John Parker Jr

John PARKER Jr. (1601 – 1661) was Alex’s 10th Great Grandfather; one of 2,048 in this generation of the Shaw line

John Parker Jr. was born 20 Apr 1601 in Bideford, Devon, England. His parents were John PARKER Sr. (1568 – ) and Katherine DENNIS (1579 – 1671). He married Mary CROCOMBE 16 Nov 1622 in Georgeham Devon, England.   All their children were born in England so John moved his family to Winter Harbor between  25 July 1635 when his last child Mary was born and 7 Sep 1636, when John Parker Jr. was head of household in the Winter Harbor book of rates and assessed a tax of 1 pound for support of the minister.  John died between 31 Oct 1651 when he made his will and 20 Nov 1661 when the Deed for Parker’s Island was confirmed to his widow Mary Parker by Robinhood at her house in Sagadahoc, Maine.

John purchased Parker Island (then called Rascohegan and now called Georgetown Island,  Maine) from Sachem Robinhood in 1650.  You can see Atkins Bay, named for our ancestor Thomas Atkins in the lower left hand corner of this map.

Mary Crocombe was born 28 Jan 1600 in Georgeham, Devon, England. Her parents were William CROCOMBE (1575 – 1619) and Marjorie [_?__].  Mary died was still living 28 Jun 1671 in Maine.

Mary was baptized in  St. George Church, Georgeham, Devon

Children of John and Mary:
Name Born Married Departed
1. James Parker 5 Aug 1627
Georgeham Devon, England
1630
Georgeham Devon, England
2. Thomas Parker 1630
Bideford, Devon, England
Mary Shaw (daughter of Roger SHAW)
1649
Parkers Island, York, Maine
13 Nov 1684
Georgetown, Sagadahoc, Maine
3. John Parker 1634
Bideford, Devon, England
Margaret Fairfield
20 Jul 1660
Boston, Suffolk, Mass
Slain by Indians at the taking of the Fort Loyal,
20 May 1690 in Falmouth, Cumberland, Maine
4. Mary PARKER 25 July 1635Bideford, Devon, England Thomas WEBBER
c. 1655 in Charlestown, Mass
1700 in Georgetown, Parker Isle, Maine
5. Hannah Parker? 1638
6. Joseph Parker? 1642
7. Josiah Parker? 1645

In 1650 John Parker established the first permanent homestead on the Island of Georgetown.  He bought the island (then called Rascohegan) from a local Indian named “Robinhood”.  At that point the island became known as Parker’s Georgetown Island.  Georgetown or Georgetown-on-Arrowsic was the name given to a large area surrounding the island that included Woolwich, Phippsburg, Arrowsic and Bath and was incorporated in 1716.  But by 1841 each of these communities had incorporated, leaving Georgetown in sole possession of the name. Georgetown is home to Reid State Park, Josephine Newman Sanctuary (managed by the Maine Audubon Society), and Ledgemere Nature Preserve (managed by the Nature Conservancy)

Josephine Newman Wildlife Sanctuary is on the island that John Parker Jr. purchased from Sachem Robinhood in 1650.

Georgetown is a town in Sagadahoc County, Maine.  The population was 1,020 at the 2000 census. Home to Reid State Park, the town is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area. Located on an island accessible by car from the mainland, Georgetown includes the villages of Five Islands, Georgetown, Bay Point, Marrtown, West Georgetown and Robinhood. It is a popular tourist destination.

Reid State Park, Georgetown Island, Maine is on land that John Parker Jr. purchased from Sachem Robinhood in 1650.

John Parker Jr., first white settler of Phippsburg Center. In 1659, purchased greater part of the Town of Phippsburg from the Indians. The Indian Sachem Robinhood deeded John Parker Rashegan Island, now known as Georgetown.

Parker also owned the areas around Fort Popham and Parker’s Head. He deeded the Parker’s Head area to his godson, John Verine. Popham was deeded to Thomas Clark and Lake.

Thomas Clark and Roger Spencer bought the island called Robinhood. A blockhouse was built by them and a few settlers built homes nearby. Then Parker purchased everything in Phippsburg from Indian Robinhood except the Atkin’s lands.

Phippsburg was included in the Pejepscot grant to Purchase and Way, and after Wharton’s purchase their lands were confirmed anew to some of the purchasers.  The south part of the town was bought from the Indians by Thomas ATKINS, the remainder by John Parker, Jr. in 1659, and the northern part was assigned to his brother-in-law, Thomas WEBBER, who also obtained an Indian title.  Silvanus Davis, widely known in his day, owned and improved a farm south of Webber’s .  In 1734, Colonel Arthur Noble built a strong garrison on the north side of the peninsula near Fiddler’s Reach.  The first house of worship known in this settlement was erected near this garrison in 1736.

The Massachusetts Colonial Records show John Parker living at Dammerill’s Cove in 1645.  It appears that John II, as district manager was responsible for numerous stations including Damariscove, but according to those deeds had not moved his family to Damariscove.This location is now known as Damariscove Island.  (Google Maps Satellite View)

As early as 1604, the island was settled as a commercial fishing enterprise, with Francis Popham among those sending fishing vessels there on yearly expeditions.  Captain John Smith charted the island as “Damerils Iles” after a visit in 1614, with the name traditionally attributed to Humphrey Damerill. Damerill had been a member of the failed Popham Colony, but moved to Damariscove in 1608 to establish a store to supply the fishing community. By 1622, the island was home to 13 year-round fishermen, with 2 shallops in the winter. and up to 30 sailing ships fishing the waters in the spring. The fishermen had also constructed a fort with a palisade and mounted gun. When the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony were facing starvation in the spring of 1622, they sent a boat to Damariscove to beg for assistance. The fishermen responded by filling the colonists boat with cod which helped ensure the Pilgrim’s survival.

Damariscove had become a thriving community when in 1671, Massachusetts Bay Colony laid claim to the island, extending their eastern borders. Over the next few years, the Massachusetts General Court established a local government there, and appointed a military officer and constable. The court also granted a license for a house of entertainment, while assessing taxes for the first time.

On August 20, 1676, in the aftermath of King Philip’s War, a massive Native American assault attacked and burned every settlement east of the Kennebec River, including the nearby settlement of Pemaquid.  Approximately 300 Refugees from Pemaquid, Boothbay,Damariscotta and Sheepscot converged on the island seeking shelter. Despite the presence at the time of farms, a fort and a tavern, there were not enough provisions to support this many refugees. When nearby Fisherman’s Island was attacked a few days later, everyone crowded into boats and fled to the better protected Monhegan Island to the east. The residents did not abandon the island for long, as records indicate that a sloop was seized and a man killed in another raid later that year.

Damariscove was also the target of attacks at the start of King William’s War in 1689. Richard Pattishall, who had bought the island in 1685, was slain in the first attack. In another raid that summer, thirteen Abenaki were driven back, and no casualties were reported. Despite additional attacks in 1697 and during Father Rale’s War in 1725, Damariscove Island continued to survive as a fishing station.

20 May 1645 – Massachusetts court records state that Robert Nash, a coastal trader out of Mass Bay on a voyage downest, stopped in to Strattons Island Plantation. He began selling sack, a white wine imported from the south of Europe, to the island fishermen. Nash was himself consuming a large quantity and was, according to depositions, soon very drunk and giving it away. John Parker II also arrived there about this time with a number of fishermen either to or from Damariscove, and his men quickly joined the islanders in lining up for free drinks, as did Nash’s own crew. From all accounts Parker did not join in, but couldn’t deter his men from getting drunk. Testimony of John Parker II:

“John Parkar of Damarills Cove affermeth that Robart nash being with him gaue & sould so much sack to his men that nash himself and parkers men were all so drunk for seuarall dais together that his men could not goe to Sea in the prime tyme of fishing whereby the said parkar & his company lost 40 or 50 pownds by the misdemeanors of said nash”

Georgetown on the Arrowsic:

“In 1650 John Parker, a pioneer from Biddeford, England, bought the island from the Indian sachem who had been given the English name of Robinhood.”

John died before 20 Nov 1661, on which date the Deed for Parker’s Island was confirmed to his widow Mary Parker by Robinhood at her house.  Parker had made his will  31 Oct 1651, giving certain legacies to his children and the Island and other property to his wife Mary, who was still living 28 Jun 1671.  The home where they lived for many years was at the lower part of Parker’s Island facing the sea.

The following is an exact copy of this historical deed for Georgetown, Maine from Chief Robinhood to John Parker as the York Deeds record the purchase:

“Called the yeare of the Lord febuye 27, Know all Men by the presents that I Robert Hood D. sell to John Parker of Sacittihock — fisherman — the Island called Rasthegon lying by Sacittihock Rivers mouth upon consideration of a sum agreed upon.  I Mr. Robert Hood, Sagamoare do acknowledge to have Reseaved satisfaction. I say to the said John Parker and his assigned for Ever hereupon I set my hand and seal.”  Witness: Roger Francis and Roart f.h. Allen

Ancient Sagadahoc by E.J.Chandler “A Story of the Englishmen who welcomed the Pilgrims to the New World”

There is no record of who raised young John Parker. It is more likely he was raised by John and Katherine Dennis, because he would grow up and marry a girl from Georgeham, and because Dennis is another family name that would soon appear along the banks of the Kennebec River in Maine.

On Sept.7th 1636, John Parker II was head of household in the Winter Harbor book of rates and assessed a tax of 1 pound for support of the minister.

John II appears to have remained in Gorges employ and in 1636 is found managing the fishing station at Winter Harbor. It appears that he will become the district manager, taking over his fathers duties for Gorges network of stations along the Maine coast. There is no concrete evidence for all of this, but the clues when pieced togetger would suggest this chronology. The historian Rev. Henry O. Thayer, wrote a biography of John Parker which can be found in one of his scrapbooks. Thayer recognized that there were 2 adult John Parkers in 1636, but was not aware of their relationship as father and son. He places one at Sagadahoc and the other at Winter Harbor correctly. He fails to see the son moving his family to Arrowsic Island to join his father following Vines departure in 1645.

All their children were born in England so John did not move his family to Winter Harbor until after Mary was born in 1635.

Page 103: Today nothing is known of the day to day life at the Winter Harbor Station during Parker’s presence there, or at any of the other stations scattered along the Maine coast, with the one exception of Richmond Island. From the Trelawney Papers we can catch an intimate glimpse into the lives of a family and their employees on the Maine frontier in the early 17th century.

Page 132: The next record of John II reveals that he had a crew of fishermen stationed at Damariscove on the 20th of May 1645, just 6 mos. before Vines would leave. The elder Parker would have then been 77 yrs., so it would seem likely this was his son, age 44. It appears that John II, as district manager was responsible for numerous stations including Damariscove, but according to those deeds had not moved his family to Damariscove.

Page 135: Massachusetts court records involving John II state on 20th of May 1645, Robert Nash, a coastal trader our of Mass Bay on a voyage downest, stopped in to Strattons Island Plantation. He began selling sack, a white wine imported from the sout of Europe, to the island fishermen. Nash was himself consuming a large quantity and was, according to depositions, soon very drink and giving it away. John Parker II also arrived there about this time with a number of fishermen either to or from Damariscove, and his men quickly joined the islanders in lining up for free drinks, as did Nash’s own crew. From all accounts Parker did not join in, but couldn’t deter his men from getting drunk. Testimony of John Parker II “John Parkar of Damarills Cove affermeth that Robart nash being with him gaue & sould so much sack to his men that nash himself and parkers men were all so drunk for seuarall dais together that his men could not goe to Sea in the prime tyme of fishing whereby the said parkar & his company lost 40 or 50 pownds by the misdemeanors of said nash”

Page 145: John Parker II moved his family from Winter Harbor (Biddeford) to Sagadahoc after 1645 and probably before 1651. He purchased a 100 acre tract at Squirrel Point on Arrowsic Island from John Richards. He made out a will in October 1651, and it appears that both he and his father died between then and 1654.

John Parker, Jr., the younger son of John Sr., lived on Arrowsic and was in the fishing trade until Indian raids drove him to the west bank of the Kennebec. He later returned to Stage (Sagadahoc) Island, where others from Parker’s Island found refuge from King Philip’s depredations. The fort there was evacuated in 1689 and no further attempts were made to settle Parker’s Island and Arrowsic until 1710. At Indian Point (then Sagadahoc Point) there had been an Indian raid in 1662. (A 1748 deed transfers ownership of land on Indian Point out of the Parker family line to George Rogers on the site of the Sadie Drake house on what is now Indian Point Road.)

In 1676 the Clark & Lake Fort on Arrowsic was totally destroyed by fire in a major raid.

Children

2. Thomas Parker

Thomas’ wife Mary Shaw was born 29 Jul 1630 in Cambridge, Mass. Her parents were Roger SHAW and Ann SMYTHE. Mary died in 1673 in Reading, Mass.

Lived and died in Georgetown, ME. Had about 1/3 of the island now known as Georgetown facing the sea.

3. John Parker

John’s wife Margaret Fairfield was born in 1643. Her parents were Daniel Fairfield and [__?__].

Thomas transfered the deed to Parker’s Island (present day Georgetown) to Thomas Salter of Boston in 1731

To all People unto whom this present Deed of Sale shall come John Parker of Boston in the County of Suffolk in New England Shipwright Eldest Son of Thomas Parker late of Raskohegan alias Parkers Island so called Husbandman deceased who was the eldest Son of John Parker heretofore of Biddeford in Great Britain Fisherman deceased sendeth Greeting Know ye that I the 2nd John Parker for & in Consideration of the Sum of Sixty Five Pounds to me in Hand paid at & before the Ensealing & Delivery of these psents by Thomas Salter of Boston aforesd Cordwainer the Receipt of which Sum to full content and satisfaction I do hereby acknowledge and for divers good Causes & Considerations me thereunto moving have given granted, bargained, sold, aliened, enfeoffed, conveyed & confirmed & by these psents do give grant bargain sell convey & confirm unto the said Thomas Salter his Heirs and Assigns forever all my Right Title Interest Property Claim & Demand whatsoever which I now have or at any time hereafter can pretend to have or Claim in Right of my Honoured Father the above named Thomas Parker who was Eldest Son and One of the Heirs of my Grandfather the above named John Parker Deceased or otherwise howsoever of in or to the aforesaid Island called Raskohegon alias Parkers Island

situate lying & being by Sagadahoc River Mouth upon the Eastward Side & lyes away North North East towards Sheepsgut River or however otherwise described & bounded or reputed to be bounded Together with all Isletts, Rivers Ponds Trees Woods Under Woods Ways Waters Water Courses buildings Profitts Priviledges & Appurces to the sd granted Premises belonging or in any Ways appertaining and the Reversion & Reversions Remainder & Remainders thereof All which Island was granted & conveyed by Robert Hood Sagamore of Sagadahoc & Kenebeck by a good Deed bearing Date February Twenty Seventh 1650 made & given to my sd Grandfather John Parker who died seized thereof in fee & upon the Decease of Mary his Wife the same descended to & became the Estate & Inheritance of my Honoured Father Thomas Parker the Eldest Son John Parker & Mary Webber the Three Surviving Children and Heirs of the said John Parker Deceased To have and to hold all my aforesaid Right Title Interest Estate Share Proportion Dividend property Claim or Demand of in or to the aforesaid Island Isletts & Premisses before mentioned with the Appurces unto the sd Thomas Salter his Heirs & Assigns forever to his & their only sole & proper Use benefit & behoof from Hence forth & forevermore freely peaceably & absolutely without any manner of Condition Reversion or limitation of Use or Uses whatsoever so that of & from all reelaim Challenge or Demand to be by me the said John Parker my Heirs or Assigns at any time hereafter had made or elaimed of in or to the said granted pmisses in Right of my sd Father Thomas Parker or otherwise howsoever I & they & each of us and them shall and will be debarred & forever exeluded of & from the same by Force & Virtue of these psents In Witness whereof ‘ I the said John Parker have hereunto put my Hand& Seal this Eighth Day of July Anno Domini One Thousand Seven Hundred & Thirty OneJohn Parker (Seal) Signed Sealed & Delivered in psence of us Stephen Green- leaf Senr John MarshallBook xiv 3,SSuffolk ss/Boston July the 20th 1731 Mr John Parker acknowledged this Instrum1 to be his Act & Deed before me Edwd Hutchinson J : PacisKnow all Men by these psents that I Sarah Wife of the within named John Parker in token of my free consent to ye within Deed of Sale & relinquishment of my Right of Dower or Thirds in the Lands therein granted have hereunto put my Hand & Seal this Eighth Day of July 1731Sarah Parker (Seal)Signed Sealed & Delivered in psence of us Stephen Green- leaf Senr John MarshallSuffolk ss/ Boston July 20th 1731 MTM Sarah Parker personally appeared & acknowledged the fore going Instrument by her Signed to be her Act & Deedbefore me Edwd Hutchinson Just P1

A true Copy of the Original Recd October 7. 1731

Death of John Parker

Memorial Bolume Papham Celebration Aug. 20, 1862 368pgs. Edited by Rev. Edward Ballard

But the ruthless savage soon invaded the peaceful homes of these enterprising frontiersmen, and the torch of barbarian hordes, preceded by the horrors of the tomahawk and scalping knife, forced al to flee. John Parker and son James reached “Casco Bay” (Ancient Aucocisco) now Portland, and were there slain at the taking of the Fort Loyal, May 20, 1690 when Dalmouth was sacked by the French and Indians

The Battle of Fort Loyal (May 20, 1690) involved Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière leading his troops as well as Mi’kmaq and Maliseet from Fort Meductic in New Brunswick to capture and destroy an English settlement on the Falmouth neck (site of present-day Portland, Maine), then part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. After two days of siege, the settlement’s fort, called Fort Loyal (sometimes spelled “Loyall”), surrendered. The community’s buildings were burned, including the wooden stockade fort, and its people were either killed or taken prisoner. With the fall of Fort Loyal (Casco), led to the near depopulation of Maine. Native forces were then able to attack New Hampshire frontier without reprisal.

The earliest garrison at Falmouth was Fort Loyal (1678) in what was then the center of town, the foot of India Street. During King William’s War, on Major Benjamin Church’s first expedition into Acadia, on September 21, 1689, he and 250 troops defended a group of English settlers trying to establish themselves at Falmouth, Maine (present-day Portland, Maine). Natives killed 21 of his men, however, he was successful and the natives retreateed.  Church then returned to Boston leaving the small group of English settlers unprotected. Hertel was chosen by Governor Frontenac to lead an expedition in 1690 that successfully raided Salmon Falls on the Maine-New Hampshire border, and then moved on to destroy Fort Loyal on Falmouth Neck (site of present-day Portland, Maine)

In May 1690, four hundred to five hundred French and Indian troops under the command of Joseph-François Hertel de la Fresnière and St. Castin attacked the settlement. Grossly outnumbered, the settlers held out for four days before surrendering. Eventually two hundred were murdered and left in a large heap a few paces from what is now the popular Benkay sushi restaurant. When a fresh Indian war broke out in 1716, authorities decided to demolish the fort and evacuate the city rather than risk another catastrophe.  When Church returned to the village later that summer, he buried the dead.

4. Mary PARKER (See Thomas WEBBER‘s page)

Sources:

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/6081812/person/901586745

http://genforum.genealogy.com/parker/messages/14628.html

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/l/a/Gina-L-Llamas/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0449.html

http://www.georgetownhistoricalsociety.org/Georgetown%20History%2010-07.html

http://andreabrand.com/sebasco/history.htm

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This entry was posted in 12th Generation, Immigrant - England, Line - Shaw, Place Names, Violent Death and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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