 1815 New York; d. 12 Mar 1878 Somers, Westchester, New York; m. Margaret Dubois (b. 23 Nov 1839 in Michigan – d. 8 Oct 1899 in Michigan) Margaret’s parents were Jacob Delamater Dubois (1808 – 1880) and Elizabeth Van Riper (1812 – 1849) Ahasuerus and Margaret had four children born between 1856 and 1868 in Columbia, Jackson, Michigan.

10. Annatje Turk

Annatje’s husband Joseph Castel was born 1764 in Kingston, Ulster, NY.

Children of Annatje and Joseph:

i. Elisabet Castell bapt. 9 Dec 1787 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY

ii. John Castell (Castle) bapt. 20 Dec 1789 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY; m. 12 Oct 1811 in Kingston to his cousin Sarah Turk (b. 4 Jul 1790 Kingston, Ulster, New York) Sarah’s parents were Benjamin Turck and Jannetje Burhans (See above)

iii. Joseph Castell (Castle) bapt. 3 Feb 1793 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY; m. 15 Jan 1824 Kingston, Ulster, NY Reformed Dutch Church to Annatje Dubois (bapt. 21 Apr 1793 Kingston Reformed Dutch Church) Annatje’s parents were Mattheus H. Dubois (1764 – 1844) and Margaret Davenport.

iv. James Castell bapt. 24 Jan 1796 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY

v. Maria Castell bapt. 23 Nov 1798 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY

vi. Ann Castell bapt. 3 Nov 1801 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY

vii. Benjamin Castell b. 2 May 1805 Old Dutch Ch, Kingston, Ulster, NY

Sources:

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=28144121

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=turk-society&id=I12626

http://genealogytrails.com/ny/ulster/marriages_index.html

Baptismal and marriage registers of the old Dutch church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York : (formerly named Wiltwyck, and often familiarly called Esopus or ‘Sopus), for one hundred and fifty years from their commencement in 1660″

Advertisements
This entry was posted in -9th Generation, Line - Shaw and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to Benjamin Turck

  1. Pingback: Henry Turk | Miner Descent

  2. Pingback: Johannes Turk | Miner Descent

  3. Pingback: Cornelius Brink | Miner Descent

  4. Pingback: Hendrick Hendrickse Van Wie | Miner Descent

  5. Rich Davis says:

    Your statement “Sarah’s second husband Joseph Davis was born 12 Dec 1760 in Erie, New York. His parents were Joseph Davis and Abigail Bradley. Joseph died 1847 in New Albion, Cattaragus County, New York.” is incorrect. Joseph Davis was born in Saugerties NY on July 5, 1761 and died on Set 23, 1836 in Saugerties. His parents were Sampson Davis and Margaret Ploeg (Osterhoudt).

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Rich,
      Thanks for the update, I’ve made the correction. My son graduated from Cornell last week and while I was in the neighborhood, I found the Caroline, Tompkins, NY graveyard where Benjamin’s grandson Cornelius Turk and family are buried. Will add photos soon. It’s fun to be able to share original research.

      Rgds, Mark

  6. Brooke Burhans says:

    Could you please tell me the date of the map of the Kingston Commons and perhaps where you found it. My family is the Burhans and lot #39 for Petrus Burhans might place the map around the 1770’s or so but with the various Abraham Burhans on the map I’m not sure if his father would be in #36 or #49… Thank you. Brooke

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Brooke,

      I found the map on a user’s page on ancestry.com. I sent them a note asking if they knew the source or date. A google search on the image name yields ” Description: Filed Dec 21 1897 in the Ulster County Records office”

      Kind Rgds, Mark

  7. Rich Davis says:

    That map was included in the book “History of the Reformed Church of Flatbush, N.Y., 1807-1907” by Peter Stryker Beekman which was published for the centennial anniversary of that church in 1907. The book can be read as a Google Book on http://books.google.com/books?id=-LXVAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false. The map reflects property ownership as of about 1807 – many of the lots were sold in 1804 and thereafter in a conscious effort to distribute the land holdings of the Corporation of Kingston. The official maps are in the Ulster County Archives, but do not include the owner’s name. Also, the numbering scheme is different.

    Regards, Rich Davis

  8. Rich Davis says:

    Oops! I’m sorry. Wrong info. The image shown is an actual photo I took at the Ulster County Archives on April 4, 2011. So these maps do include names. Not sure of the date, but it would have to be sometime after 1805 or so.

    The map in the church book has a table of names – Abram Burhans is shown as the owner of lot #72 which corresponds to lot #36 in the county map. Due to my research on my ancestor, Joseph Davis, I am familiar with the location of that lot and am quite sure it was never developed, and there are no roads, only trails there today.

    • B. Burhans says:

      Thanks to you both. I was able to find your map, Rich, on your Joseph Davis tree. I assumed the map was either from the land grants after the burning of Kingston or for the land bounty grants after 1781. Or perhaps one and the same?? It’s too bad the map from the Reformed Church of Flatbush is shortened – Isaac and Petrus Burhans’ lots are not shown to the left. I believe Abraham, Lot 36/72, is their brother also. So confusing….You stated Joseph Davis purchased his lot 37/115(?) on 16 Feb 1804, the Trustees’ Map is dated 1804 so I’m going to hope this map is circa 1804! We seem to share the Turck relatives and I’m sure a host of others. Haven’t really gotten to the Turcks yet…oh, boy… Thanks again! Brooke

      • Rich Davis says:

        A bit of history. In 1687, a patent to the Corporation of Kingston was issued with 12 Trustees responsible for all of the governmental functions of the town of Kingston. This made Kingston the first of only a dozen-odd communities ever incorporated as self-governing entities in English America. Then in 1688, Kingston Commons was chartered by the Corporation as a huge landholding, 4 miles wide and 20 miles long, with usage to be shared by the Freeholders and Commonality of the Town of Kingston.

        A few (maybe 100 or so) parcels were sold off to the earliest settlers in the period 1687 – 1803. Then in 1804, a concentrated effort was made to sell the whole Kingston Commons, which had been carved up into rectangular lots that were mostly 30 or 45 acres in size. Many were sold in 1804, but It took until 1816 to complete all sales. At that time, the Corporation of Kingston was dissolved.

        So, the map probably reflects the status as of about 1816.

        I do have 3 generations of Burhans that are my 6th, 7th, and 8th great grandparents and lived in the 1650 ~ 1750 timeframe. So, we must be some sort of cousins!

      • B. Burhans says:

        Thank you Rich for the extra info on the Kingston Commons. I added it to what I learned from the History of the Reformed Church of Flatbush. As to the map in question on your site – Petrus Burhans was still listed as owner of Lot 39. According to the Burhans Genealogy – as much as you can believe in its info – his will was proved on 12 Aug 1806 and he did not have a son Petrus who may have been put on the deed, so right or wrong I’m stating the map was made between 1781 and 1803 or so. And yes, Cousin, we seem to share Jan Jacob Burhans and on back through his father Jacob and his father Barent.

  9. markeminer says:

    (copied from “About”)
    Reed says:
    March 13, 2013 at 12:30 am (Edit)
    A very impressive site. Thanks for all the work.

    If I may, though, there is one correction that needs to be made. In the Turk/Turck line of the family you have fallen into the trap regarding Peter (Petrus) Turk/Turck. You have:
    **********
    v. Petrus “Peter” Turk b. ~1798 in Kingston, Ulster, NY; d. 12 Nov 1882 in Flatbush Reformed Church, Ulster, NY; m. Getty Osterhout (b. ~ 1804 in New York – d. 13 Sep 1875 in Ulster County, NY) Peter and Getty had at least two children Abraham (b. 1834) and Amelia (b. 1837)
    In the 1850 census Peter and Gitty K. were farming in Kingston, Ulster, New York.
    **********
    This is an error that goes back to a variety of printed genealogies and other sources. In a nutshell, there are (at least!) two Peter Turck/Turck’s from the Kingston area, both born within a decade of each other.

    The Peter/Petrus Turk/Turck born and baptized in Kingston 11 March 1798 married Rachel Gay (b. 1799, Greene Co., NY) in 1820 in Greene Co., NY, and emigrated to Mequon, Washington (later Ozaukee) Co., Wisconsin in 1837. They may have lived in the Palmyra/Macedon, NY area circa 1830-37 (I’m still working on that).

    Peter Turck and family lived in Mequon until the mid-1850s, then in Milwaukee, and he died in Madison, WI, on 5 Sept. 1872. He is buried in Forest Home cemetery in Milwaukee. I have done a lot of research on this family and I am very confident in the above information.

    He had, I believe, nine children with his first wife, Rachel Gay. Most of the children lived well into adulthood, married and had children.

    Rachel died in 1841. In 1848 Peter married again, to Christina Koehler/Kaehler. They had one daughter, who died in her teens in 1861. Christina died eleven days later.

    The “other” Peter Turck was born about 1797 in New York (near Kingston, if I recall correctly) and married Gitty Catherine Osterhout/Osterhoudt (b, 1804). They had (at least) 4 children. The two you mentioned (Abraham and Amelia, above) and also Gertrude “Girty” Catherine (1821-1899) and Benjamin (b. about 1840, d. after 1860). This Peter Turck remained in Ulster Co., NY, his entire life. He died in 1882. His wife Gitty died in 1875. They are both buried at the Burhans Family burial ground in Ulster Co.

    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you would like further information.

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Reed,

      Thanks for the information, Peter had an interesting life. Did you notice his second wife was thirty years younger? In the process of inputting Peter’s genealogy in my regular style, I noticed that his gravestone shows his birth as Kinderhook, Columbia, New York. Forty miles upriver from Kingston. Find A Grave Memorial# 91864505
      http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgiI?page=gr&GRid=9186450

      After more hunting than I originally planned, my tentative conclusion is that Peter was the second cousin of the Peter who was the son of Jacob Turk and Annatje Folant. I think it is more likely that his parents were Jacob Turk and Mary Klein. I think Mary was the daughter or granddaughter of Palantine refugees.

      I also tried to trace the career of Peter’s second wife, Christina Koehler. It looks like she was German and immigrated with her parents from Amsterdam to Philadelphia in 1832. I may have found her parents George and Catharina Kohler.

      See my page for Peter’s great grandfather https://minerdescent.com/2010/08/10/johannes-turk/
      for the details on what I discovered.

      McClasky Family Tree on ancestry.com shows Peter’s birthplace as Germantown, Columbia, New York
      http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14784953/person/19806507035

      Rgds, Mark

  10. James Henry says:

    Hi, some of the names in your tree cross into mine. I have this to show you regarding William Whitaker, Jr and his Wife Jannetjen Turck. http://prntscr.com/f5iz0a

    • markeminer says:

      Hi James,

      There were lots of marriages between the Whitakers and the Turks in this family. I have Benjamin’s Turk’s daughter Hilletjen Turk marrying James William Whitaker on 27 Apr 1770 Kingston, Ulster, NY. I have their son iv. Benjamin Turk b. 27 May 1799 Kingston, Ulster, New York; d. 10 Aug 1871; Died in Columbia Twp at 72 yrs 2 mos 14 days from congested lungs; Burial: Cement City, Cemetery, Cement City, Jackson County, Michigan m. Catherine Every (b. 1805 in New York – d.7 Oct 1898 in Lenawee, Michigan) Catherine’s parents were Reuben Every (1780 – 1855) and Elizabeth Whitman (1787 – 1855). Her grandparents were Richard Every and Abigail Emery, and her great grandparents were our ancestors John EVERY and Rachel WILLIAMS. Benjamin and Catherine had eight children born between 1830 and 1844.

      While the Benjamin Whitaker in your screen shot was born 24 Aug 1773

      Do you know how your record fits in?

      Thanks, Mark

  11. James Henry says:

    Hi Mark, Other than the document which has Benjamin Turk being married to Ida Van Wie at the time of the Baptism Im not sure. I also have this. http://prntscr.com/f6l5sg and this http://prntscr.com/f6l7uo

    Jay

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s