Samuel Senton Patterson Sr.

Samuel Senton PATTERSON Sr. (c. 1725 – 1791) was Alex’s 6th Great Grandfather, one of 128 in this generation of the Miner line.

Samuel Patterson – 350 acres Dist of Ninety Six

Samuel Patterson Sr. was born about 1725 in Dysart, Newry, County Down, Ireland. His father may have been James PATTERSON.   He married Mary CARSON about 1755  in Newry, County Down, Ireland.   Samuel, Mary and their first six children were part of a large group of Presbyterians who followed an emigration led by the Reverend William Martin in 1772.   The Pattersons sailed on The Freemason departing from Newry on 27 Oct 1772  and arrived in Charleston on 22 Dec 1772.  Samuel received a land grant of 350 acres in Abbeville District, South Carolina, 100 acres for himself and 50 acres for each child under 16.  His eldest daughter Mary received 100 acres.   Samuel died about 1791 in Abbeville District, South Carolina.

Samuel Patterson – Mary’s 100 arces – Dist of ninety six

Mary Carson was born in Newry, County Down, Ireland abt 1730.  Her parents were Thomas Gibson CARSON  and  Margaret  McDOWELL.   Alternatively, her parents were  William CARSON and Margaret [__?__].

One source says the Carson name probably comes from two Patterson brothers, Samuel and James that arrived from Ireland in 1773.  Samuel was married to Mary Carson and James also may have been married to a Carson.   Mary died in 1820 in Abbeville District, SC, at 90 years of age.

Children of Samuel and Mary:

Name Born Married Departed
1. Mary Patterson 4 Jul 1757 Newry, County Down, Ireland William McGaw
5 Oct 1775 Abbeville, District 96, South Carolina
4 Apr 1842 Israel Township, Preble Co, OH
2. Sarah Patterson c. 1759
Newry, Ireland
John McGaw
c. 1777
Abbeville District SC
Nov 1820 Abbeville District, SC
3. John Patterson Jan 1763
County Down, Ireland
Mary Carson (his 1st cousin)
1792 Abbeville, SC
11 Nov 1837
Preble Co, OH Interred Hopewell Cemetery
4. Samuel PATTERSON Jr. 17 Oct 1765 County Down, Ireland. Agnes [__?__]
Abbeville District, South Carolina
before 1792
.
Rosannah Sprowl
28 Dec 1814 Preble County, Ohio
20 Dec 1833 in Preble Co, OH
5. James Patterson 1767
County Down, Ireland
Nancy Smith (Smyth) aft 1830 in Dixon Twsp, Preble Co, OH
6. Jane Patterson 9 Oct 1769 Newry, County Down, Ireland David Pressly
McCormick Co, SC
25 Feb 1856 Pittsburgh, Allegheny Co, PA
7. Josiah Patterson Nov 1774
Abbeville District, SC
Abigail Blair
6 Feb 1794 Abbeville District, SC
.
Mrs. Sarah Terry
16 Sep 1824 Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina
.
Eleanor Phelps
27 Nov 1832 Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina
31 Oct 1846 in Abbeville District, SC
8. Margaret (Peggy) Patterson 1775 John Pressley
15 Nov 1798 Abbeville, Abbeville, SC

Samuel is named as a Ruling Elder in the church in his daughter Jane’s obituary. Perhaps, the Cedar Springs ARP (Associate Reformed Presbyterian) Church in Abbeville Dist of South Carolina where Rev. Alexander Porter was the pastor.

Several Presbyterian pastors led their congregations in emigrations from Ulster to America in the decade following Rev. Dr. Thomas Clark’s emigration from Ballybay, Northern Ireland to New York Colony in 1764. The most notable of these was the Martin emigration of Covenanter Presbyterian in 1772 from the area of Kellswater in central County Antrim, now part of Northern Ireland.

In 1750 Presbyterians from Octoraro, Virginia, and North Carolina, came to South Carolina and settled at Rocky Creek. By 1755 Irish immigrants, many of them Covenanters, began arriving. Various groups (Associate, Covenanter, Burgher, Anti-Burgher, Seceders) formed the “Catholic” (meaning a union of various groups of Presbyterians) church on Rocky Mount Road, 15 miles southeast of Chester. In 1770 Covenanters began holding society meetings and wrote to Ireland for a minister. Reverend William Martin answered the call in 1772.

The Rev. William Martin was the only Covenanter minister in counties Down and Antrim at that time. In 1760 he resided at Kellswater, in the townland of Carnaghts in the Parish of Connor. He had oversight responsibility for societies at Cullybackey, Laymore, Cloughmills, and Dervock. He preached also in Londonderry and Donegal. The Presbytery was founded in 1743 and Kellswater became the center in 1760.

There were five ships in the emigration led by Reverend Martin, all of which sailed in 1772.  The first two sailed from Larne, the next two from Belfast, and the last one from Newry.   The emigrants settled throughout western South Carolina, many in the Abbeville area.  Reverend Martin himself settled in the general area of Abbeville, South Carolina (Rocky Creek in Chester County).  After the British burned his church in 1780, he took refuge in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.

The James and Mary sailed first on August 25 from Larne. There was smallpox on board (five children died) when they arrived in Charleston harbor on October 16.  They were required to remain on board in quarantine, lying off Sullivan’s Island for over seven weeks, until the first part of December. “Ulster Emigration to Colonial America: 1718-1775″, page 253 by Dickson. “English America: American Plantations & Colonies”, by Thomas Langford, contains ship lists of voyages to English America from 1500 to 1825. See also “The Vessels, Voyages, Settlements, and People of English America 1500 – 1825″.

The next ship to sail was the Lord Dunluce that left Larne on October 4 and arrived in Charleston on December 20. This is the only ship that listed “Rev. Wm. Martin (Kellswater)” as an agent. The original sailing date was to have been Aug 15. The sailing was delayed until Aug 20, and then rescheduled for Sep 22. On Aug 28, the ship announced that passengers must give earnest money by Sep 5 since a greater number had offered to go than could betaken. On Sep 15, the ship advertised that, since some families had drawn back, two hundred more passengers could be accommodated. Reverend Martin was on this ship when it finally sailed on Oct 4. One man and several children died of small pox on the trip.

The Pennsylvania Farmer, whose destination had originally been advertised as Philadelphia, sailed from Belfast on Oct 16 and arrived in Charleston on December 19. (Dickson, page 248).   Aboard the Pennsylvania Farmer was Andrew Paterson (250 acres).

The Hopewell sailed from Belfast on October 19 and arrived in Charleston on December 23. (Dickson, page 248).   There were five Patersons aboard the Hopewell: Agnes (350 acres), Janet (100 acres), John (250 acres), John (100 acres), William (350 acres).

The Freemason sailed from Newry on October 27 and arrived in Charleston on December 22 (Dickson, page 252). Aboard the FreeMason were: Samuel Patterson (350 acres) and Mary Patterson (100 –  unable to pay). According to Council Journal 37, Province of South Carolina, under date of 6 Jan 1773, the brigantine Free Mason, out of Ireland (port not specified), discharged at Charles Town, South Carolina, the following among its Irish Protestant immigrant passengers who were authorized the amount of land, in South Carolina, indicated opposite their names:

In the Province of South Carolina in 1773, land was granted under the Crown, as follows: Single man or woman (16 yrs. of age or older) – 100 acres Married man or widow – 100 acres for self and 50 acres for each child under 16 years Married woman – none Samuel Paterson named above would have had five children under 16 years of age on his arrival.  Mary Patterson, referred to above, was 16 years of age or older and was single (or a widow with no eligible children).  Prior to this time, the “Bounty Act” had expired and no bounty could be paid to the individuals. There was, therefore, no list of the passengers for the purpose of determining “family rights”. Family members and other individual passengers who were not eligible (e.g., under 15) to petition for free land (still available under the eighth clause of the General Duty Act of June 14, 1751) are not listed. See “The Five Ships and the People who came with the Rev. Martin”. The names of the emigrants have been reconstructed from letters written home to Ulster and published in the paper and from extractions of the South Carolina Quarter Session Minutes, by Janie Revill and Jean Stephenson.

Samuel Patterson’s 350 acres were surveyed on 12 Feb 1773, and was in Hillsborough Township, 96th District, bordered by land of Nick’es Bonchillon, Jean Bellats, Jacob Delchaux, Mary Patterson, James Clark, and Pat Calhoun.

Mary Patterson was granted 100 acres in Hillsborough township, 96th District, bordered Jacob De Le Chaux, Samuel Patterson, Jean Bellat; surveyed 12 Feb 1773.

Ninety-Six District was the former western most judicial district in the U.S. state of South Carolina. It existed as a district from 29 July 1769 to 31 December 1799. The court house and jail for Ninety-Six District were in Ninety Six, South Carolina.

In the colonial period, the land around the coast was divided into parishes corresponding to the parishes of the Church of England. There were also several counties that had judicial and electoral functions. As people settled the backcountry, judicial districts and additional counties were formed.   On 1 January 1800, Ninety-Six District was abolished and replaced by the AbbevilleEdgefieldGreenvilleLaurens, and Newberry Districts.

The Pattersons’ land grants were in present day Abbeville County.

Abbeville County, South Carolina
Map of South Carolina highlighting Abbeville County

Samuel Patterson’s will was dated March 3, 1791 in Abbeville Dist, Rec September 13, 1794. Exrs: Wm. & John McGaw [both his sons-in-law]. Wit: Thos. Clark, Wm Carson [his wife’s brother], Alexr. Patterson [b. 1751 County Down, Ireland – d. 8 Jun 1839 in Abbeville County, South Carolina; m. Catherine McCaleb (1755 – 1839) I don’t know how Alexander is related ]. Wife: Mary Patterson. Chn: Saml., Josiah, Jas., Margaret, John, Mary, Sarah, Jean Patterson.  Will was probated 13 Sep 1794.

Samuel Patterson Will 1791

Children 

1. Mary Patterson

Mary’s husband  William McGaw was born 8 Feb 1749/50 in Dunfermline, County Antrim, Ireland. His father was John McGaw.   He emigrated to Abbeville District, S.C. from Ireland at the age of 17 about 1767 with his brother John.  They married sisters Mary and Sarah Patterson, daughters of Samuel Patterson. He was elder in Cedar Springs Association Reformed Presbyterian Church in Abbeville and elected ruling elder in the Hopewell Congregation in Preble Co, OH.  William died 31 May 1836 in Preble County, Ohio and is buried next to Mary.

William served in the Revolutionary War in the 58th South Carolina Troops Militia / Ninety-Six District Regiment from fall or early winter of 1775. He began as a private and was promoted to Captain within a year to 18 months of the unit known as John Anderson’s Company. He retained this command until the close of the war.  A Private and a Captain under Maj. Andrew Williamson, [later Brigadier General], Col. Andrew Pickens (wiki) [later Brigadier General , Major General and Congressman] . Later, a Captain under Col. Robert Anderson (wiki)  (Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment).

Engagements

Florida Expedition 1778 -

Battle of Kettle Creek (GA), -

Battle of Stono Ferry -

William, his wife Mary, and family emigrated to Preble County, Ohio from South Carolina with Mary’s parents in 1811 where he became a Ruling Elder in the congregation of Hopewell Church. William resided 1811-1836 in Israel Twsp (Section 5), Preble Co, OH.

Mary Patterson McGaw Headstone — Hopewell Cemetery, Morning Sun, Preble County, Ohio

Children of William and Mary

i. Agnes McGaw b. 27 Jun 1776 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina; d. Nov 1845; m. 1794 in Abbeville, SC to Alexander Clark (b. 1772 in Abbeville, SC – d. 7 Jan 1841 in Perry, Illinois)

ii. Mary McGaw b. 15 Feb 1778 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. 10 Aug 1820 Israel, Preble, Ohio; m. 1796 in Abbeville, SC to James Boyse (b. 1768 in Long Cain Settlement, Abeville, SC – d. 22 Sep 1842 in Israel Township, Preble, Ohio)  His parents were David Boyse and Jane Archer.

iii. Jane McGaw b. 3 Apr 1780; d. 10 Aug 1820 or 1825 – Israel, Preble County, Ohio; m.  18 Jan 1803 – Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina to Robert Boyse (b. 22 Aug 1776  in a Fort, in So Carolina   – d. 13 Jan 1847 in Israel Township, Preble County, Ohio.)  His parents were also David Boyse and Jane Archer.

Moved to Preble County Ohio after 1807. Their son Rev. William McGaw Boyse ( b. 24 Dec 1806 in Long Cane Settle, Abbeville, South Carolina – d. 861 in Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa.) was a Minister in Richmond Indiana, 1833-1853.

iv. Elizabeth McGaw b. 26 Sep 1782 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC

v. Sarah McGaw b. 12 Mar 1788 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. 1 Nov 1847 Preble, Ohio

Never married. Mentioned in father’s will, but not in mother’s, so was probably dead at time. Signed her will 19 May 1817; probated 4 Dec 1820

vi. Margaret McGaw b. 4 Jul 1790 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. 21 Feb 1838, Hopewell Cemetery, Morning Sun, Preble County, Ohio; m. 2 Nov 1815 in Preble, Ohio to Thomas Pinkerton (b. 9 Nov 1793 in Abbeville, SC – d. 22 Mar 1873 in Preble, Ohio)  His parents were John Pinkerton (1768 – 1852) and  Mary Anderson (1768 – 1837).; After Margaret died, Thomas married Margaret Sloan (b. 1796 South Carolina – d. 13 Jun 1872 Preble, Ohio)

Thomas emigrated with other colonists and his father’s family of 8 sons and 2 daughters to Preble in the spring of 1815. Married Margaret McGaw November 2, 1815 and built a cabin in Dixon township. After Margaret died, in 1839 he married Margaret Sloan. His father Hon. John Pinkerton, often a commissioner of Preble county, member of the State Legislature, who with many of the early settlers of Israel and Dixon townships, in Preble left South Carolina because of the slavery issue.

History of Preble County, Ohio 1881 — Thomas Pinkerton came to Dixon in 1815, with his father, John Pinkerton, who entered land in section thirty-two. John Pinkerton subsequently represented Preble county in the State legislature two terms. Thomas was born in South Carolina in 1793, and married, in 1816, Margaret McGaw, by whom he had seven children two of whom survive: Elizabeth, wife of John B. Foster, living in Illinois, and W. A. Pinkerton, in this township. W. A. was born in 1821, married, in 1842, Maria Sterrett, who was born in 1821. They have had four children, two living. Mr. Pinkerton has held the office of justice of the peace six years, and has been trustee of the township some fifteen years.

In the 1850 census, Thomas and Margaret were farming in Dixon, Preble, Ohio.

The Fair Haven Church — As soon as that portion of the Hopewell congregation living in the vicinity of Fair Haven had been stricken off , the petition to moderate a call had been granted by presbytery. A call was made out and moderated by Rev. Alexander Porter, and accepted by Rev. Jeremiah Morrow, son of ex-Governor Morrow. He was installed in the following spring. The congregation consisted of about fifty families, and the new church immediately commenced its career of prosperity. The following were the first elders of the church. John and Thomas Pinkerton, John Foster, William McGaw and William McCaw [son of James McCAW and uncle of William A McCAW who probably followed his relative to Preble, Ohio.

vii. Rev. Samuel Patterson McGaw b. 3 Jun 1793 in Winnsboro, Fairfield, SC; d. 18 Mar 1840 Monroe, Butler, Ohio; m. 18 Aug 1818 in Warren, Ohio to Anna Gordon (b. 1 Jan 1796 in Fayette, Kentucky – d. 1 Aug 1875 in Oxford, Butler, Ohio)

Presbyterian Minister- Pastor of Clear Creek and Mt. Pleasant Congregations in Ohio. Known to have had eight children, one known is Anna Maria b. 3 Apr 1820, d. 1 Jul 1865,

In the 1860 and 1870 census, Anna was living in Oxford, Butler, Ohio with her daughters Lizzie (b. 1835 Ohio) and Harriet (b. 1840 Ohio)

Rev Samuel P Magaw and Anna Gordon Gravestone — Springboro Cemetery, Springboro, Warren, OH

viii. Martha McGaw b. 9 Oct 1795 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. 1881; m. 1813 in Preble, Ohio to Samuel Smith (b. 1795 Kentucky – d. 1881) His parents were our ancestors  James SMITH and Anna SMITH

In the 1850 census, Samuel and Martha were farming in Israel, Preble, Ohio.

ix. Abigail McGaw b. 9 Mar 1798 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. Burial: Hopewell Cemetery, Morning Sun, Preble County, Ohio, Plot: Row 19; m. 11 Jun 1817 in Preble, Ohio to William Pinkerton (b. Oct 1795 in Abbeville, South Carolina – d. 19 Nov 1848 in Preble, Ohio); .

William Pinkerton and Thomas Pinkerton were brothers.

In the 1860 census, Abigail was living with her son Joseph in Israel, Preble, Ohio.

x. William Magaw Jr. b. 16 Nov 1801 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. 24 Mar 1897 Preble, Ohio; m1. 11 Mar 1824 Preble, Ohio to Rachel Paxton (b. 29 Sep 1805 in Preble, Ohio – d. 18 Feb 1852 in Preble, Ohio); m2. 27 Mar 1856 in Kenton, Hardin, Ohio to Elizabeth Lang (b. 30 Oct 1820 in Ohio – d. 12 Mar 1913 in Richmond, Indiana);

In the 1860 census, William and Elizabeth Magaw were farming in Israel, Preble, Ohio.

He has numerous descendents, 10 children by first wife, and 2 by second wife, — all of whom spell the name “Magaw”.

2. Sarah Patteson 

Sarah’s husband  John McGaw was born about 1757 in Dunfermline, County Antrim, Ireland.  He and his brother William, sons of John, came from Ireland about 1767. They married sisters Mary and Sarah Patterson, daughters of Samuel Patterson. John died in 1805 in Abbeville District, SC. John signed his will 15 Feb 1805, recorded 06 Aug 1805, and probated 04 Dec 1805.

John McGaw was a captain in the Revolutionary War.
Regiment – Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment
Service – 1779 to 1783
Unit – A Lieutenant and a Captain under Col. Andrew Pickens and Col. Robert Anderson before and after the Fall of Charleston.

Engagements – Siege of Ninety-Six 1781, Indian Villages

Sarah made a will 19 May 1817. The will was proven 04 Dec 1820. Her will was dated 19 May 1817 in Abbeville Dist, and proven 04 Dec 1820. Exrs; Son, Samuel McGaw, Bro., Josiah Patterson. Wit: Samuel, John T. Pressly. Chn: John, Samuel, Wm., Jad., Moses, Agness, Benjamin, Josiah, Mary McGaw Sale, Dec. 22, 1820. Byrs: Mary Giles, Allen Glover, Benjamin McGaw, Josiah McGaw, Jane Pressly, James Patton, Samuel McGaw, Josiah Patterson, John Pressly, Mathew Shanks, Robert Shanks, Archibald Little.

Children of Sarah and John:

i. John McGaw b. 1778 in Abbeville, SC; d. 1846 Illinois; m. 11 Dec 1799 in Abbeville, SC to Agnes Cochran (b. 1780 in Abbeville, SC – d. 1838 in Abbeville)

ii. Samuel McGaw b. 20 Sep 1780 in Abbeville, SC; d. 2 Oct 1825 Abbeville, SC; m. 15 Feb 1801 in Abbeville, SC to Mary (Mollie) Anderson (b. 1782 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC – d. 26 May 1836 in Abbeville)

Samuel and Mary had eleven children, most of whom lived their whole lives in Abbeville.

iii. William McGaw b. 1782 in Abbeville, SC; d. Aft 1860 cenus; m. 1813 in Abbeville, SC to Hannah English (b. 1785 in Abbeville, SC -d. Aft. 1860 census) Her parents were Andrew English and Elizabeth Jane Bryson.  Lived in Marengo Co., Alabama.   In the 1860 census, William and Hannah lived in Township 12 Range 3 East, Marengo, Alabama with Etheldred W and Salina (perhaps Dorothy “Dolly” Patterson)  Quinney.

iv. James McGaw b. 1784 in Abbeville, SC; m. Eleanor [__?__]; d. 1820 Marengo, Alabama. Probably went to Marengo Co., Alabama.  Family history says he died in 1820, and also that he might have removed to above in the 1820’s.

v. Mary Agnes McGaw b. 15 Aug 1786 in Abbeville, SC; d.  1845 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina.; m1. Abt. 1803, Abbeville, 96 District, SC. Robert Giles (b. 1786 in Elbert, Georgia – d.  27 Mar 1817 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina);  His mother may have been Susannah Patterson (b.  1744 in Belfast, Antrim, , Ireland – d. 8 Mar 1824 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina.) I haven’f found what the relation may have been.

m2.  1822 Abbeville, SC to Mathew Brown (b. 1771 Ireland – d. Apr 1845 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina)  Matthew first married Martha “Mattie” Creswell (1779 – 1820)

vi. Sarah (Sally) McGaw b. 1788 in Abbeville, SC; d. 1817 Abbeville, SC or 1 Jan 1847 – Preble County, Ohio; m. [__?__] Patterson

vii. Moses McGaw b. 1790 in Abbeville, SC; d. 10 May 1868 South Henderson Cemetery , Gladstone, Henderson County, Illinois;   m. 14 Dec 1815 in Preble, Ohio to Isabelle Wiley (b. 1797 in Kentucky – d.  23 Jan 1880, Henderson, Illinois)

In the 1850 census, Moses and Isabelle were farming in Dixon, Preble, Ohio.

viii. Benjamin McGaw b. 2 Oct 1794 in Abbeville, SC; d. 22 Oct 1849 Columbia, Maury, Tennessee; m. 1816 in Abbeville, SC to Jane Cochran (b. 9 Oct 1798 in SC – d. 22 Nov 1846 in Maury, Tennessee)

Moved From Abbevile SC area to Maury Co., TN, about 1824-29.

Captain, Long Cane Republican Troop of Cavalry, SC Militia (commision dated 7 May, 1824)

ix. Josiah McGaw b. 10 Nov 1796 in Abbeville, SC; d. 4 Aug 1851 Holly Springs, Marshall, Mississippi; m1. 30 Mar 1820 in Abbeville, SC to Martha Russell (b. 1800 – d. 1836 in Abbeville, SC); m2. 19 Jan 1837 in Abbeville, SC to Martha Devlin (b. 1800 in Greenwood, SC – d. 1877 in Abbeville, Laurens, SC) Widow of [__?__] Pressly

In the 1850 census, Josiah owned 16 slaves in  Lexington, Holmes, Mississippi.

Age Gender
35 Male
28 Male
13 Male
7 Male
3 Male
46 Female
25 Female
25 Female
6 Female
4 Female
3 Female
2 Female
2 Female
3 Female
1 Female
2 M Female.

3. John Patterson

John’s wife Mary Carson was born 1764 in Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland.  She was his first cousin.  Her parents were William A. Carson and Margaret Mills.  Her grandparents were Thomas Gibson CARSON and Margaret McDOWELL.  Mary died 29 May 1824 at 59 years of age. Her body was interred 1824 in Hopewell Cem, Preble Co, OH.

John and wife removed from Abbeville District, S.C. to Preble County, OH in 1807. Apparently had no children as none mentioned in estate papers – estate sold 13 Apr 1838 in Preble County, OH. Administrator of his estate was Thomas Pinkerton, bond signed by Pinkerton, Alexander Porter and William McGaw.

John was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, serving as a substitute for his father in August 1778 when he was just 15 1/2 years old; he saw service in the Carolinas in 1778, 1780 and 1781 and was discharged March 1781. He was in both the infantry and cavalry.

John applied for a Revolutionary War Pension on Sep 18, 1832.  We know a lot about his service from his application letter.

In August 1778 John was assigned to Captain John Cowan’s  (Cowen’s) Company of militia, Colonel George Reed’s Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment and General Andrew Williamson’s Brigade. The force rendezvoused at Beaverdam Creek in Georgia. John served for three months during which time he was engaged in defending the country against the Cherokee by burning the Indian’s corn and destroying seven Indian towns.  His discharge was signed by Lt. Davis.

In April 1780, John was drafted to go to Charleston under Captain Cowan who then belonged to Colonel Pickens’ regiment. When this draft had proceeded about eighty miles on the way to Charleston, they were met by an express informing them the city had surrendered.  Col. Pickens then  marched his men to Camden.  John was out on tour about one month.

In September 1780, John went to Soap Creek, Georgia and volunteered to serve in Capt. Dunn’s Company in Col. Clarke’s Regiment.  He was with Col. Clark when he took possession of Augusta, but was soon driven away by the British.  He continued in service on this tour — after the Battle of King’s Mountain which was on the 7th of October.  After this battle, the company under Capt. Dunn dispersed being all volunteers for no definite time.

John, with three others, went to Mecklenburg County, North Carolina and remained with his friends until January 1781.

When Lord Cornwallis commenced his march to Virginia, John volunteered to service in a light horse company for six weeks under Capt. Givens? and Col. Harris?.  John was engaged in guarding the fords on the Catuwba River about one week.  He was then marched to Guilford Court House. Near Guilford, his company joined forces with General Greene.  During this tour, John was engaged in several skirmishes with the British, but was in no general engagement.  At the end of the six week volunteer, John received a discharge from Capt. Givens?

The Battle of Guilford Court House,  fought on March 15, 1781 in Greensboro, the county seat of Guilford County, North Carolina.   A force of 1,900 British troops under the command of Lieutenant General Charles Cornwallis defeated an American force of 4,000 troops, commanded by Major General Nathanael Greene.

Despite the relatively small numbers of troops involved, the battle is considered pivotal to the American victory in the Revolution. Before the battle, the British appeared to have had great success in conquering much of Georgia and South Carolina with the aid of strong Loyalist factions, and thought that North Carolina might be within their grasp. In the wake of the battle, Greene moved into South Carolina, while Cornwallis chose to march into Virginia and attempt to link up with roughly 3500 men under British Major General Phillips and American turncoat Benedict Arnold. These decisions allowed Greene to unravel British control of the South, while leading Cornwallis to Yorktown and eventual surrender to Major General George Washingtonand Lieutenant General Comte de Rochambeau.

In the summer of 1781, John enlisted in the troop of Capt. Francis Moore’s company of light horse, Colonel, Col. Charles Myddleton’s SC 2nd Regiment of State Dragoons.  In March 1782, John’s  ten month enlistment expired and he was discharged by Capt. Moore at Orangeburg   Engagements included:

May 1, 1781  Friday’s Ferry
May 11,1781  Orangeburgh
Jun 18, 1781  Myddleton’s Ambuscade
Jul 17, 1781  Quinby’s Bridge
Jul 17, 1781  Shubrick’s Plantation
Sep 8, 1781  Eutaw Springs,

“History of Preble County, Ohio” published in 1881:

THE HOPEWELL CHURCH. In the years 1806 and 1807 several families, members of the Associate Reformed church, emigrated from the States of Kentucky and South Carolina, and settled in Israel Township in the midst of the Beech Woods. Rev. Risk, a minister of the Associate Reformed church, preached to them soon after their settlement.

In the fall of 1808, at the house of William McCreary, in section thirty-six, they formed themselves into a society, and in conjunction with the people of Concord petitioned the presbytery of Kentucky for supplies. Among those who occasionally supplied them were, Revs. McCord, McGill, Samuel Crothers and Brahman Craig.

September, 1808, the people assembled in the double log barn of David Madill’s, and Mr. Craig, after preaching organized the congregation into a church of nearly fifty members. Prominent among these first named on the church roll were the McDills, McQuistons, Boyces, Ramseys and Elliotts. At the time of the organization the following elders were chosen by the congregation: David and Andrew McQuiston, James Boyse, Ebenezer Elliott and John Patterson, all of whom had been ordained previous to their settlement in the township.

The church continued to receive supplies from the Kentucky presbytery, and the number of members was increased by immigration, but the prospect of having a settled minister among them did not open until 1814, when Rev. Alexander Porter, the pastor of the Associate Reformed church at Cedar Springs, Abbeville district, South Carolina, being previously released from his charge, came on a visit to the western churches, and to the Israel township congregation preached on two Sabbaths and one week day. By this time the congregation had increased to more than fifty families, and the people were more than ever desirous of securing a pastor and of erecting a house of worship. Accordingly they drew up a call for Mr. Porter, and presented it to the presbytery of Kentucky. A copy of the call is now in possession of the Hopewell session. It is drawn up in the usual form, and prays that Mr. Porter become the shepherd of their souls, and promises to pay him all due respect and support. It was signed by the following persons who constituted the first membership of the church, with the understanding that as soon as these churches could be provided with a settled pastor, Hopewell would receive the whole of Mr. Porters labors.

Prior to this call the first church building had been erected just west of the present house. It was a log structure thirty feet square, and afterwards, to accommodate the growing congregation, received in addition of thirty feet. The pulpit was in the middle of the west side, with two small windows just back of it. The seats were made of slabs hewed from logs. They were provided with stiff, upright backs. The present[1881] church building is a commodious frame, and is kept in good repair.

In October, 1814, Mr. Porter, having accepted the call, came to his new pastoral charge at Hopewell, and settled with his family on the farm in section sixteen, now occupied by Alexander Orr. In the following July he was solemnly installed by Rev. John Steele. Shortly afterwards the congregation was much enlarged by immigrations from Mr. Porter’s old parish, in South Carolina, and six members were added to the session who had been elders of the church in South Carolina.

No children mentioned in estate papers; estate sold 13 April 1838. Administrator of his estate was Thomas Pinkerton, bond signed by Pinkerton, Alexander Porter and William McGaw

John Patterson Headstone — Hopewell Cemetery , Morning Sun, Preble County, Ohio, Plot: Row 25.

TO the memory of
John Patterson
who died
Nov. 11th, 1837
in the 75th year
of his age

4Samuel PATTERSON Jr. (See his page)

5. James Patteson

James’ wife Nancy Smith (Smyth) was born in 1770 in South Carolina. Her parents were Robert Smyth and  Martha Boggs.  Nancy died  in 1850 – Dawson, Georgia

James removed from Abbeville District, S.C. to Preble County, OH. He may have moved there with his brother Samuel. It is believed that the James Patterson listed as a resident of Dixon Twp, Preble County, OH in the U.S. Census of 1830 as 60 to 70 years of age and living alone, is one and the same as James Patterson, son of Samuel Patterson. James is NOT listed in the U.S. Censuses of 1820 and 1840 for Dixon Twp, Preble County, OH.

Children of James and Nancy

i. Samuel Patterson b. 1794 in Abbeville, South Carolina; d. 01 Jan 1872 in Preble, Ohio; DID NOT marry  Mary Ann McJimsey (b. 4 Jul 1812 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania – d. 16 Jul 1849 in Donegal Twsp., Lancaster, Pennsylvania)  She married
Samuel Smith Patterson (b. 29 Apr 1804 in Lancaster Co., PA – d. 11 Jan 1883 in Sterling, Whiteside, Illinois)

ii. William Patterson b. 1798 in Abbeville, South Carolina; d. 16 Apr 1895 in Forsyth, Georgia; Burial: Chestatee Baptist Church Cemetery, Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia; m. 3 Aug 1820 Preble, Ohio to Martha A. Welch ( abt 1800 in Pendleton, South Carolina – d. 11 Dec 1891 in Forsyth, Georgia) William and Martha were farming in Forsyth, Georgia in the 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 census.

William Patterson Bio

iii. Mary Patterson b. ABT 1808 in Abbeville, South Carolina; m. 21 Sep 1826 Preble, Ohio to James Crason

6. Jane Patterson

When Jane was two, her family emigrated to America along with Rev. William Martin, arriving in Charleston, South Carolina in December 1772. Jane’s parents were granted 450 acres in Hillsborough Township, in the Ninty-six District of the back country of South Carolina. Here Jane and her parents became active members of both Long Cane and Cedar Springs A.R.P. churches.

Jane’s husband David Pressly was born 1756 Charleston, South Carolina. His brother John married Jane’s sister Peggy. His parents were John Pressly (b. in Scotland – d. 1778 South Carolina) and Isabelle Fleming (b. 1716 – d. 1761) .   His parents were both Scotch-Irish Presbyterians who emigrated to America, part of Rev. William Martin and his five ships that arrived in Charlestown in the fall of 1772 and settling in the area around Long Cane in Abbeville District, South Carolina. He married Jane Patterson in 1789 in Long Canes, Greenwood, South Carolina. David died in 1818 in Long Canes, Greenwood, South Carolina.

David’s sister Jane Pressly (b. 1762 in Abbeville, South Carolina – d. 28 Jan 1823 in Abbeville, South Carolina) married George Hearst (b. 1764 in Ireland – d. 1822 in Franklin, Missouri) George came to the Abbeville district of South Carolina with his parents in 1766. According to probate records, George Hearst married an unknown Pressly prior to 1807 (the first name of Jane is unproven at this point). The George of this marriage may have been the son of Major John Hearst and Martha Carson (Martha was the granddaughter of our ancestor Thomas Gibson CARSON. Alternatively, George was Major John Hearst’s brother and the son of John Hearst and Elizabeth Knox.

Alternatively yet again, David’s sister Jane married George’s brother Joseph  Hearst (b. 16 Feb. 16, 1760 – d. 21 May 1814 Cedar Springs, Abbeville County, South Carolina) At the age of 21, on June 8th 1784. The Hearst came to South Carolina from Ireland in late 1765 or early 1766 with Dr. Thomas Clark and settled in the Long cane area, as well. Jane and Joseph had known each other as children, both members of Long cane and Cedar Springs A. R. P. churches. This blessed union had six known children. Joseph Hearst, Sr. was ordained as an elder in both Long Cane & Cedar Springs A. R. P. churches, which his parents helped organize. Joseph is buried near his parents and in-laws in the churchyard cemetery at Cedar Springs. His wife would join him fourteen years later. Jane Pressly Hearst departed this life on the 6th of September 1828, at the aged of 66 years old. Jane is buried near her husband and brother, David Pressly in the churchyard cemetery at Cedar Springs.

In circa 1808, George and his family left South Carolina for Illinois. George’s son Joseph stated in the 1850 census that he was born in Illinois. After a few years, the George once again moved, this time to Missouri were he settled in the Meramec valley near his brother Thomas who had preceded him there. It appears that he married again around 1820. By the time of his death, George had become one of the wealthiest man in Meramec township. He kept 19 of the 41 slaves to be found in the township.

George’s son William G Hearst ( b. 1776 Woodvine, Abbeville, South Carolina – d. Nov 1844 Franklin, Missouri) m. 1817 in Biglow, Franklin, Missouri to Elizabeth Collins (b. 1780)

George’s grandson George F Hearst (3 Sep 1820 Anaconda, Franklin, Missouri – d. 28 Feb 1891 California; m. 15 Jun 1862 in Steelville, Crawford, Missouri to Phoebe Elizabeth Apperson (b. 3 Dec 1842 in Whitmire Settlem, Franklin, Missouri – d. 1919 in Colma, California) I attended Phoebe Heart Elementary School in San Diego, named because Phoebe helped found the California PTA.

The Hearst fortune is due to more to luck than skill. George left for California on or about 15 May 1850 taking five months to make the journey. While in California, a few creditors took advantage of George’s absence and brought attachments against land he owned that was in Dr. Patton’s care. When Dr. Patton failed to satisfy the demands, the Hearst lands in his control were sold on the court house steps.

George didn’t make his fortune in the California mines. He was keeping a store when, in 1859, the Comstock Lode was discovered in Nevada. George joined the rush there and invested in the Ophir mine. When Alva Gould sold his claim to George Hearst for $450, he ran down the street yelling “I tricked a Californian”. After digging for only two months, George and his partners hauled 38 tons of high grade ore to California and made a profit of $90,000 from its sale. In less than a year he sold his share in the mine for a fortune. At one time the Ophir mine, which was almost a quarter mile in length was worth $4,000 per foot.

I found Phoebe Apperson Hearst’s portrait in the school auditorium a little scary. This isn’t it, but its close

George F Hearst’s only son William Randolph Hearst (b. 29 Apr 1863 San Francisco, California – d. 14 Aug 1951 Beverly Hills, California) m. Millicent Veronica Willson (1882–1974) Marion Davies, mistress built a newspaper empire and Hearst Castle of course.

David’s family were also charter members of Long Cane and Cedar Springs, thus they had much in common. During their marriage of 28 years, they had nine children; two of her sons were physicians and two were renowned ministers of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church.

Jane left Preble Co, OH with her husband  and returned to Long Canes, Greenwood Co, SC where David Pressley died.  After her husband died in 1818, Jane Pressly lived with her second son, Rev. John T. Pressly, then minister at Cedar Springs. In 1832 when he was appointed minister of the First A.R.P. Church of Allegheny in Pittsburgh, Jane moved with him.

Jane Patterson Pressly died in Pittsburgh on the 25th of February 1856 in the 87th year of her age. She was laid to rest in the Pressly Family plot near her son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren.

Jane’s husband David Pressly was born 1756. His parents were John Pressly and Isabella Fleming b: 1716. His father was a member of the colony that left Belfast, Ireland, now Northern Ireland, 28 Sep 1734 on the Good Intent and arrived at Charles Town, South Carolina about 1 Dec 1734. David died 24 Sep 1818 Troy (Long Canes), Greenwood County

South Carolina at 62 years of age.

David Pressly Gravestone — Cedar Springs A.R.P. Church Cemetery , Cedar Springs, Abbeville County, South Carolina

Inscription:
~~~
SACRED
Memory
of
David Pressly
who departed this life
21st September 1818
aged 62 years
—-•—-
Eminently distinguished
as the
friend of the poor.
—-•—-
Blessed is he that considers
the poor; the Lord will deliver
him in time of trouble. Ps. 11.1

David Pressly, son of the pioneer, John, built a home about five miles east of Long Cane A.R.P. Church and became a prosperous merchant. He is buried in Cedar Springs churchyard, and his tombstone bears the inscription: “To the memory of David Pressly who departed this life 24 Sep 1818, aged about 62 years. Eminently distinguished as the friend of the poor.

Associate Reformed Presbyterian Death & Marriage Notices Volume II: 1866-1888 Compiled by Lowry Ware Scmar , Columbia, South Carolina 1998

“Died on Monday, February 25th, [1856] at the residence of John T. Pressly, Allegheny, Pa., Jane Patterson Pressly, in the 87th year of her age…. Native of County Down, Ireland, and emigrated to this country when two years old with her father Samuel Patterson who settled in Abbeville, SC. Her father was a ruling elder…. [died] leaving behind him four sons and four daughters.? The deceased was the last survivor of her father’s family. She was the mother of nine children; two of who died in their youth. Her oldest son, Dr. Samuel Pressly, died some fifteen years hence. Of her sons, two are physicians and ruling elders, two are ministers, and one is a merchant and a ruling elder. Her oldest daughter is the widow of Dr. George R. Brown, and the youngest daughter is the widow of Rev. Joseph Lowry.

Jane Patterson Pressly Grave – Union Dale Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Plot: In Division One

Children of Jane and David:

i. Dr. Samuel Patterson Pressly b. 12 Sep 1792 in Long Cane, SC; d. 12 Oct 1837 Wilcox, Alabama; m. 1811 in Cedar Springs, Abbeville, SC to Elizabeth Knox Hearst (b. 1791 in Greenwood, SC – d. 1875 in Wilcox, Alabama) Her parents were also  Joseph Hearst (1760 – 1814) and   Jane Pressly(1762 – 1828).

He removed from Abbeville District S.C. to Preble County Ohio and practiced medicine there from 1811 to 1815. In 1815 he returned to Abbeville District S.C. where he practiced from 1815 to 1834. In later years he moved to Wilcox County Alabama, where he practiced until his death in 1837.

ii. Rev. John Taylor Pressly b. 28 Mar 1795 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC; d. 13 Aug 1870 Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; m. Jane Hearst (b. 1793 in Abbeville, Abbeville, SC – d. 5 Apr 1873 Pittsburgh, Penns.) Her parents were Joseph Hearst (1760 – 1814) and  Jane Pressly (1762 – 1828)  The Hearst of Cedar Springs are the great-great- grandparents of William Randolph Hearst of the publishing fame.

Rev John Taylor Pressly, D.D. (1795 –  1870)

John received D.D. degree from Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky. . The Princeton Review ranked Transylvania 1st among colleges with Greek life. Graduated from the Associated Reformed Presbyterian Seminary, New York City. July 10, 1817, D.D. New York City. He was pastor of Cedar Springs Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, Abbeville District S.C. for 11 years.

Operated Union Academy.

Jane Hearst was the daughter of of Joseph Albert Hearst and Jane Pressly, of Cedar Springs, Abbeville County, South Carolina. She was born of the 17th day of June 1793.

On July 4, 1816, Jane Hearst married John Taylor Pressly, son of David and Jane (née Patterson) Pressly; with whom she had nine children.

In October 1832, now Rev. John Pressly and Jane moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where he became minister of First A. R. P. Church. Jane Pressly was a devoted wife and helpmate in his service as a pastor to a growing congregation. Jane became well loved and appreciated for her devotion.

After Rev. Pressly died in 1870, Jane Pressly continued to be dedicated to his work until her death on April 4th 1873. Jane Hearst Pressly is buried beside her husband of 54 years in Union Dale Cemetery..

iii. Elizabeth Pressly b. 10 Jul 1797 in 96th District, South Carolina; d. 20 Apr 1857 in Preble, Ohio; m. 1810 South Carolina to Dr. George Brown (b. 1774 in Newberry, South Carolina – d. 21 Jun 1845 in Preble, Ohio) His parents were Nathan Brown (1731 – 1779) and Grissel Ritchey ( – 1810).

iv. Mary Pressly b. 10 Jul 1797 in Cedar Springs, Abbeville, SC; d. 17 Nov 1875 Jefferson, Georgia; m. 21 Feb 1813 in Cedar Springs, Abbeville, SC to Rev. Joseph Lowry (b. 1 Jan 1777 in Cedar Springs, Abbeville, SC – d. 23 Jul 1840 in Jefferson, Georgia) In the 1850 census, Mary was living with her son David and three other of her children in District 48, Jefferson, Georgia.

Joseph was pastor of Bethel Church in Jefferson County Georgia from 1814-1840

v. Dr. George W Pressly b. 9 Feb 1803 in Cedar Springs, Abbeville, SC;  d. 29 Dec 1870 Troy, Greenwood, South Carolina; m. 1820 in Abbeville, South Carolina to Isabella Hearst (b. 28 Mar 1806 in Abbeville, – d. 30 Nov 1858) another daughter of  Joseph Hearst (1760 – 1814) and   Jane Pressly  (1762 – 1828).  Her grandparents were John Hearst (1715- 1782) and Elizabeth Knox.

George spent most of his life in Abbeville District S.C. as a physician and legislator.

Degree: April 08, 1824, University of Pennsylvania

vi. James Patterson Pressly b. 25 Nov 1808, 3 miles north of Cedar Springs Associate Refomed Presbyterian Church in Abbeville Distict SC; d. 30 Mar 1877 Due West ARP Church Cemetery , Due West, Abbeville County, South Carolina; m1. Jane Hearst (b. 1811 in Abbeville – d. 30 Jun 1832 in Oak Hill, Wilcox, Alabama)  Her parents were John Hearst (1787 – 1843) and  Sarah Wardlaw (1791 – 1823)  She was a cousin of the Hearst girls who married James’ brothers; m2. Elizabeth Bonner Young (b. 1 Dec 1813 in Abbeville – d. 7 Jul 1841 in Due West, Abbeville, SC) Her parents were Samuel Young (1782 – 1856) and  Elizabeth Bonner (1789 – 1852); m3. Mary Eleanor Young (b. 19 Jul 1823 in Generostee, SC – d. 26 Jul 1892 Due West, Abbeville, SC) daughter of Francis Young and Nancy Little

In 1831, Jane Hearst married her childhood friend, James Patterson Pressly, son of David Pressly and the former Miss Jane Patterson. James Patterson Pressly was a young minister with the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church and emigrated with his wife to the Wilcox County area of Alabama; where several families from the Long Cane & Cedar Springs A.R.P. churches had settled.

Sadly, Jane Hearst Pressly died on the 30th of June 1832 not long after moving to Oakhill in Wilcox County at the age of 20 years, 8 months and 25 days..

James attended Union Academy operated by his brother Dr. John Taylor Pressly ( 1795-1870)

Graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio in 1826, He studied theology with his brother John Taylor Pressly. Licensed to preach 21 Feb 1829, Ordained 27 May 1830 as an Associate Reformed Presbyterian Minister. Held pastorates at Due West S.C., Generostee S.C. and Bethel in Laurens County S.C. Later visited pastorates in Ga., Alabama, and Florida. Then held pastorates for ten The next 35 years were spent at Erskine College, Due West, S.C. the longest serving member of the faculty during Erskine’s first century.

James Patterson Pressly circa 1875, from The centennial history of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church: 1803-1903, pg 299

Their son Rev. Frank Young Pressly was President of Erskine College (1899-1907)

vii. William Patterson Pressly b. 17 Mar 1811 in Greenwood, SC; m1. 1833 to Mary Gilmore (b. 1813 – 12 Oct 1836 in Preble County, Ohio) Her parents were Robert Gilmore and Sina Irwin; m2. Martha Miller (24 Oct 1806 – 20 Jul 1885) daughter of william Miller and Elizabeth Lackey; d. 3 Apr 1905 Monmouth, Illinois

Corresonded with her cousin Martha Miller of Va. After Mary Gilmore’s death William Patterson Pressly kept up the corresondence with Martha Miller, made a trip to Va., married her and brought her back to Fairhaven Ohio wher he kept a store. There the 3 Children of William and Martha were born. When the three children were grown they moved to Monmouth Illinois. Both William and Martha are buried in the old part of Monmouth Cemetery ( lot 100, block 9)

In the 1850 census, William and Martha were farming in Jefferson, Preble, Ohio. In the 1860 census, William was a merchant in Monmouth, Warren, Illinois.

1903 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois” Warren County :PRESSLY WILLIAM P.. was born near Abbeville. S. C, March 17, 1811. He was for a time, while a boy, a student at Miami University. Ohio. Then he engaged in farming and afterwards in business at Hamilton, Ohio. He came to Monmouth in 1859 and after farming for one year, became for the remainder of his active life a merchant. For many years his store was the favorite shopping place of Monmouth, especially for people from the country. He was a very successful business man of the highest standing. His credit and his character were never blemished. Mr. Pressly was married to Mary Gilmore, of Ohio, in 1833. She died in 1836. His second wife, Mary Miller, of Virginia, died in 1885. His son, Henry, a young man of fine ability and character, gave his life for his country in the Civil War.

Henry Pressley (1837-1861) attended a commercial college in Chicago; while there he was converted and by his Christian conversation and deportment had a great influence on his cousins, the children of Samuel Miller, who he visited in Memphis, Missouri, resulting in four of the brothers and sisters confessing Christ and uniting with the church. He went to Kansas, at that time almost a state of revolution, on the slavery question. Returning home, he enlisted in Company F 17th Illinois Infantry Regiment and in the next spring, 1861 was in the battle of Pittsburgh Landing (aka Battle of Shiloh);part of the siege of Vicksburg, he was killed; by the caving in of the earth, where they were excavating for a powder magazine. His remains were taken to his home in Monmouth for burial.

William also had three daughters, Virginia, Sarah and Mary, each died in early womanhood. Thus left childless, Mr. Pressly determined too become his own executor. In 1863 he gave to Monmouth College 700 acres of choice farming lands in Iowa. During 1870 and subsequent years he gave to the Warren County Library over $20,000, thus founding a library for popular use, erecting and donating the first building ever given for such a purpose in the State of Illinois. The liberal and sensible plans of the founder have brought too this institution constantly increasing prosperity and enlarging usefulness. It has been managed exactly in accordance with his wishes. A twin object of Mr. Pressly’s practical and liberal care has been the building and endowing of Mission Schools for native Christians in Egypt. For this purpose he has, also, given over $20,000. These schools have had excellent management. They have had remarkable success. The engraving accompanying this sketch is taken from a portrait painted thirty years ago. Mr. Pressly lives to enjoy the good which he has done. He has seen his gifts applied as he intended. He has won the respect and gratitude of thousands. His practical benevolence and his Christian character give him an abiding remembrance in this our land of the future as well as in the ancient land of the pyramids. His name will endure as the name of a helper of his fellowmen.

Monmouth College was founded on April 18, 1853 by the Second Presbytery of Illinois, a frontier arm of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The college celebrates this date annually as “Founders Day,” cancelling classes for a day of celebration and an honors convocation. Founded as “Monmouth Academy,” the school became Monmouth College after receiving a charter from the state legislature on September 3, 1856. The college remains affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and is a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest, a consortium of small, private liberal arts colleges. The college’s motto “Sit Lux” (“Let there be Light”) appears on its seal, but the college likes to describe itself as “What College Was Meant to Be.”

Monmouth College- Monmouth’s athletic teams are known as the Fighting Scots

Monmouth was one of the first institutions in the country to admit women from its inception. This increased the college’s early popularity and logically made it the home of the women’s sorority movement. Pi Beta Phi was founded on April 28, 1867 as I. C. Sorosis. Pi Beta Phi was the first national secret college society of women to be modeled after the Greek-letter fraternities of men. Kappa Kappa Gamma, founded in 1870, is another national sorority founded at Monmouth College

viii. Joseph Pressly b. 1813 in Long Canes, SC

7. Josiah Patterson

Josiah’s first wife Abigail Blair was born 1774. Her parents were Samuel Blair (d.1813-1815) and Agnes [__?__]. Abigail died 18 Apr 1823 at 48 years of age. Her body was interred in Rocky River Presbyterian Cem, Abbeville Co, SC.

Josiah’s second wife Sarah [__?__] was born in 1778 in Chester, South Carolina. Sarah’s first husband Capt. Jeremiah S. Terry was an elder in the Lower Cane Church before 1810 when he joined Rocky River Presbyterian Church in upper Abbeville District in the area called “Monterey”. He later became a Magistrate. Sarah died 14 Apr 1827 – Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina.

Josiah’s third wife Eleanor Phelps was born in 1775.

Josiah had 9 children, including Sarah Cowan Patterson.

In the Census of 1790 for Abbeville, SC Josiah Patterson is listed as owning 2 slaves. In the 1820 Census there is a Josiah Patterson Sr. listed as owning 21 slaves.

About 1810, Josiah Patterson removed into the congregation of Rocky River Presbyterian Church in upper Abbeville District, South Carolina where he was made a member of the session. He removed there from the Long Cane section in the lower part of the District. His is believed to have previously been an elder in the Lower Long Cane Church. [from the letters of Andrew Giles and John Spencer, October and November 1852]

The section of Abbeville District which was served by Rocky River Church was and is known as Monterey, today remembered by Monterey Road.

After his removal into the Township of Monterey, Josiah Patterson became a magistrate. [letter, 1 April 1957, Harold L. Carlisle, Calhoun Falls, South Carolina to Carroll Ruffin Patterson]

The estate of Major John Hearst, 2nd son of John Hearst the 1st ( d. 1782), was settled by Josiah Patterson, whose mother, Mary Carson, was a sister of Martha, the wife of Major John Hearst.

John’s son William G Hearst ( b. 1776 Woodvine, Abbeville, South Carolina – d. Nov 1844 Franklin, Missouri) m. 1817 in Biglow, Franklin, Missouri to Elizabeth Collins (b. 1780)

John’s grandson George F Hearst (3 Sep 1820 Anaconda, Franklin, Missouri – d. 28 Feb 1891 California; m. 15 Jun 1862 in Steelville, Crawford, Missouri to Phoebe Elizabeth Apperson (b. 3 Dec 1842 in Whitmire Settlem, Franklin, Missouri – d. 1919 in Colma, California) I attended Phoebe Heart Elementary School in San Diego, named because Phoebe helped found the California PTA.

I found Phoebe Apperson Hearst’s portrait in the school auditorium a little scary. This isn’t it, but its close

George F Hearst’s only son William Randolph Hearst (b. 29 Apr 1863 San Francisco, California – d. 14 Aug 1951 Beverly Hills, California) m. Millicent Veronica Willson (1882–1974) Marion Davies, mistress built a newspaper empire and Hearst Castle of course.

Josiah Patterson became a wealthy planter in the Monterey section of Abbeville District, his plantation lay along the Savannah River, or near it, at Smith’s Crossroads.

According to the records of Rocky River Presbyterian Church, Abbeville District [courtesy T. H. Spence, Jr. Executive Director of the Historical Foundation of the Presbyterian & Reformed Churches, Montreat, North Carloina, to Carroll Ruffin Patterson, 12 March 1959], Josiah Patterson was a prominent layman of that church:

He was elected a Trustee in 1821.

Was a member of the Session at the time of his death, 31 Oct. 1846.

Memeber and leader in Rocky River Religious Tract Soicety from 1818 until 1840 [minutes close with latter year]. He was president of the Society in 1818 and 1822 and on Board of Managers for a number of years.

The “Minute Book of the Rocky River Presbyterian Church,” Abbeville District [Now at the Historical Foundation, Montreat, North Carolina] says, in part:

2 June 1819 – Josiah Patterson was unanimously nominated by the Congregation to employ workmen to have pews made instead of the common seats then used in Rocky River Meeting House. In words of the Minute Book, “the church should be regularly pewed”.

1822 – He was again elected Trustee

In 1839 Josiah Patterson was Acting Justice of the Quorom for Abbeville District.

The cemetery of Rocky River Presbyterian Church, Abbeville County, South Carolina in which he and mony of his family are buried was originally known as Bull Town Cemetery and the church was first designated as Bull Town. It is located about eleven miles west of the town of Abbeville and four miles northest of the Town of Calhoun Falls. It is one of the oldest churches in the area, being established 1760 – 1765. Rocky River Church has been on three (3) separate locations – the seoncd is the site of the cemetery and is about one to one and one-half miles from the first and present location of the Church. The cemetery is on the 1820 Road, known as the Andersonville to Davis Bridge Road.

Josiah Patterson’s death is noted in the Old Minute Book of Rocky River Presbyterian Church, 1842 – 1876, as follows:

“Josiah Patterson, member of the Session, departed this life on 31st of October 1846.”

Josiah Patterson Will 1

Josiah Patterson Will 2

Children of Josiah and Abigail:

As Josiah Patterson and Abigail Blair used the names Cown and Adams for the middle names of four (4) of their children it is obvious that there is a close connection between those two families and the Pattersons or the Blairs. As of this writing, no such connection has been established. It is probable that Josiah Patterson’s mother was likely a Cown and Abigail Blair’s an Adams or vice versa. As one of the daughter’s was given the name Lovely as a middle name it is possible that there was kinship with that South Carolina family.

Dr. Nora Davis of Troy, South Carolina informed Carroll Ruffin Patterson that Adams is a very common name and a very good name in Edgefield County, which adjoined Abbeville County before McCormick County was formed (1914). It is believed that the middle name Pleasant of the sixth child was adapted from the maiden of Moses Waddel (28 July 1770 – 21 Jul 1840) wife Elizabeth Woodson Pleasants. Moses Waddel, an ordained Presbyterian minister, operated the Willington Academy and may well have known Josiah Patterson. Elizabeth Pleasants was his second wife, the first was Catherine Calhoun, sister of John Caldwell Calhoun (1782 – 1850), South Carolina’s great statesman. Waddel was President of Franklin College [now the University of Georgia], Athens, Georgia from 1819 to 1829 and is buried there.

i. Sarah Cowan Patterson, b. 24 Jan 1795, Ninety Six District, South Carolina; d. 11 May 1864, Abbeville District SC; m. 5 Mar 1812 in Abbeville, SC to Andrew Giles (b. 24 Nov 1784 in Wilkes, Georgia – d. 31 Jan  1867 Old Rocky River Presbyterian Cemetery
Abbeville County, South Carolina) His parents were Capt. James H Giles and Susannah Patterson (b. 1744 in Belfast, Antrim, , Ireland – d. 8 Mar 1824 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina) I don’t know if there was a relation.

In the 1850 census, Andrew and Sarah were living in Savannah River Regiment, Abbeville District SC with six children at home.

ii. Mary Adams Patterson, b. 17 Jan 1797, Abbeville District SC; d. May 14, 1871, Canton, Madison, Mississippi; m. 23 Dec 1823 in Marlboro, South Carolina to Rev. Robert Bond Campbell (b. 6 Dec 1796 in Abbeville, SC – d, 1 May 1870 in Canton, Mississippi)

Removed from Abbeville Distict S.C. to Lancaster S.C. 1826-1828; to Beaver Creek S.C. 1829; to Waxhaw S.C. 1831- 1837; to Camden S.C. in 1837 then to Madison County, Mississippi in 1845.

In the 1850 census, Robert was a clergyman in Madison, Mississippi.

The fates of their children are interesting and this is the only family of confederate officer ancestors on our tree so I’ll break my pattern and include our ancestor’s great grandchildren

1. Sarah Campbell b. 17 Oct 1824

2. Col. James Alexander Campbell b. 8 Mar 1826; m. Amanda Sharkey; d. 4 Feb 1864, Johnson’s Island, Lake County, Ohio

James was a Colonel commanding the 27th Mississippi Infantry, Conferate Army. Died as a prisoner of war of hepatitis at Johnson’s Island [the only Union POW Camp for officers] and is buried there. More than 15,000 men passed through Johnson’s Island until it was closed in September 1865. Wardens lost only about 200 prisoners as a result of the harsh Ohio winters, food and fuel shortages, and disease. Johnson’s Island had one of the lowest mortality rates of any Civil War prison. Confederates made many escape attempts, including efforts by some to walk across the frozen Lake Erie to freedom in Canada. A handful of escapes were successful.

Lawyer in Leake County, Mississppi.
Prewar Judge.
CAPT. CO E 27th MS, Apr 25,1861.
MAJOR 1862.
LT. COL. Dec 31, 1862.
COL. Mar 26, 1863.
PRISONER OF WAR ( POW ) Lookout Mountain, Nov 24, 1863, while in charge of the picket line. To Johnson’s Island.

3. Robert Bond Campbell b. 8 Jan 1828; d. 28 Jun 1863, Battle of Vicksburg Missippi.

4. Judge Josiah Abigail Campbell (wiki) b. 2 Mar 1830 in Camden, Lancaster, SC ; m. Eugenia Elizabeth Nash 13 May 1850 in Kosciusko, Mississippi; d. 10 Jan  1917 Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi,  A prominent Confederate States of America politician. Josiah later moved to Mississippi and served in the state legislature in 1851 and 1859. He was elected to the Provisional Confederate Congress (1861–1862) and served as its President pro tempore. He served as a colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He later served as Chief Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court from 1891 to 1894.

Political Graveyard – Also known as J. A. P. Campbell — of Kosciusko, Attala County, Miss.; Jackson, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., March 2, 1830Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1851-59; Speaker of the Mississippi State House of Representatives, 1859; delegate to Mississippi secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Mississippi to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; circuit judge in Mississippi; justice of Mississippi state supreme court, 1876-94; chief justice of Mississippi state supreme court, 1891-94. Died in Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., January 10, 1917 (age 86 years, 314 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss..

5.  Mary Louise Campbell  m1. Dr. [__?__] Scarborough; m2. Nimrod Nash, brother of Mary’s sister-in-laws Eugenia and Susan Nash; d. 1863, Battle of Gettysburg.

6. Judge Charles Henry Campbell b. 21 Dec 1836; m. Susan Emmaline Nash 6 Feb 1891 in Kosciusko, Mississippi; d. 7 Mar 1905.

7. Jane E Campbell m. James Grafton a planter in Madison Co. Mississippi.

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iii. Samuel Patterson, b. 27 Jan 1799.

iv. John Adams Patterson, b. 10 Mar 1801, Abbeville District SC; m. Alabama to Lenora Breazel (b. 1806 Tennessee – Aft 1860 census) . In the 1860 census, John and Lenora were farming in Athens, Limestone, Alabama. In the 1870 census, John was still living in Limestone, Alabama, but had remarried to Elmira [__?__] (b. 1816 Tennessee)

v. James Cowan Patterson, b. 6 Oct 1803, Abbeville District SC; d. 18 Jul 1866 Oak Hill Cemetery, Griffin, Spaulding County, Georgia; m. Laura Evans Winn (b. Abt. 1811 in Winnsboro, Fairfield S.C. – 1879 Oak Hill Cemetery, Griffin, Spaulding, Georgia)

James was a Presbyterian minister and Educator, having graduated from Franklin College [the founding college of the University of Georgia] in Athens, Georgia. He studied theology privately.

An early sketch, circa 1850, of the University of Georgia in Athens depicts the Franklin College quadrangle as seen from the southwest across Broad Street.

1822-1826– Tutor at Franklin College
Nov 1828 – Ordained as a Presbyterian Minister
1828- 1830 – Minister of Fairview Church, Lawrenceville Ga.
1841- 1843 – Minister of Alcovia Church of the Flint River Presbytery, Georgia.
1844-1850- Returned as Minister of Fairvoiew Church, Lawrenceville Ga.
1851- Returned to Alcovia Church and in that same year was at Goshen Church.
1856– He became President of the Synodical Female College in Griffin Georgia, where he served until his death in 1866. According to the City of Griffin, the college didn’t survived the war.

vi. Elizabeth Pleasant Patterson, b. 1 Sep 1807; d. 11 Nov 1823 Old Rocky River Church, Calhoun, South Carolina

vii. Louisa Abigail Patterson, b. 15 Oct 1810, Abbeville District SC.; d. Dec 1850 Pontotoc County, Mississippi; m. Thomas Twining Hamilton (b. 24 Jun 1797 South Carolina) His parents were John Hamilton and Mary Ann McGill; In the 1850 census, Thomas was a widow farming in Pontotoc, Mississippi with seven children at home.

viii. Jane Loveley Patterson, b. 11 Jan 1813, Abbeville District SC; m. 23 Aug 1832 in Abbeville, South Carolina to Richard Bohun Cater (b. 5 Jan 1811 – d. 23 May 1854 in Abbeville District SS) d. 1 Jan 1897, Abbeville District SC.

The Caters are of French extraction and are related to the DuPont family of New Jersey. They removed form Charleston, S.C. to the old Abbeville District, S.C. Children #2 through #9,[cp page 34], are buried in Rocky River Presbyterian Church Cemetery west of the town of Abbeville and northeast of the town of Calhoun Falls, S.C. as are their parents Jane Lovely Patterson and Richard Bohun Cater.

In the 1880 census, Jane was a 67 year old widow with seven children still at home in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina.

ix. Josiah Blair Patterson, b. J9 Jul 1815, Abbeville District, SC; d. 12 May 1864, Battle of Spotsylvania, Va.; buried Black Creek Church Cemetery, Waynesboro, GA; m. 11 Jan 1841, Decatur, GA to Mary Jane McNeil (b. 9 Feb 1822 – d. 27 Aug 1909), daughter of James McNeil

In the 1850 census, Josiah and Mary were living in Town, Gwinnett, Georgia with five children between 2 and 9 years old at home.

Carroll R. Patterson, the author of the Samuel Patterson reference, also compiled and privately published “THE INCOMPLETE CORRESPONDENCE OF LIEUT. JOSIAH BLAIR PATTERSON, 14TH REGIMENT GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, A.P. HILL’S LIGHT DIVISION” ( completed and privately published 20 May, 1961), a collection of several dozen “letters home” from Lt. Patterson as he served and fought with the Confederate Army ( Army of Northern Virginia) from 1861 until he was killed in action in the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse on May 12, 1864.

In 1833 James McNeill drew land in Cherokee county (before subdivision) in the Cherokee Gold Lottery– wonder whether he gave his land in what later became Forsyth County to Mary Jane McNeil who married Josiah Blair Patterson and lived in Forsyth County?

Josiah Blair Patterson 1863 Northern Virginia– Source: Carroll Ruffin Patterson

Josiah Blair Patterson enlisted Jul 4, 1861 in the Confederate Army as a 2nd Lieutenant of Company E, 14th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry (“Lester Volunteers” of Forsyth County, Thomas’ Brigade, Wilcox’s Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A.), where he served throughout his Civil War career. He was listed May 5, 1862 as Company E Recruiting Officer at Cumming, Forsyth County, GA. He was listed as acting Quartermaster in Oct 1862. On Nov 8, 1862 he was promoted to 1st Lieutenant and held that rank until his death. On May 12, 1864 during the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse Lt. Patterson was wounded and while being carried to the rear on a litter was hit a second time and killed.

8. Margaret (Peggy) Patterson

Margaret’s husband John Ebenezer Pressley was born about 1775. His parents were John Pressly and Isabella Fleming. His brother David married Margaret’s sister Jane. His sister Jane may have been an ancestor of George and William Randolph Hearst (See above). John died abt 1816 in Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina.

Margaret and John were married at Cedar Springs Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, Abbeville District, South Carolina

Child of Margaret and John:

i. Samuel P. Pressly, b. 25 Sep 1799 in Cedar Springs, Abbeville, South Carolina; d. 29 Sep 1839 in Athens, Georgia; m. Jane West Todd (c. 1797 in Ireland or 1805 Georgia – d. 01 Aug 1875 in Laurensville, South Carolina); Her parents were Andrew Todd and Jane West.

Samuel was educated at the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; studied theology under his cousin Dr. John Taylor Pressly ( 1795- 1870) (see above) at Cedar Springs Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Abbeville District S. C., then Pastor of the A.R.Presbyterian Church, Newberry S.C. In 1832 he removed to Athens Ga. to become Professor of Belles Lettres at Franklin College (now UGA).

His wife, Jane West Todd remained at Athens Ga for many years after his death. Then she, her daughter Corrine Myrtise Pressly, her daughter Antoinette Pressly and husband Francis James Brown removed from Athens to Knoxvile Tennessee. They returned to Athens after the death of Francis James Brown.

In the 1850 census, Jane, her daughters Corrina Pressly and Antoinette Brown, son-in-law Francis Brown were all living in Knoxville, Tennessee in the household of Joseph Brooks.

In the summer of 1852 she, her two daughters, and grandchild Mary removed from Athens Ga to Laurens District S.C. to the home of Jane West Todd’s parents.

[cp p. 28-A].

Sources:

Ancestry.com  US Census Records

“FROM COUNTY DOWN TO SOUTH CAROLINA – SAMUEL PATTERSON (died 1791-1792), AND HIS DESCENDENTS IN UPPER SOUTH CAROLINA AND BEYOND”  By Carroll Ruffin Patterson (1919-1991) of  Decatur, Dekalb County, Georgia  It was compiled between 1948 and 1963.  It consists of over 287 pages with almost twice that many pages of appendices, annotations, updates, inserts and a comprehensive index of names.

“Scotch-Irish Migration to South Carolina, 1772: Reverend William Martin And His Five Shiploads of Settlers” by Jean Stephenson (Shenandoah Publishing House 1970).

http://www.pcdl.lib.oh.us/marriage/details.cfm?ID=3644

http://ohpreble.ohgenweb.net/index.htm

http://members.core.com/~sharprm/library/patterso.htm

http://preble.ohgenweb.net/fgs/query002.htm#164

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/IGI/individual_record.asp?recid=100370921869&lds=1&region=11&regionfriendly=North+America&frompage=99

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14570044/person/126857825

http://www.magoo.com/hugh/robert.html

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriots_sc_capt_john_cowan.html

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scyork/RevWar/KingsMtnRoster.html

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriot_military_sc_captains.htm

http://www.genealogy.com/users/c/r/o/Carl-A-Crowley-iii/FILE/0002page.html

History of Preble County, Ohio 1881 – H. Z. Williams & Bro., Publishers, Cleveland Ohio

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=11806451&st=1

http://www.amcolan.info/Hearst/hearst.php#HearstJohnb21Feb1783

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15 Responses to Samuel Senton Patterson Sr.

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  3. Joe Patterson says:

    Do you have any information on :

    Joseph Patterson, Sr. received a land grant from King George II in 1774. Land located on Buck Head Creek. He came to this country from Ireland with several brother. His brother went west, we think to Ohio, and he came to South Carolina with his infant daughter, Betsy, who was born in Virginia where her mother, Joseph’s first wife, died.

    Three children born in South Carolina by second wife, Pamela Hall.
    Robert Patterson 1808
    Joseph Patterson Jr. 1812
    Nancy Patterson

    Thank you.

    Joe Patterson
    111 West MainSt.
    New Holland, PA 17557
    717-823-7556

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  6. markeminer says:

    I updated this page to include Samuel Patterson Sr’s grandchildren. and expand the stories of his children and son-in-law. Our part of the Patterson Clan (Scotch Irish Seceeders) followed their pastor Alexander Porter from Abbeville, South Carolina to Preble, Ohio in the early 1800’s because they were disgusted with slavery (or so the story goes) Many members of the McCaw family [my great grandmother’s clan] made the same trip. In this update, I discovered that some of the Patterson clan stayed in the South and became quite successful: Colonels, Captains, College Professors and even College Presidents, Pastors, and Judges, Our only Southern gentry relatives.

    William and John McGaw married sisters Mary and Sarah Patterson. They were both Captains in the Revolutionary War

    In the Revoluition
    son-in-law William McGaw was a Captain in South Carolina Troops Militia / Ninety-Six District Regiment, like our ancestors, William moved to Preble, Ohio and became a Ruling Elder.

    son-in-law John McGaw was a captain in the Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment

    Son John was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, serving as a substitute for his father in August 1778 when he was just 15 1/2 years old; he saw service in the Carolinas in 1778, 1780 and 1781 and was discharged March 1781. He was in both the infantry and cavalry. I found his long 1832 pension petition detailing his service. John also became a church elder in Preble, Ohio.

    Grandson Rev. John Taylor Pressly received a D.D. degree from Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky. around 1818 .

    Grandson Dr. George W Pressly spent most of his life in Abbeville District S.C. as a physician and legislator.

    Grandson James Patterson Pressly graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio in 1826, He Held pastorates at Due West S.C., Generostee S.C. and Bethel in Laurens County S.C. Later visited pastorates in Ga., Alabama, and Florida. Then held pastorates for ten The next 35 years were spent at Erskine College, Due West, S.C. the longest serving member of the faculty during Erskine’s first century.

    Great grandson Rev. Frank Young Pressly was President of Erskine College (1899-1907)

    Son Josiah Patterson became a weathy planter and magistrate in the Monterey section of Abbeville District, his plantation lay along the Savannah River, or near it, at Smith’s Crossroads. In the Census of 1790 for Abbeville, SC Josiah Patterson is listed as owning 2 slaves. In the 1820 Census there is a Josiah Patterson Sr. listed as owning 21 slaves. Interesting as other brothers moved with their pastor to Preble, Ohio it is said to avoid slavery.

    The fates of Josiah’s grand children are interesting and this is the only family of confederate officer ancestors on our tree so I broke my pattern and included our ancestor’s great grandchildren

    Col. James Alexander Campbell 27th Mississippi Infantry, Conferate Army. Prewar Judge d. 4 Feb 1864, Johnson’s Island, Lake County, Ohio Died as a prisoner of war of hepatitis at Johnson’s Island [the only Union POW Camp for officers] and is buried there. More than 15,000 men passed through Johnson’s Island until it was closed in September 1865. Wardens lost only about 200 prisoners as a result of the harsh Ohio winters, food and fuel shortages, and disease. Johnson’s Island had one of the lowest mortality rates of any Civil War prison.

    Judge Josiah Abigail Campbell (wiki) b. 2 Mar 1830 in Camden, Lancaster, SC ; ; d. 10 Jan 1917 Jackson, Hinds, Mississippi, A prominent Confederate States of America politician. Josiah later moved to Mississippi and served in the state legislature in 1851 and 1859. He was elected to the Provisional Confederate Congress (1861–1862) and served as its President pro tempore. He served as a colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. He later served as Chief Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court from 1891 to 1894.

    Judge Charles Henry Campbell b. 21 Dec 1836; m. Susan Emmaline Nash 6 Feb 1891 in Kosciusko, Mississippi; d. 7 Mar 1905.

    Grandson James Cowan Patterson, b. 6 Oct 1803, a Presbyterian minister and Educator, having graduated from Franklin College [the founding college of the University of Georgia] in Athens, Georgia. 1856– He became President of the Synodical Female College in Griffin Georgia, where he served until his death in 1866. According to the City of Griffin, the college didn’t survived the war

    Grandson 2nd Lt Josiah Blair Patterson, b. 19 Jul 1815, Abbeville District, SC; d. 12 May 1864, Battle of Spotsylvania, Va. Carroll R. Pattersonm, the author of the Samuel Patterson reference, also compiled and privately published “THE INCOMPLETE CORRESPONDENCE OF LIEUT. JOSIAH BLAIR PATTERSON, 14TH REGIMENT GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, A.P. HILL’S LIGHT DIVISION” ( completed and privately published 20 May, 1961), a collection of several dozen “letters home” from Lt. Patterson as he served and fought with the Confederate Army ( Army of Northern Virginia) from 1861 until he was killed in action,.

    Grandson Samuel P. Pressly, was educated at the University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; studied theology under Dr. John Taylor Pressly ( 1795- 1870) at Cedar Springs Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Abbeville District S. C., then Pastor of the A.R.Presbyterian Church, Newberry S.C. In 1832 he removed to Athens Ga. to become Professor of Belles Lettres at Franklin College (now UGA).

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  11. Nurse Patterson says:

    Perhaps you should look into all the slaves they owned… I’ve done quite some research of my own and found that my mothers great grandfather was a descendant and a slave of one of these Patterson’s, he was listed on the census as a Mulatto farmer (guess he was free), his mother not so lucky a slave. African Americans Patterson’s from Edgefield, Sulada, Aiken….. I tell you, always leave out that part of history. Plenty of African descendants to go around.

    • Nurse Patterson says:

      Also funny thing is my Great Great Grandfather was named Samuel Patterson… Abbeville, Saluda, Aiken, and Edgefield where a large majority of the Black Patterson’s remain.

  12. Terese Mitchell says:

    Wonderful site, great job! My Harrises were also in the Bulltown area and members of Rocky River Church. I believe your Pattersons will connect in some way maybe back in Ireland to those mentioned in the book written in the late 1800’s be Robert Stewart titled, Colonel George Steuart and Margaret Harris. The Pressleys of Abbeville are also briefly mentioned. Available as a free book on Google. I didn’t realize the Rocky River Church was formed as early as between 1760 to 1765 so that helps me place my line there. James Caldwell was one of the first elders and was married to Elizabeth Harris, daughter of Rebecca McBay and John Harris. Other children included Major William Harris of Bulltown plantation married to Margaret Willson, son Thomas Harris who died 1827 first wife unknown second Mary Sharp Cain and son John Harris whom I believe was married to Mary Thompson, daughter of Matthew Thompson of Rocky River Church. The Harrises and most of the families around them have roots in Ayrshire, Scotland. My Harrises emigrated from Donegal, Ireland in 1733 to Lancaster, Pennsylvania with the Pickens, Calhouns and McCalls. My Group 3 DNA Harrises are not the Welsh Rev. John line also in Bulltown and that makes for confusing research. I wish there was some forum where we could pool info. The Long Canes list has gone dormant. If you have any Harris connection, please let me know, Terese. Teresemitchell@outlook.com

  13. I am related to Josiah B. Patterson on my mother’s side. I found this post while searching for more generations and just wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed this! I was able to find two more greats because of this!

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