Peter Winne I

Pieter WINNE I. (1609 -1693 ) was Alex’s 10th Grandfather; one of 2,048 in this generation of the Shaw line.

Pieter Winne was born Mar 1609 in Ghent, Flanders, (now Belgium). He was baptized 14 Apr 1609 at St. Bavo’s Cathedral, Ghent, Belgium. His parents were Franciscus WINNE and Anna [__?__]. He married Aechie Jans Van SCHAICK in 1635 in Leeswarden, Vrieslandt, Netherlands.   After Aechie died, he married in Tannatje Adams in 1658 in Albany, NY.  Pieter died in Bethlehem, Albany County, NY sometime after 4 May 1690, when he witnessed the baptism of his grandson by his son Frans, and before 7 May 1693, when Tanneke remarried.

Peter was baptized at St. Bavo’s Cathedral, Ghent, Belgium in 1609.

Aechie Jans Van Schaick was born in 1613 in Leeuward, Netherlands.  Aechie died 1647 in Curaçao, West Indies.

Tannatje Adams was born about 1638 in Leeswarden, Vrieslandt, Netherlands. she was 29 years younger than Peter.  Her parents were Albert Adams and Aeltje Wygerts.    After Pieter died, she married Marten Cornelisz Van Buren.  Tannatje died in 1694 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY.

Marten Cornelise Van Buren was born 1638-1639 at Fort Orange, New York. In 1665 he married Marytjie Quackenbosch (born 1646 in Questgeest, near Leider, Netherlands) at Fort Orange.  Marten owned a house and barn in Bethlehem, NY, which he sold in 1662.  Marten leased half of Constapel Island from Teunis Spitsbergen, south of Albany, and Marytjie died there in December of 1683.  Peter  Winne bought the other half of the island in Jul 1675 so Tannatje and Marten shared an island before they shared a marriage. They also shared sons and daughters in law in 1682 when, Marten’s son Teuntje Martens Van Buren married Tannatje Adams: step-son, Levinus VanSchaick Winne.  In May 1693, Marten married a second time, to Tanneke Adams, widow of Pieter Pieterson Winne.  Marten died on 13 Nov  1703, in Kinderhook, New York.

In case you are wondering, Marten Cornelise Van Buren is indeed the ancestor of President Martin Van Buren.  The lineage goes like this:

3rd Great Grandfather = Cornelis Maessen Van Buren had come to the New World in 1631 from the small city of Buren, Gelderland, Dutch Republic.

2nd Great Grandfather = Marten Cornelise Van Buren (1638-1703) m1. Marytjie Quackenbosch  m2. Tannatje Adams Winne

Great Grandfather = Pieter Martense Van Buren (1670-1740) m. Judikje Barentse Meinderts

Grandfather = Marten Pieterse Van Buren (1701-1740) m. Dirkje Van Alstyne

Father = Abraham Van Buren (1737-1817) m. Maria Hoes.  He was a farmer, the owner of six slaves, and a tavern-keeper in Kinderhook, NY

8th U.S. President  – Martin Van Buren (1782-1862) m. Hannah Hoes, his childhood sweetheart and distant relative.  He was the first president born a citizen of the United States and was also the only President who spoke English as a second language.

8th President of the United States In office March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1841

Children of Pieter and Aechie:

Name Born Married Departed
1. Pieter WINNE II c. 1643 Curaçao, West Indies Jannetje ALBERTSE
1661 in Kingston, New York
6 Jul 1684 Albany, NY
2. Levinus VanSchaick Winne c. 1647
Curaçao, West Indies
Teuntje Martens Van Buren
c. 1682
Albany, NY
.
Willemtje Viele
20 Jun 1699
Albany, NY.
15 Nov 1706
Albany, NY

.

Children of Peter and Tannatje Adams:

Name Born Married Departed
3. Frans Pietersen Winne 1659
Bethlehem, Albany, New York
Elsje Gansevoort 12 May 1689 Albany, New York 1749
Albany, Albany, New York
4. Adam Winne 1663
Albany, NY
Annetje Loockermans 1691
Albany, NY
5. Aletta  (Allette) Winne 1666 or 1662 Caspar Leendertse Conyn
6 Jul 1684 in Albany, New York,
1730
Albany, NY
6. Kilian Winne 1668
Bethlehem, Albany, New York
6 Jul 1684
Albany, New York,
7. Catalyntje Winne 1670 Albany, New York, Hendrick Janse Witbeck 1682 in Claverack, Columbia, New York Sep 1707
Claverack, Columbia, New York,
8. Tomas (Thomas) Winne 1670
Bethlehem, Albany, New York,
Teuntje Janse Goes 20 Oct 1689 in Albany, New York  20 Oct 1705
9. Martin Pietersen Winne 1671
Albany, NY
Margreta Simonse Van Winkle
30 Oct 1697 Hackensack, Bergen, New Jersey,
8 Jul 1737
Bergen, Bergen, New Jersey
10. Eva Winne 1673 Bethlehem, Albany, New York John Woodart
7 Dec 1697 Albany, New York
 1703
New York,
11. Jacobus Winne  1676
Albany, NY
Maritje Bronk
7 Oct 1696 in Albany, Albany, New York,
25 Sep 1706
Albany,  New York
12. Rachel Winne 1677
Bethlehem, Albany, New York
Jellis Adam Fonda
11 Dec 1695 in Albany, New York
10 Jun 1727 Schenectady, Albany, New York
13. Daniel Winne 1678
Bethlehem, Albany, New York
Dirkje Van Ness
16 Mar 1698 in Albany, New York
1757
Renss Manor, New York

Peter first immigrated from Holland to Curaçao and lived their from at least 1643 when Peter II was born to 1652 when he arrived in Fort Orange.

Curaçao was occupied by the Dutch in 1634. The Dutch West India Company founded the capital of Willemstad on the banks of an inlet called the ‘Schottegat’.  Curaçao had been ignored by colonists because it lacked many things that colonists were interested in, such as gold deposits.  However, the natural harbour of Willemstad proved quickly to be an ideal spot for trade. Commerce and shipping — and piracy—became Curaçao’s most important economic activities

Pieter Winne was the founder and patriarch of the Winne family of early Albany. He was born in Ghent, Flanders (Belgium) in 1609, the son of Franciscus and Anna Winne.  He was 49 years old when he married Frieslander Tannetje Adams who was only 20 at time.  They had 12 children, so Pieter had a very active second half of life.

He brought that family to New Netherland during the 1650s where he became a tenant in the colony of Rensselaerswyck. His farm was in the southwestern part of the manor called Bethlehem where he also operated a sawmill . By the end of the decade he also was established in Beverwyck – where he owned a house and became a prominent fur trader.

Winne’s house and mill were situated on a creek named Vloman Kill, or Fleming’s Creek, in recognition of his Flemish origins. The Winne family continued to reside along the creek through the end of the nineteenth century.

Vloman Kill in Albany County, New York

For nearly 200 years, the Winnes were tenants of the Van Rensselaer family, the great patroons, or manorial lords, of the Albany region. Their one-million-acre estate was known as Rensselaerswyck. The Van Rensselaers lived in a grand manor house built 1765–69 in the English Georgian style. The Winnes’ rent varied over time. Until 1764, they ceded 10 percent of their annual produce to the Van Rensselaers. After that, they were required to pay a fixed rate of ten bushels of wheat per year. When Peter Winne first settled in Rensselaerswyck, his rent went to Jan Baptist Van Rensselaer.

Subsequently, Winne gravitated more to the countryside where he held substantial lands. For several decades, farmer and mill operator Pieter Winne was one of the principal personages of Bethlehem. He was also active in the Albany Dutch church – serving in a number of capacities.

He wrote a will in 1677 and another one in July 1684. In the second will, he characterized himself as a magistrate living in Bethlehem and that he was “sick in body but of sound memory and understanding.” It named his wife as sole heir during her widowhood. It also identified their twelve living children – whom he made his secondary heirs.

Founder of a large regional family, Pieter Winne lived into his eighties. He died during the early 1690s and his widow re-married in 1693. His descendants were mainline residents of colonial Albany and prominent throughout the region.

Pieter Winne (Winnen) is also referred to as Pieter de Vlamingh (the Fleming) and Vloman Kill in Albany is named for him.

Timeline

1652 – He arrived at Fort Orange  where he became a tenant in the colony of Rensselaerswyck and began paying rent and tithes for use of a farm near Bethlehem. His farm was in the southwestern part of the manor called Bethlehem where he also operated a sawmill along the Vloman Kill.

1652 – He was reimbursed by the Dutch Reformed Church for a cot he made for a sick person.

1652 thru 1 May 1655 – He was charged in the accounts with an annual rent of f375 and from stubble time, for a farm, apparently situated at Bethlehem,  also with two years’ rent of a sawmill, at f150 a year; and with two years’ hire of two horses for the mill at f60 a year. Included with the farm were three mares, one yearling mare, one stallion, one gelding, four cows, and one young bull.

10 Apri 1655 – The farm was taken over by Eldert Cruyff (or Gerbertsz).

11 May 1655 – He requested lot #5, toward the hill.

1672 – He was appointed a magistrate for Bethlehem. He served until October 1684 (age 73) when he was replaced.

1673 – Peter purchased a saw mill on the Bethlehem Kil from Stephan Van Cortlandt

Jul 1675 – Peter bought of Volkert Janse Douw one half of Constapel’s Island. The island lied over against de Paerde hoeck (Horse Point). The other half of the island was owned by Teunis  Spitsbergen and leased by Marten Cornelissen Van Buren. It included half a house, barn, and rick. The island was to be paid for in three installments, ending in 1677. The down payment was six beaver skins, and the three installments were 21 beaver skins each.

Also in 1677 – He bought of Nicholas Van Rensselaer a saw mill in Bethlehem, which formerly had been the property of Eldert Gerbertse Cruyff.

Peter Winne in Albany bought in 1677 one half of Constapel’s island.  It is also called Pachonakellick Island or Mahikander’s Island, (Mohegan in Dutch)  ‘obliquely over against Bethlehem.  At one time it was owned in partnership of Abraham De Truwe  with Andries Herbertsen Constapel, and hence sometimes call Constapel’s Island.   It’s not an island today, but you can see a likely candidate across the Hudson from Glenmont separated from the mainland by a wide ditch in this Google Satelite View.

The Island had been purchased from Indians 18 years before.

Pachonakellick Island Purchase 1

Pachonakellick Island Purchase 2

Also in 1677 Peter bought a saw-mill in Bethlehem, N.Y.,of Nicholaus Van Rensselaer.

28 Sep 1676 – Peter served on an “extraordinary court” convened by the governor and council of New York to resolve a dispute between Rev. Nicolaas Van Rensselaer and Dominie Gideon Schaets concerning some allegedly heretical declarations concerning doctrines made by Van Rensselaer in a sermon he preached on 13 Aug 1676. The decision of the court was “that Parties, shall both forgive and forget as it become Preachers of the Reformed Religion to do; also that all previous variances, church differences & provocations shall be consumed in the fire of Love; a perpetual silence and forbearance being imposed on each respectively; to live together as Brothers for an example to the worthy Congregation, for edification to the Reformed Religion, and further for the removal and banishment of all scandals.”

21 Jun 1681 – Harmon Jansen Lyndyarer gave Peter a deed to a house and lot in Albany. On 27 June of that year, he sold half his interest in the saw mill.

6 July 1684 – Peter made a will in which he stated that he was born in Gent in Flanderen. This will replaced one he had made on 1 June 1677. His final will was dated 31 December 1688.   Witnesses: Marten Gerritse and Cornelis van Dyck. Printed in Early Records of Albany, volume 4, 127-29. Letters of administration were granted to Casper Leendertse Conyn and Livinius Winne on February 22, 1696.

In the name of God, Amen. By the contents of this present public instrument know all men that in the year after the birth of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, one thousand six hundred and eighty-four, on the 6th of July, about midday, and in the thirty-sixth year of his majesty’s reign Charles the second, before me, Robert Livingston, secretary of Albany, colony of Renselaerswyk and Shinnechtady, etc., and before the hereinafter named witnesses, came and appeared the Honorable Pieter Winne, magistrate, born in the city of Gent in d Landeren, at present sick in body but of sound memory and understanding as is clearly apparent, who, considering the shortness and frailty of human life, the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time and hour thereof, therefore wishing to dispose of his temporal effects to be left behind while he yet by God’s grace is able, and doing so of his own free will and motion, without the inducement or misleading of anyone, he now ordains and determines that his last will and testament in form and manner following:

First and foremost commending his immortal soul (whenever it shall be separated from his body) to the gracious and merciful hands of his Creator and Savior and his body to a Christian burial, likewise canceling and revoking and annulling thereby all and every such testamentary disposition and bequest as he before the date hereof may have made and executed, especially that will by himself and wife made under date of the first of June 1677, written by Mr. Adriaen van Ilpendam, notary public, holding the same null and of no effect and now making a new disposition, this testator declares that he has nominated and instituted, as he does nominate and institute hereby, his worthy and beloved wife Tannetje Adams as his sole and universal heir of all his lands, property real and personal, claims, credits, money, gold, silver coined and uncoined, jewels, clothing, linen, woolens, household furniture, etc., nothing excepted, so long as she remains in her widowed state, without her being called upon or annoyed by any one of the children, or anyone for them, for an inventory or anything appertaining to the estate and after her death shall his estate be equally divided among the children whom they have begotten together, share and share alike. But if his wife enters the marriage state again, then she shall be holden to divide and apportion the whole estate;

that is to say, a just half thereof as it then may be found to the behoof of the children whom he has begotten by his present wife aforenamed, namely Adam Winne, Livinus, Frans, Allette, wife of Casper Leendertse Tenyn, Killiaen, Tomas, Lyntje, Marte, Jacobus, Eva, Daniel, and Rachel Winne; and the other half to the behoof of his wife, and this reservation that she remain holden to the minor children to bring up in the fear of the Lord, and cause them to learn reading and writing and a trade or handicraft wherewith in due time they may, by God’s favor, and with honor obtain their subsistance, the legitimate portion of said minor children remaining so long in the hands of their mother aforesaid and the rents and profits thereof being by her received until they arrive at maturity and enter into matrimony, she giving good security that the portions of the minor children be not lessened; and to the other children who may be already married and have arrived at their majority to pay over their portion pro rata, as their shares in the estate may be, share and share alike, no more to the eldest than to the youngest; she being holden to deliver an inventory of the whole estate and confirm the same, if necessary, by oath. The testator wills and ordains hereby that after his death his oldest son Pieter Pieterse Winne, dwelling in the Sopus, shall out of the common estate receive once for all the sum of ten beavers in place of his legitimate portion and entire inheritance, wherewith he shall be content, without any more, not willing that he or anyone for him shall make the least claim any more upon the testator’s estate, directly or indirectly.

The testator further desires that if it please God the Lord both he and his wife to remove, both being now sick, the whole estate shall be kept together, without any division or partition, until the youngest child shall attain her majority or enter the marriage state, and then be divided among the aforesaid twelve children, share and share alike, the portion of that child or children who die in their nonage to go to the survivors.

The testator excludes herein the honored orphan masters (saving all honor and respect) and in their place requests and constitutes, as he hereby does Mr. Marte Gerritse and Mr. Cornelis van Dyck (who have accepted the same) to see the contents of this his last will and testament promptly and uprightly carried out in all its parts and provisions. All which he, the testator, declares to be his last will and testament, desiring the same after his death to have full force and effect whether as will, codicil, donation, gift in anticipation of death, or otherwise, as the same may be last maintained, notwithstanding that some formalities demanded by law or custom may not have been fully observed herein; desiring the utmost benefit hereof to be received, and one or more copies hereof to be made and executed as occassion may require. This done and executed at Bethlehem, lying in the county of Albany on Hudson’s river, two miles to the south of the city of Albany, at the house of the testator, which [will] he has signed and sealed in the presence of Mr. Marte Gerritse and Mr. Cornelis van Dyck, magistrates called as witnesses hereto, the year, month and day aforenamed.

Children

The order and exact birth dates of Pieter’s children is subject to interpretation as few baptism records seem to exist.

1. Pieter WINNE II (See his page)

2. Levinus Van Schaick Winne

Levinus’ first wife Teuntje Martens Van Buren was born 1644 in Albany, Albany, New York. Her parents were Marten Cornelise Van Buren and Marytjie Quackenbosch. Marten Cornelise Van Buren married Levinus’ step-mother, Tannatje Adams in May 1693.  Teuntje died 20 Jun 1699 in Albany, Albany, New York.

Levinus’ second wife Willemtje Viele was born 1664 in Fort Orange, Albany, New York. Her parents were Aernoudt Viele and Gerritje Gerritse. She was widow of Simon Schermerhorn. Willemtje died 1712 in Claverack, Albany, New York,

Levinus grew up at the family mill in Bethlehem and at his father’s trading house in Bevewyck/Albany. In 1684, he was left a share in his father’s extensive estate. By the early 1680s, he had married Teuntje Martens Van Buren.  By 1687, the marriage had produced four children who were baptized at the Albany Dutch church where he was a member and frequent baptism sponsor. However, Teuntje Martens died and Livinius married Willempie Viele (widow of Simon Schermerhorn) in June 1699. By 1705, three more children had been baptized in Albany. Livinius Winne was a tenant farmer in Rensselaersyck (probabaly on Castle Island) and in Albany where he owned houses and lots. He served on Albany juries and as firemaster. In 1699, he joined his Albany neighbors in swearing allegiance to the king of England. Livinius Winne died in November 1706″.

3. Frans Winne

Frans’ wife Elsje Gansevoort was born 1671 in Albany, New York. Her parents were Harmen Gansevoort and Commertje Leendertse Conyn. Elsje died 1728 in Albany, Rensselaer, New York.

4. Adam Winne

Adam’s wife Annetje Loockermans was born in 1664 in Albany, Albany, New York. Her parents were Pieter Janse Loockermans and Maria [__?__].. After Adam died, she married 18 Oct 1691 in Albany Reformed Dutch Church, Albany, New York to Jacob Teunise Van Woert (b. 1651 in Albany, New York; d. 1730 in Albany, New York) Annetje died in 1742.

5. Aletta (Allette) Winne

Aletta’s husband Caspar Leendertse Conyn was born 1657 in Albany, Albany, New York. His parents were Leendert Phillipse Conyn and Agnietje Casperse. Aletta died in 1727 in Claverack, Greene, New York.

Aletta and Casar’s daughter Anetje  married Gerrit Hendricksz Van Wie, son of Hendrick Gerritse Van WIE and Eytje ARIAANSZ.

7. Catalyntje Winne

Catalyntje’s husband Hendrick Janse Witbeck was born 2 Jul 1653 in Albany, New York. His parents were Jan Thomase Witbeck and Geertruyd Andrissen Van Doesburgh. Hendrick died in 1737 in Claverack, Columbia, New York.

8. Tomas (Thomas) Winne

Thomas’ wife Teuntje Janse Goes was born 1671 in Albany, Albany, New York. Her parents were Jan Tyssen Goes and Styntje Van Hoesen. Teuntje died in 1711.

9. Martin Pietersen Winne

Martin’s wife Margreta Simonse Van Winkle was born 4 Nov 1676 in Aquaannona, Essex, New Jersey. Her parents were Symon Jacobse Van Winkle and Annatje Arianse Sip. Margreta died 1 Dec 1730 in Elizabethtown, New Jersey.

10. Eva Winne

Eva’s husband John Woodart was born 1672 in Albany, New York. His parents were xx. John died in 1732.

11. Jacobus Winne

Jacobus’ wife Maritje Bronk was  born 1678 in Albany, Albany, New York. Her parents were Pieter Jonasson Bronck and Hilletje Tyssinck. Maritje died in 1780.

12. Rachel Winne

Rachael’s husband Jellis Adam Fonda was born 1670 in Albany, New York. His parents were Douwe Jellis Fonda and Rebecca Conyn. Jellis died 8 Sep 1737 in Schenectady, New York.

13. Daniel Winne

Daniel’s wife Dirkje Van Ness was born 1678 in Albany, Albany, New York. Her parents were Jan Cornelise Van Ness and Alltje Vanesch. Dirkje died in 1719.

Many genealogies say that Daniel, was born in 1663, but others say he was the youngest son, he did inherit his father’s property as youngest sons often did.  If he were born in 1675, he would have been 23 , slighltly older than his wife, 20 years old when he married.  If he was born in 1663, he would have been 35 unusually old for a first marriage in those days.

Pieter Winne I and his family were favored tenants on the manor. Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, son of the founder of Rensselaerwyck, and later the fifth patroon of Rensselaerswyck, was Daniel Pietersz’ tutor.

When young Daniel inherited his father’s life-tenancy on the land, his home, and his sawmill, he was granted additional land upstream, where, in turn, his son, Peter Daniel (1699–1759) and grandson, Daniel Peter (1720–1800), built homes; the former circa 1725 (the house still stands in present-day Bethlehem, New York, about five miles south of Albany) and the latter in 1751; Daniel Peter’s home was part of the last generation of houses built in the time-honored anchor bent framing tradition of the New York Dutch. Daniel also inherited the  property in Cedar Hill, along the Hudson, where the Winne dock was located in the 1800’s.

One of Daniel’s 1 other sons, Frans, married Agnietje Van Wie and had a farm that is marked by a roadside marker as “Winne farm” on Van Wie point, near Cedar Hill. It looks like the Winne’s were quite spread out in the Bethlehem area.

Their youngest son, Daniel Pietersz Winne, inherited the family farmstead. Before his death, Daniel Pietersz granted nearby land to his eldest son Peter Daniel.  Five years after his marriage to Rachel van Alan, he built the house now owned by Brian Parker.

Like his father, Peter Daniel settled his eldest son on land about a half mile away. Daniel Peter Winne married Jannetje de Forest in 1744 and six years later built a house almost exactly like his father’s. Their descendents lived in the house for the next two hundred years.

Threatened with imminent destruction in 2002, the 1751 Daniel Peter Winne house was purchased by the historic preservation firm of J. M. Kelley Limited, Niskayuna, New York, and subsequently sold to The Metropolitan Museum of Art.3 Superbly documented and meticulously dismantled, the main dwelling chamber was reconstructed on the third floor of the American Wing by the Kelley firm under the supervision of the curatorial staff, where it now joins two splendid English-style framed seventeenth-century New England rooms from Ipswich, Massachusetts, and Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

The Winne House had two rooms on the ground floor, with a half-story above and a cellar below. The Museum installed the larger of the two first-floor chambers, which was accessed through the dwelling’s front entrance, an iconic, two-section, Dutch door

The New York Dutch Room  in the New York Metropolitan Museum comes from a house built in 1751 in Bethlehem, New York, for Daniel Pieter Winne (1720–1800). The woodwork demonstrates the reliance on traditional Netherlandish building practices in late colonial New York. Dutch immigrants began settling the Hudson River Valley in the early seventeenth century but continued to construct houses and barns much as they had in the Netherlands through the end of the eighteenth century.

Another relative’s house was also reconstructed in a musuem. In 1925 the Brown-Pearl House, built by Cornelius BROWN Jr.  was acquired by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and dismantled.  The living area was reconstructed as an exhibit hall – an example of colonial architecture and early domestic life.  It was taken down and stored 10 or 11 years ago when the museum began construction of the new Art of the Americas Wing. On Nov. 20th, 2010, the new wing was opened to the public and the Brown–Pearl Hall is again on display as a gallery in the lowest level of the new wing.

New York Dutch Room, Bethlehem, New York, 1751  (Too dark for photos when I visited)

Distinctive Dutch Joint (I took this one May 29, 2012)

Window detail (I took this one May 29, 2012)

The New York Dutch Room is presented as a decorative arts gallery rather than furnished as a period room. It features furniture, metalwork, ceramics, and glass distinctive to New York households of Dutch heritage.

This isometric drawing of the Winne Houses frame indicates the arrangement of the anchor-bent system typical of houses built in communities settled by the Dutch.

An artist’s rendering of Daniel Pieter Winne’s house suggests its original appearance. The dominant external feature of a Dutch home was its steep gable roof. It was constructed with a series of post-and-beam supports called “anchor bents.” The spaces between the bents were filled with locally manufactured bricks—known as “nogging”—and then covered with pine clapboards. The interior face of the nogging was plastered and whitewashed. The smoothly planed posts and beams and clean white walls would have enhanced the natural light entering the room from the casement windows.

Metropolitan Winne House

The Winne House had two rooms on the ground floor, with a half-story above and a cellar below. The Museum installed the larger of the two first-floor chambers, which was accessed through the dwelling’s front entrance, an iconic, two-section, Dutch door

1751 Winne House NY Metropolitan Museum – The main chamber of a colonial Dutch dwelling was the setting for a wide variety of activities. As suggested by the hearth, one of its primary functions was food preparation, but it was also used for sleeping, socializing, and storing and displaying ceramics, metalwork, textiles, and clothing.  ———–   Notice how open the hearth is. The docent said fire was the number two cause of death for colonial women.

Detail of hearth tile. The docent said the bible stories on the hearth tiles were used to educate the children  (May 24, 2012 hard taking shots in the dark)

This room contained an open, or “jambless,” fireplace with a broad hood to draw smoke up the chimney. The mantel was typically draped with a fabric valance as it is displayed today. The mantel, windows, doors, and shutters are reproductions, as the originals were removed over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

New York Metropolitan –  New York Dutch Room  by Matthew Thurlow
Department of American Decorative Arts, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The New York Dutch Room comes from a house built in 1751 in Bethlehem, New York, for Daniel Pieter Winne (1720–1800). The woodwork demonstrates the reliance on traditional Netherlandish building practices in late colonial New York. Dutch immigrants began settling the Hudson River Valley in the early seventeenth century but continued to construct houses and barns much as they had in the Netherlands through the end of the eighteenth century. The New York Dutch Room is presented as a decorative arts gallery rather than furnished as a period room. It features furniture, metalwork, ceramics, and glass distinctive to New York households of Dutch heritage.

Dutch settlement of the New World originated on the island of Manhattan, then rapidly moved northward along the Hudson River to present-day Albany, where a thriving community developed through farming and trade with Native American tribes. Winne’s great-grandfather Pieter Winne (d. 1692), the progenitor of the family in America, left Ghent, in the province of Flanders (part of modern-day Belgium), and arrived in New Netherlands in 1652 after a brief stay in Curaçao, a Dutch colony in the Caribbean. Through farming and the operation of saw- and gristmills, Pieter Winne acquired a modest estate. He was able to provide his thirteen children with a comfortable upbringing. Winne’s house and mill were situated on a creek named Vloman Kill, or Fleming’s Creek, in recognition of his Flemish origins. The Winne family continued to reside along the creek through the end of the nineteenth century.

For nearly 200 years, the Winnes were tenants of the Van Rensselaer family, the great patroons, or manorial lords, of the Albany region. Their one-million-acre estate was known as Rensselaerswyck. The Van Rensselaers lived in a grand manor house built 1765–69 in the English Georgian style (28.143). The Winnes’ rent varied over time. Until 1764, they ceded 10 percent of their annual produce to the Van Rensselaers. After that, they were required to pay a fixed rate of ten bushels of wheat per year. When Peter Winne first settled in Rensselaerswyck, his rent went to Jan Baptist Van Rensselaer. The Museum owns a painted glass window (52.77.46) that Van Rensselaer commissioned in 1656 for the First Dutch Reformed Protestant Church of Beverwyck (present-day Albany). After the church was demolished in 1805, the window was installed at the head of the staircase in the family’s manor house.

An artist’s rendering of Daniel Pieter Winne’s house suggests its original appearance. The dominant external feature of a Dutch home was its steep gable roof. It was constructed with a series of post-and-beam supports called “anchor bents.” The spaces between the bents were filled with locally manufactured bricks—known as “nogging”—and then covered with pine clapboards. The interior face of the nogging was plastered and whitewashed. The smoothly planed posts and beams and clean white walls would have enhanced the natural light entering the room from the casement windows.

The wrought iron hardware produced for Dutch houses in upstate New York followed a utilitarian aesthetic. The door hinges found in the New York Dutch Room feature a swelling, or nail pad, at the end closest to the doorjamb (49.117.46). The swelling accommodated additional nails and thus strengthened the hinge’s attachment to the door.

The Winne House had two rooms on the ground floor, with a half-story above and a cellar below. The Museum installed the larger of the two first-floor chambers, which was accessed through the dwelling’s front entrance, an iconic, two-section, Dutch door (NYDR.2003.1). This room contained an open, or “jambless,” fireplace with a broad hood to draw smoke up the chimney. The mantel was typically draped with a fabric valance as it is displayed today. The mantel, windows, doors, and shutters are reproductions, as the originals were removed over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

Two kasts are in the New York Dutch Room. A distinctive type of cupboard strongly architectural in design, the kast is an icon of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Dutch-American domesticity. One is a rare example of joined oak furniture from seventeenth-century New York (1988.21). The painting on its surface simulates stone—a highly unusual effect. On the other kast, the doors feature grisaille-painted pomegranates and quinces, symbols of fertility (09.175). Considered a householder’s most important piece of furniture, it was used for storing linens and was often presented as a dowry gift.

Although substantial in size, kasten were often constructed in several pieces and could be easily taken apart for a move. Craftsmen in areas settled by the Dutch in New York and New Jersey made kasts in a range of sizes and quality, while wealthier Dutch New Yorkers owned elaborate examples imported from the Netherlands, which incorporated exotic woods that would have been difficult to obtain in the colonies. A seventeenth-century Dutch genre painting (1975.1.144) features an example with veneers of South American rosewood and African ebony.

The New York Dutch Room installation includes two singular pieces of furniture that suggest the intermingling ofEnglish and European craft traditions in colonial New York, a city that supported a diverse population of artisans and patrons. The late seventeenth-century turned armchair (41.111) was originally owned by Dutch immigrants living in the New York City area. There is no doubt the desk-on-frame (44.47) was also made locally. It was discovered in Brooklyn and incorporates gumwood, a regional resource. Moreover, an inscription inside the lid records a business transaction involving one of the numerous Schenck families of Kings County, New York. The double-arched moldings that frame the pigeonholes of the interior can be dated stylistically to about 1700. However, no comparable piece is known.

Also in the New York Dutch Room are a variety of silver vessels manufactured in colonial New York. Two-handled bowls chased into six equal panels, such as the example by Jacob Boelen (24.105), are a form peculiar to early New York silver. Their design represents a crossbreeding of northern European and English sources, with deeper roots in the Italian Renaissance, but their function closely followed Dutch practice of passing a communal beverage at ceremonial events.

Sources:

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=35442617

http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/albany/bios/w/piwinne8568.html

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=branagak&id=I7951

http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/old-winne-place

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/dutc/hd_dutc.htm

http://www.antiquesandfineart.com/articles/article.cfm?request=959

http://www.simonhoyt.com/thumbz/Van%20Wie/Winne-Van%20Wie%20Home%20to%20Metropolitan%20Museum,%20NY%20City.txt

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~winnwilcox/pwinne.html

 

About these ads
This entry was posted in 12th Generation, Artistic Representation, Historical Site, Immigrant - Continent, Line - Shaw, Place Names, Public Office, Storied and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to Peter Winne I

  1. Pingback: Pieter Winne II | Miner Descent

  2. Pingback: Origins | Miner Descent

  3. Gail Larson says:

    I am the seventh great-granddaughter of Pieter Winne through his son, Christian Winne.

  4. Pingback: Albert Andriese Bradt | Miner Descent

  5. I am the 9th great grand-daughter of Pieter Winne through his son Pieter Pierterse Winne. See Ancestry.com ScarfHemmerling Family Tree

  6. Pingback: Aert Jacobsen (Van Wagenen) | Miner Descent

  7. Pingback: Famous Cousins | Miner Descent

  8. Pingback: Hendrick Hendrickse Van Wie | Miner Descent

  9. Pingback: Hendrick Gerritse Van Wie | Miner Descent

  10. Pingback: Peer Jan Hendricks | Miner Descent

  11. markeminer says:

    One of the highlights of our May 2012 visit to New York was finding our ancestor’s house in the Metropolitan Museum. (His son’s house if we’re being scholarly accurate) Pieter Winne’s home was installed in 2003 as the Met’s New York Dutch Room,. It wasn’t easy to find, in the very back in a dark attic room. My shots are a little fuzzy because of the low light,

    A docent was giving a tour of the room next door. As we passed through Pieter’s room, I mentioned my relation. She said she didn’t normally stop in this room, but for our benefit she did and gave us a full run-down on the room and it’s contents. I’ve included the Met’s essay about this room at the end.

    btw, the Met is the most imposing museum I’ve visited. Maybe fewer supremely famous pieces than the British Museum or Louvre, but the scale of thousands upon thousands of objects documenting all of human history was overwhelming. Our little piece is tucked away in a third floor attic,

  12. Pingback: Artistic Works and Representation | Miner Descent

  13. Pingback: Cornelius Brown Jr. | Miner Descent

  14. Brad David Winne says:

    You have assembled some wonderful information on Pieter Winne, my 9th great grandfather.
    We still live in the same area where our family began long ago. Being able to observe the restoration progress on the home of Pieter Daniel Winne (1699-1759) and Rachel Van Allen (1700-1775) is awesome.
    Thanks for sharing an interest in our family.
    Brad David Winne (1956-20xx) I am the son of Douglas Winne (1929-1982) and Rosemary Brooks (1932-1995)
    Douglas Winne (1929-1982) is the son of Arthur Winne (1891-1981) and Barbara Van Wormer (1898-1987)
    Arthur Winne (1891-1981) is the son of Ira Kipp Winne (1865-1955) and Ella W. Westervelt (1865-1953)
    Ira Kipp Winne (1865-1955) is the son of Marcus Lasher Winne (1831-1905) and Jane Ann (1828-1882)
    Marcus Lasher Winne (1831-1905) is the son of Andrew Winne (1811-1863) and Helen Lasher (1811-1896)
    Andrew Winne (1811-1863) is the son of Daniel Winne (1791-?) and Maria Weatherwax (1793-1838).
    Daniel Winne (1791-?) is the son of John D. Winne (1758-1837) and Agnietje Van Wie (1765-1832).
    John D. Winne (1758-1837) is the son of Daniel Pieter Winne (1720-1800) and Jannetje DeForest (1722-?).
    Daniel Pieter Winne (1720-1800) is the son of Pieter Daniel Winne (1699-1759) and Rachel Van Allen (1700-1775).
    Pieter Daniel Winne (1699-1759)is the son of Daniel Winne (1675-1757) and Dirkje Van Ness (1675-1757).
    Daniel Winne (1675-1757) is the son of Pieter Winne (1609-1690) and Tannetje Adams (1638-1694)

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Brad,

      Glad you liked it. Do you pronounce the last “e” on your name? When I visited the Winne home in the NY Metropolitan museum (tucked away in a corner attic btw) , the docent called him win – ee.

      Thanks, Mark

      • Brad David Winne says:

        Hi Mark,
        We pronounce Winne like the Walt Disney character, Winnie-the-pooh. Some cousins also spell it the same way with the 2nd “i”. My great grandfather and one of his brothers buried in Bethlehem share a tombstone with Winnie on one side and Winne on the other.
        We too have visited the home of my 6th great grandparents, Daniel Pieter Winne and Jannetje DeForest, at the Metropolitan museum. Their son John Daniel Winne served in the Revolutionary war. There is a DAR historical marker for him at the Winne cemetery close to where their house was built. I believe you will find Jannetje DeForest is a descendant of Jessé de Forest (1576 – October 22, 1624) who was the leader of a group of Walloon Huguenots who fled Europe due to religious persecutions. Today, there is a Monument in Battery Park, New York City called the Walloon Settlers Memorial. That monument was given to the City of New York by the Belgian Province of Hainaut in honor of the inspiration of Jessé de Forest in founding New York City. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jess%C3%A9_de_Forest
        Thanks again, Brad

  15. Lolly Winne says:

    This is wonderful! Thank you so much for posting such an in depth history of the Winne family! :) I have to find out how far down the line I am, but I know I’m a direct descendant as well. I visited the Winne home with my father (Norman Winne) for the first time this past September and met Brian Parker. What a terrific guy and an incredible job he is doing restoring the old home! I took many pictures, so if anyone would care to see them, feel free to contact me at lolly.winne@gmail.com or you can send me a friend request on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/lollywinne. I have all the pictures posted on there. By the way, Brian Parker suggested that all of us Winnes begin a discussion (maybe via a yahoo group?) with regards to starting an association in the Winne name. If anyone is interested in hearing more, let me know! :)

    Leslie (Lolly) Winne
    Little Falls, NY

    • markeminer says:

      Hi Lolly,

      I’m glad you liked it. I’d love to see more Winne house pictures. It was fun to see a relative’s house in back attic of the Metropolitan Museum. “From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler” where the kids ran away and lived in the Metropolitan was one of my favorite books as a ten year old so having a family house there is a fun opposite.

      I’d love to see more Winne house pictures. I’ll send you a facebook friend request,

      Cheers!

      Mark

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s